The Cornell Lab Bird Academy Discussion Groups Joy of Birdwatching Activities: Different Seasons, Different Birds

    • Eva
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Activity 2: Birds in my area all year round - 1) The Crimson-fronted Parakeet is one of the residents in my neighborhood. I have seen and photographed it recently. It is endemic from south-eastern Nicaragua to western Panama, and occurs in the Central Valley of Costa Rica, in which it is the most common parakeet: a9e1bfe5-7709-456a-9937-eecc406fe2ec 2) The Great Kiskadee is also one of the year-round residents in my neighborhood. Even though I have not photographed it, I have heard and seen it around here. It is one of the largest Tyrant Flycatchers and it's common throughout most of Costa Rica. 3) The Clay-colored Thrush, the national bird of Costa Rica, is the last bird that I will mention, but there are still many others that occur year round around here. It is the national bird because of its incredible songs that it whistles from March to June. This bird is very common around here.   Birds in my area for part of the year - 1) The Summer Tanager is a bird that migrates north to breed during the months of June, July, and August, and comes back to Costa Rica (Central America) to winter. 2) The Chestnut-sided Warbler has a similar migratory pattern as the Summer Tanager: it migrates north to breed from mid-March to August, and then comes back to Costa Rica (Central America) to winter. 3) Yet another bird with a similar migratory pattern is the Broad-winged Hawk, a raptor: it migrates north to breed from June to September, and then comes back to Costa Rica (Central/South America) to winter.
    • Eric
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      • Activity 2: Three species year-round residents are Brown Pelican, Common Gallinule, and Yellow Warbler. Three species that only live for part of the year are American Redstart, Black Swift, and Wilson's Snipe. I have been able to see all of them in Puerto Rico. Wilson's Snipe was a lifer in December 2019.
      • Activity 4: If I were to visit my favorite spot today, I could see Bananaquits, Puerto Rican Woodpeckers, Puerto Rican Flycatchers, Greater Antillean Grackles, Brown Pelican, Scaly-naped Pigeon, Mangrove Cuckoo, White-crowned Pigeon, and among others. If I came back in six months, I could see American Redstarts, Black-and-white Warbler, Northern Parula, Prairie Warbler, Northern Waterthrush, Hooded Warbler, Yellow-billed Cuckoo, Ovenbird, and among others.
    • Eva
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Activity 1: - Northern Cardinal with Blackburnian Warbler: the Northern Cardinal stays in the same areas all year round, although very few fly a little bit more south and west during the summer. On the contrary, the Blackburnian Warbler winters in the northern Andes Mountains and the mountains of Costa Rica, and then migrates up to northern U.S.A. and Canada to spend the breeding season during the summer. - Scarlet Tanager with Western Tanager: the Scarlet Tanager winters in the western Amazon rainforest, and then migrates up to northern U.S.A. to spend the breeding season during the summer. Similarly, the Western Tanager winters in western Central America and Mexico, and then migrates up to Pacific U.S.A. and Canada. - Ruby-throated Hummingbird with Rufous Hummingbird: the Ruby-throated Hummingbird winters in western Mexico and Central America, and then migrates along eastern U.S.A. until it reaches northern U.S.A. and Canada to spend the breeding season during the summer. Similarly, the Rufous Hummingbird winters in Pacific Mexico and migrates along Pacific U.S.A. until it reaches Canada. - Sandhill Crane with Yellow-bellied Flycatcher: the Sandhill Crane winters in several spread out areas in southern and central U.S.A. and then migrates in a big group until it reaches Canada and Alaska. Similarly, the Yellow-bellied Flycatcher winters in Central America and southern Mexico, and then migrates up to Canada.
    • Cathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 45
      Activity 2:  I was surprised at many of the birds in the explore birds section, as I had not seen quite a few of them.  I was surprised that robins were listed as year round, as it is unusual to see them in the winter.  I might see them once a year on a very nice day in the winter.  But seeing them typically is a sign of Spring to my friends and I. Cardinals and blue jays are also listed as all year, which matches my experience. I learned I should not expect to see the common grackle in the winter. The red-winged blackbird will be less common when I visit one of my favorite sites in the winter. I was surprised to see the following birds listed as summer birds in my area:  Indigo Bunting, tree swallow, orchard oriole, green heron, scarlet tanager, purple marlin.  I may have seen the female scarlet tanager, but never a red, male one.  Seeing any of these birds would make my day.   Many area (Maryland) birds which are common are relatively year-long, but not all.
