• Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      After trying some of your new drawing skills, was it easy to see where and how each could be applied? Are you starting to feel more comfortable putting marks on the page? Which do you still want to work on?
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Colleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      This is always a tough one to learn. More practice needed.IMG_20220918_082832262
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      E39826B7-3580-4CFE-BDE6-FEC0039BC556This was a great exercise! I have never sketched in my life. I love nature, gardening to attract pollinators, nature photography and bird watching. I saw this course and thought I would try it to relieve stress and I loved the idea of journaling and sketching. So I decided to draw a single eye from a barn owl. It was fun and learning about depth of field is exciting. Thank you Liz for this course.
    • Shirley
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      EA4BC3EB-52AC-4353-AACA-0460BD5C2772
    • Li
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      3221661241459_.pic This is the ginger and garlic I drew. The light source is in the upper right corner. Through comparison, I found that due to the different textures of the objects, sometimes it is possible to distinguish light and dark quickly, but sometimes it is not possible. For example, ginger and garlic, the surface of garlic is smooth, so it is easier to distinguish the highlights and shadows on the bright surface; while the surface of ginger is rough, so the highlights are not particularly obvious, and it is also a little difficult to divide the layers in the bright surface. In addition, I also found that by adjusting the curvature and strength of the strokes, the objects can be better represented, but I am not proficient in this area. By the way, where do you start drawing first when you are drawing and what is the order of drawing? I sometimes don't know where to start. Practice makes perfect!Come on!
    • Marie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I liked this exercise, it was helpful.  I would still like to work on adding details to the drawing and the shadows.D7BF4C0E-A9E4-472D-AB58-C32DE08B5466764AD15E-FE7C-4956-B516-843A19589B9A
    • Gillie
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      Am feeling more confident committing to paper but making silly mistakes.  I still want to work on working quickly to get the concept of the shape down.   Passionfruit  
    • Madison
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      this was a fun exercise! I don’t really draw realism ever so it was good practice doing something with light source and depth. 05C9CF68-5363-4C58-9452-BE22591AD5EB
    • Elodie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      EggsWillowI feel like I need more work on my values, but this was a good lesson moving forward. I like crosshatching, but I have to be careful not to over-work it! Getting the reflective light was key to a 3D effect! I got inspired to try drawing my dog because she is black and white.
    • Jeanne-Marie
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I'm much more comfortable with the more simple line drawings, and I'm having fun experimenting with the mix of drawing and writing.   JMB journal page 02 - May 2022
    • Jeanne-Marie
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I'm not yet good at the light and dark ranges to get the 3-D effect, but it's fun to practice. JMB journal page 03 - May 2022
    • Laurna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      IMG_6823 (1)
    • Natalija
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      I chose to represent the curious Citrus medica var. sarcodactylis, or the fingered citron. chiaroscuro The mark making techniques I used are top row from left to right: outline, side shading, contour shading; mid row left to right: cross hatching , watercolor pencils, stippling; bottom row left to right: scribbling, blending, side shading. Perhaps my outline drawing would have been better without the horizontal lines. I think I need to work on the contour shading because there are areas where I overlap lines and get crosshatching. And my cross hatching is never just bidirectional rather diverse. I like how blending using a blending stump turned out. I was taught never to use this technique in school, but it is described as a technique used by scientific illustrators in the Guild Handbook of Scientific Illustration! So I guess I will be blending away in the future. As always, I am pleased with the Faber-Castell Albrecht Dürer Watercolor Pencils. If there is lack of detail it is due to the brush I used. All in all, an interesting exercise and I look forward to the next one!
    • MARLIES
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_20220327_0001
    • Rhonda
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      PXL_20220319_005849244.MPFeeling somewhat more confident, but there is still a lot of practice in my future.  I am enjoying what I am learning in this course.
    • Chantelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      A573016A-4F22-4D86-8486-1D8A779FC469 trying out the chiaroscuro technique, biggest challenge is getting the light parts to blend with dark parts.
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I tried to draw an orchid in a pot using the markings to create some three-dimensionality.  It was not a roaring success, but that was before I listened to the chiaroscuro lesson, which made sense of the marks for me.  Now I can see how to work with the hatchings, scribbles, etc. to create depth.  BTW, can anyone tell me how to get my photos from my google phone transferred here?  I'm android, not Mac.
