The Cornell Lab Bird Academy Discussion Groups Joy of Birdwatching Activities: Noticing Behaviors

    • Juli
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      For Activity 1 I went outside and sat and watched several birds. First I watched three Tufted Titmice as they gleaned bugs from the undersides of the leaves in an oak tree. I saw several times some beak wiping. Then one of them started calling repeatedly and then flew across the yard to a magnolia tree. The other two followed. They seemed to be a family unit. Once they got over to the magnolia tree they continued gleaning bugs from the undersides of the leaves, and the one that had been calling continued being very vocal. It was joined by another group of Tufted Titmice. It turned out there were a total of seven of them. After that I watched a Downy Woodpecker as it foraged in the branches of a small dead tree. It found a sunny spot and started fluffing and preening. It was also doing some scratching of it's head with it's foot. I never would have realized that this was just a part of the preening process. The fact that they can not reach their head in any other way had never occured to me. Watching in this moment it was clear that it was a part of the birds preening.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I particularly enjoy watching blue jays pick through the peanuts-in-the-shell I put out for them, but haven't seen any in quite a while (and even when they are around, they really are quick about picking what they want and taking off). Meanwhile the red winged blackbirds and grackles took off with most of the peanuts while the blue jays were on hiatus. I have never been good at recognizing bird sound (or musical notes, for that matter), but I have been listening to different bird sounds here. Today I heard a loud distinctive call outside, and I just knew it was a blue jay, and sure enough, I ran to the window and there was a beautiful blue jay standing on top of the curved hook on my feeder crowing and scaring everybody else away.
    • Luke
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Activity 3: Birding by ear for five minutes. I was able to recognize five bird species; Carolina Wren, American Robin, Black-capped Chickadee, White-breasted Nuthatch and Gray Catbird. I also heard a burbling, warbling kind of a bird sound in a shrubby, weedy area but I couldn’t see the bird.
    • Luke
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      • Activity 2: Cornell Lab Feeder Cam
      • Black-capped chickadees invariably grab one seed and go.
      • Mourning Doves prefer to sit in the seed tray and swallow as many small seeds as they can.
      • Northern Cardinal likes to take medium to large seeds, open them at the feeder And discard the husks, and will stay long enough to take a few seeds.
      • Red-bellied Woodpecker alights on the vertical tube, takes a mouthful and flies off.
      • Common Grackle pushes other birds out and takes the biggest seeds, crushing them in its large beak.
      • Red-winged Blackbirds perch on the tube feeder to eat and will stay a few minutes.
    • Kathryn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Is this a Broad Winged Hawk?
    • Kathryn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      IMG_7870
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Activity 2: To keep the Hooded Orioles away from my hummingbird feeders, I put up an oriole feeder with oranges and grape jelly, as I had been advised.  The orioles love it, and it did the trick.  But when they come to feed they swoop in quite noisily and frighten away all of the other birds from the tube feeders, mostly finches and sparrows. The orioles will stand on the other feeders, even though they have no interest in the food contained therein, then erratically fly to their own feeder where they nervously peck at the food for a few seconds and fly off.  Interestingly, the House Finches have also taken a liking to the jelly and oranges, and I see them feeding at the oriole feeder more often than the orioles.  The finches take their time, as long as they aren’t being harassed, luxuriating on the jelly and oranges.
    • Luke
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Activity 1: I watched a Cedar Waxwing for about ten minutes. It was early morning and the sun’s rays were just kissing the treetops. The waxwing sat in the highest tips of a dead tree in the bright sunlight and was preening and stretching . I imagine the bird was warming up for it’s busy day.
    • Kenton
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      The birds I saw at the feeder were a variety of birds. The first bird I saw was a European Starling, feeding on some sunflower seeds for about 7 minutes. I then saw a Nuttall's Woodpecker for about 11 minutes on 2 different feeders. Then, I saw two Red-Winged Blackbirds in exactly the same area. They had one thing in common: they stayed away from each other.
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Activity 2: I watched the Cornell Feeder Cam and what a cornucopia of birds to see! The first bird to appear was a Blue jay followed shortly thereafter by a Red Winged Blackbird. They were both on the same feeder. The Jay didn't stay very long. Another Red Winged Blackbird appeared on a separate feeder but a Grackle landed and seemed to chase the Blackbird off. A Mourning Dove appeared. The Grackle landed near it bit didn't scare it off. Shortly thereafter another Mourning Dove appeared at the feeder. The Mourning Doves spent the most time at the feeder. Shortly thereafter a Woodpecker appeared ( Possibly a Hairy Woodpecker) followed by a second one. There also appeared to be a male and femalle Cardinal. It was fascinating to watch.
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Activity 1 I watched a group of Oak Titmice with great admiration and amusement. The group descended in to an oak tree. So many can fit in there but they are so tiny you can hardly see them from a distance. Such a cute bird with a lot of personality. They were crawling all over the branches and many were hanging upside down. I learned that this is their method of foraging for insects. Oak Titmice can also open nuts by holding them with their feet and pecking with their bill. I have not seen this yet but will be watching for it.