    • Marcia
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Activity #1. I have great respect now for the Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds, Scarlet Tanagers, Yellow-Bellied Flycatchers and so many others who fly such massive distances twice a year. Activity #2. In my Toronto area I often see Black-capped Chickadees, White-Breasted Nuthatches and Downy Woodpeckers year-round. But this year was the first time I became aware of migration patterns. In May, for one lovely week, I watched Orchard Orioles, Baltimore Orioles, Rose-Breasted Grosbeaks and Yellow-rumped Warblers. Looking forward to seeing them again in the autumn! Activity #3. I would never have recognized the Common Loon in its winter colours. I just recently became aware that the pale birds around our house in the dead of winter are the same American Goldfinches that are brilliant yellow all summer. fullsizeoutput_23c7fullsizeoutput_27a7 Activity #4. At this time of year a few of our likely birds are Trumpeter Swans, Red-bellied Woodpeckers and Indigo Buntings. I've seen the first two and am still looking for the third! In six months I'll be on the lookout for Hooded Mergansers, Pine Siskins and Merlins.
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Activity 4: One of my favorite birding spots is the Rocky Mountain Arsenal Wildlife Refuge. Right now, I would expect to see quite a few snowy egrets and American White Pelicans. I would also see Swainson's Hawks and Burrowing Owls and Western Kingbirds. In six months the landscape changes and breeding pairs of Bald Eagle return. You also see more Ferruginous Hawks at that point as well.
    • Laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Activity 1--We noticed that the migration patters sometimes were the same directions, but on different sided of the country.  It was interesting to watch the movement and the increases and decreases in the population of certain areas. Activity 2 -- We looked at migration patterns of the birds we have identified so far.  Most of the birds are with us year round, such as the Spotted Towhee, Red-Tailed Hawk, and Oak Titmouse.  The one we found that is not with us all year us is the White-crowned Sparrow.  We saw this bird all winter, but it disappeared when the weather changed.  Since we are inexperienced birders, it was a validating experience when we saw that our observations were confirmed by reliable data.  Using the migration patters will be very beneficial as we begin to identify more and more birds. Activity 3 --We noticed that the male American Goldfinch, in the summer, has a pastel yellow body, an orange bill, and a black cap.  By winter, the bird had a brown body, a brown bill, and the black cap had disappeared.  The Common Loon, in the summer, had a black-green head, white spots and stripes all over the body, a black bill, and a dark blue chest band.  By winter, the body of the bird was brown, the bill was grey, there were no spots or chest band, and the chest was white. Activity 4--Because of Covid-19, our favorite birding spot is our back yard.  In our yard we have House Finches, Oak Titmice, Spotted Towhees, California Towhees, Mourning Doves, Black Phoebes, and Bewick's Wren.  All of these birds stay is Santa Clarita year round, but in the winter we have White-Crowned Sparrows, so in six months we can expect that. My granddaughter and I are taking this course together.  I am homeschooling her, and we incorporating this class into her science.  We have learned so much throughout this course and are turning into avid birdwatchers.  Birds just used to be feathers and sounds.  It is very empowering to know the names of our local birds, learn their habits, and recognize some of their songs (song ID is difficult).  Looking forward to being able to expand our birdwatching range soon. Our spotted Towhee:   IMG_3863
    • Devery
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Activity 1:  I found it interesting that the migration north in the spring and south in the fall for some of the selected birds followed different patterns.  As a newcomer to bird watching, I am glad to know the birds I missed during the spring migration will be coming back in August and/or September, giving me another opportunity to see them.  
    • Theresa
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Activity 2: Year-round versus part-time residents.  According to eBird, three species I can expect to see year-round in my area are cardinals, mallard ducks, and great blue herons.  Of those three, I have only seen cardinals and mallards in the winter months; I would be beyond shocked to see a heron in the winter, especially since many of the ponds where I usually see them in summer are small enough to at least partially freeze in the winter.  Some of the species listed as part-timers are much less surprising, like ruby-throated hummingbirds, green herons, and juncos.  I've see the first two of those only in the warmest summer months, and the junco only once or twice in very late winter/early spring.  Something I'm learning as I go along is that there are no hard and fast windows or "deadlines" beyond which you will or won't see a particular bird, there are always stragglers. Activity 4: expected birds at my favorite spot.  Was out there this morning and saw 10 times the number of red-winged blackbirds that I saw of anything else.  :P  I wasn't expecting a huge variety but I wasn't expecting so little diversity either.  In 6 months the blackbirds will probably have gone but the Canada geese and possibly mallards will still be hanging around.  Anything else I see besides sparrows will be a nice bonus; according to Merlin there are about 65 species I might see in my location on December 22, so I'll definitely be on the lookout!
