• Tamsyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Hi from Western Quebec, Canada! I live at the edge of the forest and have found that the more I learn about birds, the more I enjoy their company... Even the woodpecker (not sure what species, we call him Wesley) that drums on our metal roof at first light, or the robin that repeatedly and aggressively flings himself into his own reflection in the windows around our house. I love hearing great horned owls at night, but I think my favourite bird at the moment is the white-throated sparrow, whose sweet and simple song I remember from early mornings last summer but which I was only recently able to identify! My neighbour has said she has heard an eastern whipoorwhil in our neighbourhood, so I've my ears perked on my forest walks. Thanks for this helpful course!
    • lisbet
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I am looking forward to this course to learn more about birds. We have mostly sparrows, blue jays, cardinals around the bird feeder and off and on hawks are circling around high above.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I loved the Wall of Birds!  The artistry was beautiful!  My favorite bird was the American Cardinal -- love that bright red!  So beautiful -- especially in winter, against the snow!  Two birds I found in the guide book from my area (North Shore of Boston) -- are the Piping Plover and the Black-Capped Chickadee. I love to see the Piping Plovers scamper across the beach -- especially the little ones -- they look like fluff balls with legs!  The Chickadees will eat right out of your hand if you stand very still for long enough.  My favorite neighborhood bird is the American Robin.  Their coloring is striking -- the orange belly contrasting with the black head and wings.  Robin I love to watch them tugging a worm out of the ground -- they don't give up!  And their song is so cheery!
      • Eileen
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        Yes - After all of these years (I am a "senior" in age but not in heart), I have just discovered the magnificent coloring of the common robin!  What a beauty!  I will not discard them again as anything that is common.  I love watching them in a field (the whole flock of them) pecking at the ground, and arriving and leaving at the same time.  I have not noticed that before.  Love this course!  Just what I am looking for at this time.
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        Beautiful photo. Common bird with uncommon beauty!
    • laurel
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      3E07C5FD-C46B-4AEC-BFAC-BF314F7BE570My favorite bird in my neighborhood is the robin.  As I was walking around yesterday I found this whole egg on the ground.  It was cool (in both senses). I wanted to warm it up but decided it had been abandoned because it was infertile, so I left it for another creature.
    • laurel
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      3E07C5FD-C46B-4AEC-BFAC-BF314F7BE570My favorite bird in my neighborhood is the robin.  As I was walking around yesterday I found this whole egg on the ground.  It was cool (in both senses). I wanted to warm it up but decided it had been abandoned because it was infertile, so I left it for another creature.
    • Sherri
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      DSCF2726Yellow Headed Blackbird
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        where is this Sherri, thank you for sharing, so beautiful!
      • Sherri
        Participant
        Chirps: 6

        @Mary I am in Sorrento BC Canada

      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        Great find.  I've only had one yellow-headed blackbird and it was many years ago.
      • Glenda
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        Very nice! Where is this?
      • Sherri
        Participant
        Chirps: 6

        @Glenda Sorrento BC Canada

      • Sandra
        Participant
        Chirps: 31

        @Sherri Hi from Kelowna BC. We probably have several birds in common.

    • Sherri
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      DSCF2808 Two birds that I hadn't seen before - Yellow-rumped Warbler  
      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        Wow!  The yellow-rumped warbler is a winter visitor here in Florida and is a little quiet in color except for its butter butt.  It looks totally different in its breeding plumage.
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Activity #1:  The Wall of Birds I had so much fun with this interactive website!  It was fun to explore birds from the various regions of the world and to hear how they sound.  I selected several birds.  The two birds that intrigued me the most was the Wrenthrush from Costa Rica/Panama and the Paradise Tanager from South America.   Thank you for making The Wall of Birds website.   Activity #2:  Backyard Observations 1) Pigeons/Doves - Mourning Doves 2) Raptors - Red-tailed Hawk 3) Woodpeckers- Red-bellied Woodpecker and Snowy Woodpecker 4) Song Birds- Northern Cardinal, Blue Jays, Catbirds, House Wrens, Red-winged blackbirds, Black-capped Chickadees, Nuthatches (red-bellied), Tufted Titmouse, Common Grackles, Blackbird and Mockingbird.   Activity #3: Favorite Bird in My Neighborhood 1) The Hermit Thrush is my favorite bird in the world.  It has the most magical song that totally calms me.  The Hermit Thrush is a simple looking speckled brownish bird that likes to stay deep in the forest/woodlands.  I hardly ever see this bird, but I hear the song of this bird often. Hermit Thrush (This photo was found online from the Cornell Lab) https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Hermit_Thrush/id
      • Betsy
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I totally agree with you about the hermit thrush’s song. I usually hear it in the early evening of a summer day. And, yes, very calming and uplifting.
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      IMG_1583_edited-1 Phainopepla - this is my favorite bird. Not only is the name fun to say (took me a long time to figure that out but it really just rolls out), but it has unique flight and sound patterns (they can even imitate some other bird sounds). This is a description I have  - not sure if I compiled it or borrowed it -- The Phainopepla 16–20 cm long with a noticeable crest and a long tail; it is slender, and has an upright posture when it perches. Its bill is short and slender.  The male is glossy black, and has a white wing patch that is visible when it flies; the female is plain gray and has a lighter gray wing patch. Both sexes have red eyes, but these are more noticeable in the female than the male.  They build their nests mainly in mesquite trees near a mistletoe plant.  Some believe that the bird actually “plants” the seeds.  An individual may eat at least 1,100 mistletoe berries per day if available.
      • Donna
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        I have never heard of this bird before I read your post.  It is a very interesting bird and I like that both the males and the females have red eyes.  Thank you for sharing!
      • Jeanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        I love the Phainopepla also! One of the first birds I actually went out to find when a sighting was reported in a nearby locale.
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 6