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Blue Jays were the first birds to appear when I watched the Cornell Lab Feeder Cam at Sapsucker Woods. First there was one using a fly in, grab, fly out technique. Then there were two using the same feeding method. One then settled on the solid seed feeder and took his time pecking while the other perched nearby and almost seemed to be keeping watch. A Red-winged Blackbird landed on a sunflower seed feeder and ate for about twenty seconds before leaving. Mourning Doves ate from the bottom tray of the little house feeder. They take their time and seem to eat a seed at a time. I am going to check back to the Panama Fruit Feeder. When I looked before there were Hummingbirds. One at a time they zipped in and out from the feeder so fast I am not even sure what kind they were.
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Certain birds come around every evening at this time of year and from practice I can identify some of their songs. The Mourning Dove, California Scrub-Jay, American Crow are very distinct. It is nice to hear the Common Raven’s croak. The Dark-eyed Junco, the Spotted Towhee and the Bewick’s Wren have unique songs. The California Quail make their ca CAA ca and kissing sounds. When I hear drumming the  Nuttall’s Woodpecker is usually near. The Red-shouldered Hawk’s screech can not be mistaken.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Activity 1: After watching the Cornell Feeder Cam I can say I saw a lot of foraging of seeds. At first a mourning dove arrived but was chased away by grackles. Shortly after the grackles arrived, so did a blue jay. The grackles were looking up quite a bit but I’m not too sure if that’s anti-predator behaviour. Grackles are fair sized birds. Finally the grackles left and the mourning dove returned and really just did nothing but eat for quite a while. Activity 2: Cornell Feedercam: Mourning Dove, Grackles and a Blue Jay Activity 3: Listened to the feedercam but couldn’t make out too many bird calls or bird songs. I’m really bad at identifying bird calls and bird sounds though.
    • This past summer in Rochester, NY I saw two peregrine flacons harassing a red-tailed hawk that was flying over. The peregrines would take turns flying about 30-40 feet above the red-tail, which was flying, and then diver bomb it. At the last second, the red-tail would flip upside down and extend its talons in the direction of the diving peregrine, which would then pull away. They did this for about 5-8 dive bomb attacks. Eventually, the red-tail flew off and settled down in a tree. Were the peregrines hunting the hawk, or trying to drive it away?
    • Yulia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Activity 1: A couple of Croaking Ground Doves was bringing dried plants and hairs (the type one might find inside a vacuum cleaner) on our movement light outside. Clearly they were trying to build a nest. It didn’t go very well since all their building material was falling down. IMG_2100 Some other Croaking Ground Doves or Quiguaguas as they are called here were taking dust baths. All About Birds looks like a website that can provide a lot of information on birds. I’m considering getting a monthly or yearly subscription. Activity 2: I was observing birds from the Cornell Lab Feeder Cam in Supsucker Woods. Common Grackles came in a group of 7 and sort of scared 2 Red-Winged Blackbirds and 2 Mourning Doves. But these guys came back. Unlike Grackles that ate altogether, Mourning Doves didn’t let the 3rd Dove land on the feeder. Grackles, Doves and Blackbirds stayed for a long time helping themselves with seeds. Blue Jays were more of solitary eaters: the second one came after the first one left. Red-Bellied and Downy Woodpeckers came at different times and left fast. They attached themselves vertically to a feeder that looked like a tree trunk. Grackles and Doves sat on trays and Blackbirds, Jays and a Northern Cardinal ate from perches. None of these birds would grab just one seed and leave. Activity 3: The birds around my house are pretty much the same all the time: Turkey Vulture/Jote, Rock Pigeon/Paloma, Andean Gull/Gaviota, House Sparrow/Gorrion, Rufous-collared Sparrow/Chincol, Croaking Ground Dove/Tortolita Quiguagua, West Peruvian Dove/Kukuli and Oasis Hummingbird/Picaflor del Norte. So I can hear them daily, except Turkey Vulture and Rock Pigeon that are only visible to me from the far. (I never heard a sound from a Vulture). They prefer to stay on top of the apartments across the highway in front of our house. And I can only hear Sea Gulls, so I walked around to make sure that they were Andean Gulls picking on city garbage. According to Merlin bar charts, they are here all year round. About 2-3 years ago I started hearing a beautiful song of a Shiny Cowbird/Mirlo. Since then I can see groups of them outside on the trees and cables in the mornings when they come for food.
    • Meg
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Activity 3: Although only one bird species was vocal at the time, I now have an understanding of the behavior. I could hear the urgency in a robin's call in my parents' backyard, so I ventured outside to see what was provoking it. I spotted the neighbor's cat crouched in the flowers below the birdbath. Thanks to the robin's mobbing, the cat's hunting attempt was thwarted and no birds were harmed!