    • Hannah
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Activity 1: The Northern Cardinal’s range remains relatively similar year-long, whereas the Blackburnian Warbler’s range changes drastically throughout the year. The cardinal’s range spans from southeastern Canada to southern Mexico, with a heavy concentration in the eastern U.S., year-round. The warbler is abundant in Central America and the northwestern tip of South America during the winter months. It migrates to southern Canada and the northeastern U.S. for the summer months. The Scarlet Tanager migrates from southern Canada and the northeastern U.S. to Central America and northern South America. The Western Tanager migrates from British Columbia, parts of the Canadian territories, and all across the western side of the U.S. to western Mexico, southern Mexico, and Central America. The Ruby-throated Hummingbird migrates from southern Canada and the northeastern U.S. to southern Mexico and Central America. The Rufous Hummingbird migrates from western Canada and the western U.S. to central and southern Mexico. The Sandhill Crane can be found across parts of central Canada, the Canadian Arctic, the northern U.S., and Florida during the summer months. During the winter, it can be found in central California and parts of the southern and midwestern U.S. The Yellow-bellied Flycatcher can be found in southern Mexico and Central America during the winter, and across central and eastern Canada, northern Alberta, and parts of Yukon and Alaska during the summer. Activity 2: Three species that are year-round residents in my area are the American Robin, the American Goldfinch, and the Northern Cardinal (all of which I have seen many times before). Three species that only live in my area for part of the year are the Tree Swallow, the Yellow Warbler, and the Baltimore Oriole. I have seen the oriole, and I suspect I have seen the swallow. Activity 3: Male goldfinches in the summer are bright yellow with stark black wings and white wing-bars. In the winter, their yellow plumage shifts to a dim, dusty yellow with a white/buff-coloured chest and belly. In summer, Common Loons sport a deep green necklace, an all-black head, and a black black speckled with white. In winter, these same loons lose their green necklace and white speckles. They don a white face, neck, and chest, and a black back. Activity 4: My favourite birding spot currently has Wood Ducks, Mallards, Double-crested Cormorants, Bluejays, Black-capped Chickadees, Trumpeter Swans, and many more. In six months, I can expect to see Dark-eyed Juncos, Black-capped Chickadees, Northern Mockingbirds, and Canvasbacks.
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Cardinal and Warbler The Northern Cardinal appears to have considerable range abundance overlap between its breeding and non-breeding seasons and through the year.  It does not seem to migrate. The eBird abundance animation shows considerable stability, with some changes in western regions of the U.S. They are present in abundance throughout the year in southeast Michigan. The Blackburnian Warbler, on the other hand, seems to be a long-distance migratory bird. During its breeding season, June 7-July 27, the population seems concentrated in lower eastern Canada and the upper Atlantic states. During its non-breeding season (Nov. 16-March 8) it is abundantly present in the NW region of South America. This warbler spends winter in South America in open forests, including coffee plantations, according to the Cornell Lab.  In its pre- and post- breeding migratory seasons it’s present in the U.S. Midwest and East and Central America. Birdwatchers have occasionally said they may have seen one during the migratory season in a wooded area in Ann Arbor. The Tanagers The Scarlet Tanager breeds June 7-August 17 in North America, mainly in the northern eastern quadrant of the U.S. A friend and I saw one –stunning--a couple of times in County Farm Park, Ann Arbor, last summer.  