      • Elodie
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        On my phone, I just email them to myself , then go to my computer and open my email to down load the image!
    • Rita
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I think I picked some difficult subjects for this task, but I love my collection of seashells and want to be able to sketch them a lot better. I had difficulty trying to depict the texture lines while also trying to use the hatching and dots to depict shadows. PearShellGeodeAndShell      
    • Chuyu
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      2 I'm getting more familiar with putting marks on my pictures. However, I'm still not very good at creating the 3D vision.
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      I feel most comfortable with depiction texture and dimension, however, placement of shadows on the object and at the base of the object need more practice. Study of light source and effect on subject matter will help with my drawing and my photography skill understanding and application. E87B81F8-B4DD-4B20-BC09-2F1CAE25DE5C9E349CBD-921F-47A2-803B-161E6181D53B E5602754-66A7-437B-B159-E187C40F3B93  
    • Dann
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Japanese Maple Japanese Maple Twigs
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I am starting to feel more comfortable, and I'm certainly starting to see where all the different techniques can be applied. For the chiaroscuro lesson, I started with an apple. It was tricky because (in addition to me being a beginner) the apple had a variety of light and dark colors independent of the amount and direction of light falling on it. My wife suggested a lime, and I think that came out better. With the apple, I used a lot of contour hatching to try to get the indentation where the stem was that then shifted to the overall round shape of the apple. I tried to use some scribbling for the area around the light part on the bottom left of the apple. With the lime, I started with contour hatching, didn't like it, and then switched to regular/straight hatching. I figured if it worked to show the roundness of the ball, it could work for the lime as well. I liked the overall effect. I did some scribbling at the ends to get the hard/dark parts. I also tried a few circles to get the dimples, but that didn't seem to work very well. I used blending to obscure these...somewhat. I liked using hatching for the shadow, blending it, then adding more hatching. The blending helped smooth out the value shift from the darkest to the lightest parts of the shadows, and it softened the shadows' edges. Chiaroscuro subjectsChiaroscuro drawing For this birch round, I used a lot of contour hatching for the growth rings. I tried to overlay that with straight hatching to show the straight grooves left by the chainsaw. I used stippling for some holes I noticed in the outer dark layer of the wood. Scribbling seemed to work well to create the lenticels in the outer bark, and a little contour hatching helped with the curls of bark spiraling every-which-way around the edges. A little blending of denser hatching at the various dark spots on the surface seemed to help with the value difference in parts of the wood. I'm guessing these were formed by slight burning from the friction of the chainsaw when I cut the round. Texture Dimension Value Birch Round
    • Olivia
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      • Trying to put in practice several `hatchings´ for this drawing, but when I took the draw´s photo, lights and shadows appears in the opposite distribution as you can appreciate.- I hope next time.dia4febrero22
    • Dann
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      DWilkens_Binoculars My Binoculars
    • Marguerite
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      PXL_20220129_181716792(2)
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      8EE4F43A-1F2F-42A5-9DA6-35D46F067AFB
    • Andrew
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      PXL_20220123_152613688 I used a combination of stippling and hatching to attempt this value exercise. The most challenging thing for me is achieving the transitions between the values. This drawing probably would have been more successful if I had stuck with just stippling.
    • Susie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      CBAShells When I drew textured objects with light shadow contrast - I became so preoccupied with the form and light shadow that I forgot to try out the various types of shading
    • Rebekah
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      While in general it was easy to see where some of these techniques would be applied, I wouldn’t say it is really apparent to me when I am looking at things. How to decide which of the shading techniques to use in which situations isn’t particularly clear yet….but I am totally new at this! Rebekah Hamilton
    • Michel
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I enjoyed practicing 3D techniques. Happy with my acorn by blending with the stump. The pear was not as convincing. I used contour hashmarking for the pear and crosshatching for the shadow. Tempted to finish with the stump but I was hoping to get an effective hashmarkA86734DB-B0A4-4D38-916B-8F057D82CDD847D1AB68-5C41-4CDF-B63E-5B08C626E157
    • Dawn
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      I think I need to work on contrast and values the most at this point.  The chiarosco, while interesting, doesn't seem like it would be applied a whole lot to field sketching moving objects.  I realized while doing this squash that my lighting is not the most desirable.  I have three bulbs in cages that each act as their own light source and cast their own shadows. IMG_1025
    • Dawn
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      IMG_1023I am starting to see better how to use different kinds of marks to make the kinds of textures that I see.  It was fun to scribble on the top of the bison head to make the curly hair. I don't think I was quite able to capture the texture of the lichen that I was going for.  Perhaps zooming in even more would be more effective. It is still difficult to get the values input correctly on something that is unevenly lit like the dog close-up at the bottom. I want to work on using the squint to get the values more accurate.  When I can get them right I feel like the image is most successful.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      B32833E0-D522-4653-8DC3-A7EA313A03CE
      • Dawn
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        Nicely done!  Your dark and light values are excellent.