    • ADORABLE ALERT: CUTE ADORABLE PUFFED UP BLUE BIRD I think this guy/girl is very cute. Do you agree? Here is my reason: He/she is all puffed up, looking at the camera, and half-spreading his/her wings. Look it his/her ADORABLE CUTE SMALL BEAK!!! Also, he/she is a juvenile.
    • C
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Activity 3:  I could hear the flight calls of an American Goldfinch, the calls of a Carolina Wren and a Grey Catbird while outside today.
    • wendy
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Activity 1: I think I was watching a staling at feeder. It seemed to peck a few times at seeds then raise head and eat. It flitted from one feeder to next. Activity 2: watched feeder cam which showed many birds. Some picked once from suet but most went to seeds. Blue jay seemed to peck several times in a row. Downy woodpecker pecked in upright position atvfeeder. Also saw pleated woodpecker. Some stayed a while and tried several feeders. Some went to one and flew away. Activity 3: really hard. On Cornell webcam. Heard a blue jay give a squawk when it left. Mourning dove wings beating when they flew. Heard some background song but couldn’t identify. Saw lots of birds though and with merlins help could identify some
    • wendy
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Activity 1: I think I was watching a staling at feeder. It seemed to peck a few times at seeds then raise head and eat. It flitted from one feeder to next. Activity 2: watched feeder cam which showed many birds. Some picked once from suet but most went to seeds. Blue jay seemed to peck several times in a row. Downy woodpecker pecked in upright position atvfeeder. Also saw pleated woodpecker. Some stayed a while and tried several feeders. Some went to one and flew away.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Activity 3:  Late afternoon in my backyard. Heard a woodpecker.  Mourning dove. Some kind of squawk, maybe catbird? Miscellaneous chirps, unidentifiable. This is really hard.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Activity 2: I watched the Cornell Lab Feeder in mid-afternoon and saw several Mourning Doves and Grackles. The Mourning Doves fed from the floor surface, while the Grackles fed from both the floor and perch feeders. The Grackles held seed in their beaks, often rotating it before eating it.  Blue Jays also visited, mostly taking seeds from the perch feeders. They took larger seeds and often flew away with them.  I saw one Blue Jay that held two seeds at once in its beak and flew away with them. Red-winged blackbirds also came, not staying long, just taking seed away from the perch feeders.  The feeder was also visited by two woodpeckers, I think a male Hairy Woodpecker (looked like the longer beak type) and female Downy Woodpecker (shorter beak).
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Activity 2: I watched the Panama Fruit Feeder around 1:30 pm on Aug 15. Nobody was there for a few minutes, then one bird flew onto a branch. It was a small bird, with a distinct yellow cap, black back, and yellow chest.  From eBird, I tentatively identified it as either a Yellow-crown Euphonia or a Thick-Billed Euphonia.  It stayed on the branch for a while, constantly looking around. Then it came in a little closer, flying onto a perch above the fruit, also constantly looking around, and stayed there for a while longer.  Finally, it flew onto a banana and started to peck at it, still always looking around.  It stayed on the banana and fed for a bit, then flew away. It seemed that it was constantly on guard at the feeder, always checking around for incoming competitors.
    • Tricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Activity 1: I watched a pair of Galahs sitting on a fence engaged in preening behaviour.  They both preened their own breast feathers and then took turns to preen the head and neck of their partner. Activity 2: My backyard bird feeder (in Canberra, Australia) attracts mostly Galahs, sparrows and crested pigeons, with the occasional visit from Crimson Rosellas and Sulphur Crested Cockatoos.  The Galahs are usually waiting when I put out the Wild Bird seed mix.  There is usually one Galah on the feeder, one on watch and a few others queuing up waiting for their turn at the food.  The one on the feeder usually gathers a few seeds in its beak and then grinds or cracks them.  I am fascinated by the way these birds also use their beaks as climbing tools to get on and off the feeder.  Once the Galahs have had their fill the sparrows and pigeons move in to clear up the leftovers.  In my front yard I watched a Red Wattlebird feeding on an Eremophila plant, pushing its beak right down into the bell-shaped flowers to get to the nectar. Activity 3: I can recognise many of the calls of the common birds in my neighbourhood - the Australian Magpie and the Kookaburra are unmistakeable!.  I can also recognise the Crimson Rosella, the Raven, the Magpie Lark, the Red Rumped Parrots and the Faiy Wrens.  The Koel is a seasonal visitor to the area and is another unmistakeable bird call that I have heard a few times lately.
      • Tricia
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        Update - i have just been watching two Galahs who appeared to be sharpening their beaks.  My bird feeder hangs from a wooden pole and i noticed that these two birds were both pecking at the wood - they were tearing small bits out.  After a few minutes of this they started rubbing the sides of their beaks on the wood - just like a chef sharpening a knife!  They were doing this for about 10 to 15 minutes.