During its relatively short December to January non-breeding season it is abundant in northwest regions of South America. Pre- and post-migration it is present in both its breeding and non-breeding areas, Central America, and some additional areas. The Cornell Lab explains the long-distance migration as follows: Long-distance migrant. Twice a year, Scarlet Tanagers fly across the Gulf of Mexico between their breeding grounds in eastern North America and their wintering grounds in South America. They usually migrate at night. Individuals that spend the winter farther south migrate to breeding grounds later, and in more synchronized bursts, than individuals wintering further north. The Western Tanager sticks to the western region of the U.S. and of Mexico and Central America, not reaching as far south as the Scarlet Tanager but migrating farther north into upper Canada. It has a short breeding season, shorter than that of the Scarlet. Ruby-throated Hummingbird and Rufous Hummingbird During its breeding season, June 7- July 27, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird covers the eastern and midwestern U.S. and lower eastern Canada. The morning of June 11 I think one visited our potted Calibrachoe annuals (orange and purple ones) in Ann Arbor, Michigan; it did not have a bright red throat so was a female;  is it possible it was a stray female Rufous?  In its non-breeding season, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird is abundant mainly in Central America (and on the lower east coast of the Florida peninsula.  Their migratory path seems similar in both directions. They thus seem to be tiny birds that migrate long distances from the eastern U.S. to Central America, with peak migration in September (darker yellow on seasons timeline bar). Cornell Lab says they can fly 2,000 km without a break and that older birds travel ahead of younger ones.  The Rufous Hummingbird is somewhat similar in its migratory pattern. However, unlike the Ruby-throated Hummingbird, it is present near the west coast of North America and has a slightly earlier and shorter breeding season (May 24-June 14). It also appears to take different migratory paths northward (pre-breeding) and southward (post-breeding). This is a loop migration. The Rufous travels north up the Pacific Coast but returns to the south through Rocky Mountain states--Utah, Wyoming, Colorado, Arizona, New Mexico-- appearing to rely upon mountain meadows for food during southbound migration. Sandhill Crane and Yellow-bellied Flycatcher The Sandhill Crane species in the Western Hemisphere seems to have variations in its migratory behavior. Some smaller sub-species appear to be non-migratory (Cuban, Mississippian, Floridian). The maps on eBird show the population overall migrating northward as early as January and south beginning in August. The breeding population, between May 31 and September 7th, a long breeding season, seems to be very widespread as far north as Alaska and upper Canada. In general, they seem to spend the winter in the southern U.S. and northern Mexico. Migration density pre- and post-breeding seems greatest in Nebraska, Kansas and Oklahoma, a relatively narrow established route. The Platte River in Oklahoma is apparently a massive staging ground for the northward migration.  In Southeast Michigan, cranes appear in early March in open fields and meadows.  In late September they visit Michigan staging areas (and one friend's backyard in western Washtenaw County) prior to migration to Florida.  The small Yellow-bellied Flycatcher is a long-distance migrant. It breeds in New England and eastern Canada, with some populations as far north as lower Alaska and the Canadian Yukon. Unlike the Sandhill Crane, it seems to have a very short breeding season, June 28 to July 13, and each migration season is considerably longer than the short breeding season. The non-breeding season is November through mid-April.  The Flycatcher winters in Central America.  The Sandhill Crane’s breeding season is May 31- September 7, and each migratory season is about the same length as its breeding season. The migratory path/territory of this flycatcher is also broad, while that of the Sandhill Crane is narrower and concentrated in the central U.S. In both places, its breeding and non-breeding areas, it seems to seek forests or at least shade.
    • Kenneth R
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Activity 3: I have really struggled to distinguish between gold and bald eagles (younger ones) and red-tailed hawks that I see around Lower Klamath Lake WR, since [1] the distinctive white head of the bald eagle doesnt show up until they are older and [2] the variation on the hawks seems significant....I found this bit of description helpful: "While golden eagles and juvenile bald eagles can look similar, there are a few key differences. Golden eagles have gold colored feathers around the nape of their neck. Golden eagles also have feathers all the way down to their foot. Conversely, bald eagles have un-feathered yellow ankles (it almost looks like they're wearing capris). The last diagnostic tool is the head size; golden eagles have much smaller heads than balds (almost like a red-tailed hawk head on an eagle body)."
