• Karrin
      Participant
      Chirps: 47
      I am not sure I found anything surprising about their methods. Wait, I take that back - I thought it was surprising that the research teams have already gone through all of the possible letter / number combinations TWICE. What was interesting to me was learning how to identify crows' nests and that baby crows have blue eyes.
    • p
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      i was surprised to learn that you would actually take the babes out of the nest to the ground to study them.  What are the parent crows doing while you take their babies away?
    • Anne
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I was surprised that the baby crows were taken out of the nest and then returned with no adverse effects to the family.
    • That they use 3 different bands/tags to ID them!
      • Karrin
        Participant
        Chirps: 47
        I thought that was interesting, too - and I kept wondering if the birds are bothered by the one on their wings.
    • I had heard previously about some of how crows are researched but I did not know that they sex them via blood samples.
      • Karrin
        Participant
        Chirps: 47
        Yes! That was a fascinating tidbit!
    • Claire
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I'm surprised that the big plastic tags don't get in the crows' way. And the radio trackers, those seem cumbersome. I'm surprised that the processing that the researchers do doesn't disrupt the family life of the crow.
    • Elaine
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Going up into the nests to capture the baby crows to take blood and band them.  I hope they are gentle with them :)
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      in the hand
    • Sandra
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      That they take the babies so young to mark and study.  Also that the markings stay on for such a long time. That crows live to be 19 years old
    • Paul
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Getting up to those tall nests!  AND blue-eyed young.  I learned that in ornithology, but had forgotten.
    • Morgana
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I knew most of it as I have been corvid crazy since the cradle and have followed Dr. MacGowan's work for a very long time.  I guess the fact that the team could so closely follow individuals and identify their relationship with other other birds within the different flocks/families.
    • Diane
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      That they can climb up into those high trees to tag babies in the nests and that it doesn't disturb the mother's interest in her nest. Also the multiple banding method and that sexing the crows comes by taking blood.
    • Fiep
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I didn't know that sex was determined by taking blood and DNA testing. If crows live up to 19 years in the wild, how long would they live if they are in captivity/in a park/non-releasable facility?
    • Kimberly
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The way they identify them with three different ids.
    • Julie
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      The multiple banding  method and the ability to track crows for 18 years. I did not know they lived this long. This is the kind of meticulous work that reminds me of Jane Goodall tracking primates. Fascinating to know there are such personalities in crows. Admirable work. Great to finally understand why they hang out in cemeteries.
      • Chelsea
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        I really appreciated that little bit about cemeteries, too!
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1)length of life 2) no down on babies 3) at least in NY, maintain same nests
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1) that mom and babies tolerate banding, blood samples so well.
    • Erica
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The longevity of a crow is mind blowing!
    • Vicki g
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      `my reaction is a repeat of most all comments below. I love that they become individually known over time. I tend to be amazed that they tolerate all that "stuff" on them - bands, and tags, and radio thingies, and that those things do not alter their behavior in some way. Wee comment, if photographers are willing to give up their credits occasionally, it was hard for me not to peek at the credit ... which was often a dead giveaway as to which the crow was). HOWEVER, I still paid attention to the difference and learned something so it was fascinating - though I would count myself fortunate indeed to see a (non-stranded) baby in the field!
    • ReikiDave
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I'd agree with Ben.  I'm amazed at the nest to grave study !!  And on a highly individualized level !  Bird by bird, year after year.  I'm also amazed to learn of their longevity.  I'd have thought crows lived somewhere around five to six years.  Eighteen or nineteen !!!  Wow !!
    • I thought that crows would have lived way longer than 13 years.
    • J
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I was surprised by their longevity.
    • Ben
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      most interesting was the nest to grave approach. the amount of data that studying individuals that way must generate is kind of mind blowing! also, kudos to you brave souls for scaling such heights to collect data.
    • Randall
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I liked that they studied the birds as individuals and tracked how they were related to other crows.
    • suzanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I was surprised not only by the fact that they took babies but by the blood sampling.