    • Teresa
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      This is hard but I'm enjoying the journey and playing around with the techniquesIMG_1797
    • Anastasis
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      It's not easy, but with practice everything is possible. I tried to draww a mallard, because I´ve seen many of those lately. WhatsApp Image 2021-11-10 at 20.01.02
    • Beth
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      This was great practice and now that it's on the screen I see a lot of areas that need more attention. The crosshatching, which I played with a little here, is super tricky and I'd really like to figure out how to use it well. Untitled design9
      • Dawn
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        These look great to me.  You have really done a good job capturing the texture of the veg.  You can really feel the smooth shininess of the pepper and the dry papery onion.
    • Renee
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      This is definitely a progressive work in progress technique. I will need to practice on my blending the different regions in my sketch. Renee MiltonIMG_2161
    • Theresa
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Ran into a tarantula on the trail. Tried to sketch one using lessons so far.20210827_091859
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Yikes ! Very life-like.  Good depth and shading.
      • Theresa
        Participant
        Chirps: 5

        @Karin Thanks! The real one sure scared me.

    • Karin
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      IMG_0683   IMG_0639 trying to do chiarscuro of big cucumber. IMG_0644
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        I forgot to comment: It is getting easier to concentrate, very relaxing for me. I am really struggling with shading and depth of perception. I enjoy this learning experience and can't wait to learn more. I love just grabbing notebook and pencil and just sketching what is there.
    • Theresa
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I tried drawing the vegetable exercise. It's going take some practice, but starting to see how to make objects appear 3D with shading, light and dark.20210825_080255
      • Teresa
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        Your shading helped me in my shading :-)
    • Beth
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      PineconeI used this pine cone and hatching, contour hatching, and blurring to practice finding appropriate value that provides a 3D illustration. I'm not sure that a pine cone was the best option (I've never drawn a pine cone) and I got a little lost (!) but I tried to refer to a scale of light and dark to consistently convey where the lightest/darkest parts of the cone were observed.
      • Robin
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        That is a really beautiful drawing! I love how you captured the *sharpness* of the pointed ends. The shadowing looks great to me.
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        That is really good. Sometimes, the item picks us. This really helped me.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Very helpful techniques.  think I will wait awhile before sharing any of my attempts however really enjoying seeing others.  gives me hope mine will improve as my comfort level improves.