    • Kenneth R
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Activity 4: Having been to Tulelake 3 times in April and May, I am fascinated in how the species present even during that short period, have changed. During my last visit, the White-faced Ibis were leaving in the hundreds...what a sight.2P1A00892P1A0090
    • Kara
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Activity 2: I've been learning the importance of knowing what bird are seasonal, as I recently thought I had seen a tree sparrow but eBird warned me it was a rare sighting in early summer. I swear that there was a dark spot on it's chest! but I expect it was a chipping sparrow, which are more prevalent now than in winter months. This past spring I saw yellow-rumped warblers (first in Florida in late February, later here in Pennsylvania in early May) and magnolia warblers over two days in mid-May, but now they're all gone! Currently, I'm enjoying the peewees and wood thrushes, which apparently will only be around until fall. I'm sort of glad to see the catbirds leave around that time (so loud and whiny!). For year-round residents, I was surprised to learn that tufted titmice are so common around here since I only occasionally spot them. I see Carolina wrens year-round, a few are my little neighbors, always hanging out and setting up a nest around my deck. I have yet to see a goldfinch - which apparently are common here all year.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Activity Two: Three species of birds that are year round residents in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Virginia where I live include the cardinal, bluebird and Eastern phoebe. Three birds that are only in my area for part of the year are the ruby-throated hummingbird, scarlet tanager and Baltimore oriole.  They only spend the breeding season in this area. Activity Four: At one of the favorite spots for of bird watchers in my area,  I could expect to see 57 species of birds in June according to eBird data.  Some of the birds I have seen there in June include swallows (tree and barn), red-winged blackbirds, bluebirds, indigo bunting, red-shouldered hawk, and American goldfinch.   According to eBird data, in six months (December) I could expect to see 28 species of birds.   Some of the birds I would see would be the same as in June as they are year round residents.  However, others that I would only expect to see during December would be part year residents such as the hermit thrush and yellow-bellied sapsucker.  I  have not seen either of these birds and plan to look for them this winter.
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Activity 2: Three species that are year-round residents Phainopepla, Verdin, and Cactus Wren.  I see two of them regularly but I need to look more for the Verdin. Three that only live in your area for part of the year ·         Canyon wren – I seen them but had not paid attention to the fact that they are here only sometimes (M, A, M and then late June-July and Nov-Dec).  I had no idea that they skipped around like that. ·         Black Throated Sparrow – almost all year round but appears to take a short break late June.  I think this may be an error in the map since it does correspond to anything on the range maps. ·         The White wing Done leaves for a bit in the winter too – longer than the ap shows at my house. They were gone from early December to April 18 this year. ·         The turkey vulture is here most of the year (again gone a bit more at our property but close to what the ap shows). We 1st saw them this year March 19.
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Northern Cardinal with Blackburnian Warbler Northern Cardinal has few changes … some increase to the north in the summer. However the Blackburnian Warbler has a complete change from S. America to N. America. Scarlet Tanager with Western Tanager Scarlet Tanager has most breeding in the N central to east of the US while spends the non-breeding perion in north eastern S. America. Breeding season  os longer than the Western Tanager (Jun 7 - Aug 17 versus Jun 21 - Jul 6). Western Tanager is similar is that it breeds in the north (US/Canada) and non-breeding in the south (mostly central America) but very little overlap with the Scarlet Tanager. Ruby-throated Hummingbird with Rufous Hummingbird Similar comments to the Scarlet Tanager with Western Tanager on the pattern north to south. Although separate ranges for breeding, the Ruby-throated hummingbird Non-breeding season Dec 7 - Mar 8 in Central American overlaps with the Rufous Hummingbird non-breeding season which is Oct 26 - Feb 8 Sandhill Crane with Yellow-bellied Flycatcher The Sandhill Crane spends some non-breeding (pre-post too) in Mexico but more north of there.  The Yellow-bellied Flycatcher non breeding is all in south Mexico and central America. The Sandhill also ranges further north but not as far east.
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Activity 2 I explored Merlin likely birds Chickadee and Blue Jay is year round and do remember seeing in winter and in my backyard. Downy Woodpecker is year round although will need watch for it in winter. I only remember seeing in spring and summer. It was in my backyard a lot in May but now is infrequent. Grey Catbird and Brown Thrasher are May to October. The Thrasher I see in my yard, the Catbird in a local park. I will need to watch for them and see how late in the season I see them. The wood Duck is April to October.  We see them every year in a local park but I am trying to watch for them more as they nest there and hope to see their young.
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Birdwatching Through the Seasons Activity 2: Using Merlin’s “Likely Birds” feature and/or range maps in field guides, explore birds that are found in your area. Choose three species that are year-round residents, and three that only live in your area for part of the year. Have you seen any of them before? Share what you find in the discussion. I checked my range maps in my field guides against Merlin.  I found many of our birds extended to a larger area for year around in Merlin than in my older field guides. I checked these year around birds, since we see them nearly every day:  Oregon Junco, Bewick’s Wren, and Anna’s Hummingbird. I checked these for migrants:  Bullocks Oriole, Fox Sparrow, and Ruby-crowned Kinglet. I have seen all six before, but the second three only periodically.  The Bullocks Oriole we just spotted last week [first sighting, and mistook him at first for a Varied Thrush].  We expect to see the pair off and on through the summer breeding season [Apr-Sep]. The last time we saw a Fox Sparrow was early spring, probably late Mar or early Apr.  This large sparrow will come back in the fall to mix with the other juncos and wrens and kinglets to have a cozy winter [non-breeding season]. A hard one to identify is the Ruby-crowned Kinglet, which shares the Fox Sparrow’s migration timing.  This tiny cutie arrives in about Sep to share its non-breeding season and takes off about Apr to breed and raise their tiny young ones in northern Canada and Alaska.