        @Jeanne I have never heard of this bird either. Where did you see it? Very interesting bird.

      • Ann
        Participant
        Chirps: 16

        @Cynthia I see him often at our home in New River since we have several trees with mistletoe (one of their favorite foods).  I also see them at the Black Canyon Heritage Park in Black Canyon City - the park attracts a lot of birds.

    • Vicki g
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Activity 1 - loved the bird wall video and perusing it - which I will go back to - but mostly am excited to add this to my list of destinations for hoped-for road trips for the future! I loved the artist describing how she can get the artwork for a bird into her "muscle memory' by working at it on a scale so much smaller that the wall mural. I was quite surprised by that! Activity 2 - 3 birds: Robin in the songbird group is quite common in my area (Cape Cod MA) and in fact in the summer they put on an amazing concert at dusk many evenings. in same category I assume is Yellow Rumped Warbler, which my gransdson and I were introduced to  few months ago by someone we passed, while walking in a conservation area. They were collected in high bushes and in the light of that day it was rather challenging to see the yellow rumps.  Swimming bird - yesterday I saw some mallards with their striking green heads. My friend saw a common loon, but I could not find it - now I will look for them in the future. WADING BIRD: I have recently seen Great Egret and Snowy Egrets on my visits to marsh area and was confused by extra "hair" on neck and back of some snowy egrets, so found on your site that those are the wispy feathers distinguishing the adult breeding snowy egrets. Activity 3 - a favorite new bird is the Glossy Ibis, which I distiguished thanks to asking an experienced birder (itentified by size of photo lens) who was leaving an area I was entering, if there was anything I should watch for that he had seen. This bird is gorgeous! Its brown/tan neck camoflages it in the marshy reeds, but one you catch sight the full bird - such gorgeous colors of green/blue, purple. As I guide I checked in described - first there was just one in amongst some snowy egrets, and then more and more joined the one.  Loving this course, Thank you.
      • If you anyone liked the video with Jane Kim she did another live lecture nearly 1 year ago with more stories about painting the wall.  Here is a link to that lecture. Jane Kim Wall of Birds lecture May 2, 2019 Celebrate the diversity and evolution of birds with artist Jane Kim, who brought to life the Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s magnificent 2,500-square-foot Wall of Birds mural. Part homage, part artistic and sociological journey, The Wall of Birds tells the story of birds’ remarkable 375-million-year evolution. In this talk, Kim will discuss her new book about the project, The Wall of Birds, exploring the intersection of art and natural history, the creative process, and surprising lessons that we humans can learn from birds.
    • STUART
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      For Activity 3 I selected a bird popular here on our farm in Virginia, the Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo). We have a population of hunters, foxes and coyotes yet we have seen this bird thrive and grow in population over the years.  Always believed to be not very intelligent they seem to prove otherwise raising young and surviving.  Hunters comment that they seem to know the season and become quite invisible. We respect this breed the utmost. This photo was taken about 75 meters from our home.DSC_0016
      • Donna
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        Nice photo!  The last couple of years, people have been posting photos on social media of  wild turkeys crossing the streets or on the front lawns of people who live in western Long Island, NY.  I find it amazing that the wild turkeys can adapt to suburbia environments.
      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        I've only had a handful of turkey sightings here in Florida.  Wonderful.
    • Marty
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      We have a northern cardinal nesting on our front porch. We have been using the back door to get out of our house. Also, we have a pair of mourning doves nesting in a tree in our back yard. They also love perching on the front porch railing. We have a red tailed hawk living in our neighborhood now. Great to see these birds everyday. We are enjoying the course very much too!
    • Marylu
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Very informative, love the photos and videos     Thank you   Marylu Max
    • STUART
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Identified a Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerine)  and a Red Bellied Wood Pecker (Melanerpes carolinus) at our feeder and a Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) nested about 230 meters from our home. DSC_0019
      • Betsy
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        We’ve been seeing a bald eagle the last year here in central NY.  Great to have them around and not so threatened.
    • Doug
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I have enjoyed this first course from Cornell Lab!  Congratulations to Jane Kim on the amazing work she has done with the Wall of Birds!  I am always in awe at illustrators, especially biological illustrators.  I taught Biology for 54 yrs in high school and birds have been a huge part of my experiences with and without students.  We have 5 feeding stations at our home and they are fun to watch each and every day. We have had our problems with squirrels but I think I am winning!
      • Katie
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        I've had great luck with hot pepper bird seed. As they have taste buds, the squirrels hate it and leave it alone. I get it from my local Wild Birds Unlimited store.
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I have always enjoyed birds but this course is a terrific opportunity to get better at identifying them! I knew we had a lot of birds around our land, as we have feeders and several birdhouses spaced over the field. This course has given me the inspiration to consciously notice and count how many different birds we actually have! Just for fun I went outside with binoculars and was able to identify 15 species (thanks to my "All about Backyard Birds" book that I purchased at a visit to Cornell Lab of Ornithology last year). We are lucky to have bluebirds and tree swallows nesting in the houses this year. I've attached a picture of one of our red bellied woodpecker friends. I'm so happy to finally have the time to learn more about the birds!IMG_3547
    • Marty
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      DSCN8114 We spotted this beauty (Crested Caracara)a couple of weeks ago and I tried out Merlin to identify it  and got my answer very quickly.  Love Merlin!
      • Vicki g
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        what region are you, Marty? that IS a beauty.
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_20200423_084854 There's a beautiful pair of jays I've been seeing a lot recently, this one kindly posed for me for a while yesterday.
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        Interesting, what kind of a Jay is that?  It doesn't look like the blue jays in my area of Ontario.
    • Tara
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      This bird flew into our window but was ok, I think it is a blue grosbeak. We have seen him multiple times since at our feeder. The next bird I think is a painted bunting, beautiful. A pair showed up at feeder today.775613E4-5C82-4EBD-9B94-E8E31FAACF43328BC114-C7D7-488E-8C53-BB9B2AEB1B0BB8923FC1-3ECF-44D1-BB5A-7E4ED71712D6
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      The Wall of Birds is truly a great learning tool and marvellous art.  I find it hard to pick favourites but if I had to I think I would go for the Wandering Albatros. It is large, wonderful to watch fly, born in and fledges from some of the most challenging locations, travels vast distances without landing and is visually appealing. I live on the edge of the bush on the southern outskirts of Sydney Australia. The fires have gone and we are having some nice Autumn weather. There are many parrots in our area and those visiting our yard at the moment include King Parrots, Crimson Rosellas and Sulphur Crested Cockatoos. The George’s River is close and we have Shore Birds in some locations: Bartailed Godwits, Masked Lapwings etc. The largest species of owls in Australia is the Powerful Owl and we are lucky to have them in our bush valleys. My favourite local bird is the Cockatoo. They are very intelligent, great to watch fly and have personality.   4BD94749-ADF7-4ED1-9455-6ACCDE412BA0 857C1646-8B0B-437A-A91F-4564CEC3115E
      • Donna
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        Outstanding photos!  You are lucky to see these beautiful birds freely flying where you live.
      • Glenda
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        Nice shots! I've not been to Australia and look forward to seeing more photos from your 'patch'.
    • Carmel
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Hello fellow Birders, this is my first comment as I have just started the course, although I have an interest in birds for some time now. I walk most days and am amazed at the variety of species that  I see in my 3 Kilometre venture. Apostle birds are common on my walk, they are from the “ White and Winged Chough” family ( Corcoracide).  Superd Fairy Wren is another, it is one of my favourite little birds, they remind me of my childhood days, they are from the “Maluride” family. I also have lots of Magpies around the house and surrounds, not sure what family they belong to but I love their call in the late evening, they seemed to be calling all their kids to come home before darkness falls. I hope this is what I have to do and that I haven’ t bored the pants off anyone!🙂
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I just love turkeys.  I think they are among the most curious of birds that show up in the darnedest places.  My friend got a picture of this one running up the bank drive-thru lane... Turkey at the Bank
      • Donna
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        Hi!  Where was this photo taken?
      • Sarah
        Participant
        Chirps: 4