    • Gabrielle
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      In their summer breeding plumage, we notice Common Loons have black beaks, red eyes, a green-black band around the neck. They also have more distinctive markings. They are checkered black and white on their back. In the winter, the beak is gray, the eyes are less red, and their colors are more simple, with a white underside and a gray upperside. Where we live, we can only see Common Loons in winter nonbreeding plumage. We'd like to travel to where they breed to see their patterns.
    • Jody
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I think it is interesting that the American Goldfinch's beak is black/gray in the winter and bright orange in the summer.  I never noticed that before.
      • Sophia
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Yes, me too!  I wonder how birds change their beak color?
      • Laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 5

        @Sophia Me too!!!

    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Activity 1: It was really interesting to compare the animated range maps.  I had never thought about how northern Cardinals don't migrate the way the warblers do!  Also, it was interesting to see how, with the two hummingbirds for example, they cover different regions of North America like Rufous Hummingbird takes the west coast and Ruby throated hummingbird takes the Mid/East.  I noticed the Rufous hummingbird had a different migration path going back south than on the way north to breeding grounds.  One thing that surprised me was how wide the range of Sandhill cranes is at one time during the year-reaching all the way to the north in Canada while some are still in the states! Activity 2: 3 birds that are year round residents in my area are Northern Cardinal, European Starling, and Red bellied Woodpecker, and I have seen each of those.  3 birds that migrate through the area and I have not yet seen are Sora, Dunlin, and Yellow throated Vireo. Activity 3: For both pairs, the colors and patterns seem much bolder and more strikingly cut in the summer plumage than the winter.  The common loon really lightens up around it's neck/face in the winter too, instead of all black like the summer
    • Mary Alice Smith
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      The Northern Cardinal stays within its US range most of the year, concentrated in southern and east coast states while the Blackburnian is a long distance migrant, whose range is from South American to the far northern boreal forests of Canada. The Ruby-throat and Rufous hummingbirds both winter in South American then head to opposite sides of the states for the breeding season. The Scarlet and Western tanagers likewise have similar wintering grounds in South America, but head to opposite sides of the states for the breeding season. Sandhill cranes winter in the southern states but then spread out across most of North America during their migration, spending their breeding season in Alaska and Canada. The Yellow-throated Flycatcher appears to make a long flight over water to get from its Central American winter grounds to its breeding territory in Canada.
    • Marietta Isabel
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Activity 2: I live in Panama, Central America.  I have seen the Baltimore Oriole around October. The Black Hawk Eagle once every 2 years, its not common to see him around. He is so beautiful. The Swallow-tailed Kite also comes around twice a year. Year round residents: Great Kiskadee, Lesson's Motmot, Gray-Cowled Wood Rail. Saludos, Marietta
      • Elizabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        We have Baltimore Orioles now here in Canada and have been here for about two weeks. I need to mark it down. The other birds I do not know.
    • Riccardo
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Activity 1: Northern Cardinal is pretty much "sedentary" than the other birds. Blackburnian Warbler and Scarlet Tanager have a similar migration path from andes in south america to the eastern part of north america. Scarlet Tanager and Western Tanager "meet" each other during the migration in central america but they take opposite directions when they arrive in north america the first goes to eastern side the second to the western side. Also the two hummingbirds coming from central america migrates to opposite directions in north america. Sandhill Crane during the year tends to space all the north america, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher from central america migrate to northern parts passing through the eastern part. Activity 2: As resident species I chose Eurasian Blackbird, Hooded crow and the European Serin, I see the first and the second all the year, the second is more often diffused in the city in the spring and summer. As non residents I chose the common swift, the barn swallow, and the common redstarts. The second is more diffused in the countryside, I haven't seen one at now in the city, the other two are presents. Activity 3: Both species present a more colourfull and notable plumage in the summer time, with more detailed patterns and bright colours. Activity 4: Now we are in spring here and there are a lot of birds coming for the warmer part of the year, in six monthes most of birds will be migrating to warmer places and only the resident ones will face the winter.