        @Donna Hi there!  I am in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.

    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Hello fellow Birdwatchers, I am very new to this and the more I learn the more excited I am. This virus life has got me thinking more and more about what to do around the house and near the house and even though I'm not that close to open nature I'm finding some amazing bird life not far from my apartment. I found a nest with at least 3-5 baby house sparrows and even caught a glimpse of the dad sparrow feeding them. There are some amazing pictures on this thread and I wish I could take one of this nest but it is wedged really close to the roofline so there's no way to get a picture without scaring the adult bird away and even then I can't get a good picture over the top of the nest. Anyways, I'm enjoying this course and can't wait to learn more and when this virus is gone can't wait to travel and see things I've only seen in books and online. Stay safe!
      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        Birding is the best therapy in these trying times.
    • Kate
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I have a pair of nesting robins and I thought the female might have been killed. But I saw them both today! I was happy to know they were safe 20200422_172839
    • Nathan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I took a biking/birding trip today and saw a few different birds at a marshland in Upstate NY! I saw a few Great Blue Herons and Great Egrets, red-winged blackbirds, European starlings, cardinals common grackles, bluebirds, robins, white throated sparrows, black-capped chickadees, a brilliant turkey vulture, northern shoveler couple, mallard couple, a  ring-necked duck, and a few others. I am falling in love with birding again, and love it.