    • Jim
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      How challenging it has been to draw a pepper! The grain of the paper I use has been a factor as well. Will switch to a smoother grain. Color has been a challenge, too. shades of green, for example. Better luck with grey/black tones. But promising results with a touch of color on a peach. The pine cone was relatively easy, for some reason.IMG_2737IMG_2736 IMG_2739
    • Steve
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      IMG_2093
    • Arleene
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      Here are some of my attempts at using the skills you have taught us. I can see how to apply the techniques but will definitely need more practice. I did enjoy trying them all out. It was fun learning ways to draw and how to use the different marks. Also I found I was more relaxed, not worrying too much about the finished product and just having fun. I like to write notes in the journal as it helps me remember what I did and what techniques I used as well as anything special about that particular sketch. 07AB0AB4-CDBC-44E8-8BEC-E904FC507117_1_201_a8AE91CDB-A04E-4A7E-8F8F-06C3510918CF_1_201_aE0EF82E5-DE9A-4BFF-97C3-09C6C7236F9F_1_201_aI found the 3D shading difficult. I am looking forward to more lessons and practice
    • Kayla
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      After trying some of these drawing skills, it was a little easier to see where and how each could be applied. I am definitely starting to feel more comfortable putting marks on the page compared to before. I want to work on my shading a little more though. I decided to do a robin, although there wasn't much contrast and the proportions were a little off, I'm happy with how it turned out. IMG-4441
    • Fernando
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      988D92A9-71E4-42C3-935E-7FBBDFC2EDC1This is my last drawing and painting and is the result of all of your advice and the techniques taught by you during this course. I am quite happy because it has given confidence to continue with this endeavor. Dear Liz your advices have been very helpful and I have really enjoyed your talks. I will continue doing the exercises to improve this hobby .Thanks
    • Marc
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      image59CF226D-8D4A-41BB-A5A3-7AD5693F96A4I am starting to find it easier to find details and textures, as well I am getting more comfortable with putting pencil to paper. I had some challenges with chiaroscuro but I’m thinking it’s because I was to tense with my apple drawing and need to take a step back, maybe get the techniques to work for me. It was fun regardless and I am finding my work is starting to get better slowly with practice.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I have some problem making shadows look real - they seem too harsh. Any suggestions? I also need work on the distinction between showing value and showing surface texture. Fruit- chiaroscuroConch Shell
      • Caitlin
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        In your colored drawings, try using darker shades of the same color(s) of the object itself instead of using black to create the shadows. The same goes for the surface on which the object is set (note: the object's color may also be reflected onto the surface). For example in the real world, if you look at leaves in sunlight you'll see the leaves in the shade are actually a darker green and they are a very light green where the sun is reflecting.
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        I think you did a nice job on the banana. I am having the same trouble. With my rocks, I tried scribbling, that helped a little. With curved objects try contour.
    • Jacqueline
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      F90B3B30-EC3F-43FA-8A80-1F5F5D38255A
    • Jacqueline
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      4A6EB44F-A33A-4F76-B783-399B25D44691
    • Jacqueline
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      It is getting a bit more obvious where light and shadow appear on an object.  Now, to work on the gradients of shading.   E2B09C56-82DA-4E63-A8E2-EDA87B9EC73018444E7E-109F-4B64-B5E2-A8FAD493DBF2
    • cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      36FD0831-3F07-4550-8A88-642FC94B7D33
    • Dominique
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      217729C8-D81F-4E93-A3CB-C3EC49184512I  found it very difficult! Need more practice... the hardest bit is how to show the difference between details of the object (coloured lines on the apple) and the hatching to show darker zones.
    • Claire
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Nope. I think I'm kind of thick on where to use the shadowing. I'm fine on a bit of fruit, but say something with feathers? Gak!20210710_213010
      • Arleene
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        I enjoyed your tomato on the vine
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      C9405762-799C-4C0F-AFF3-7AE55E016185
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Yes, it was fairly easy.  I am feeling comfortable.
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 57
      I am a little more conscious of the six different techniques in sketching for added dimension. Practice will perfect the technique. I sketched the bufflehead, the crow and a small bunch of  red grapes on a dish. IMG_20210706_130734IMG_20210706_084853
    • Julie
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Yes, I’m feeling more comfortable. The course encourages me to draw more frequently and, as with anything, the more I practice the more comfortable it becomes. I like the way the course offers a step-by-step progression. I’m familiar with some of the topics & techniques, but the way each builds on those that came before provides fresh perspective. Also, by focusing on technique and tools the results become secondary. This frees me up to experiment and learn more.
    • Jenny
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I'm starting to feel more comfortable.  I've been noticing the lights and darks in nature more.  I'm still working on making marks to represent those lights and darks.
    • Catherine
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I am definitely feeling more comfortable putting marks on the page, and the squint test is VERY helpfulNorthern Cardinal. I tend to rely on hatching and scribbling, so I'd like to try expanding my experiments with cross-hatching, stippling, and blending. I have also been relying on photos rather than going out in the field, so now I want to try sketching in situ, perhaps in the early morning and evening when the light is from a striking angle to practice chiaroscuro as well. Patagonia LakeCactus Wren Nest
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 57
        I enjoyed your sketches, Catherine. I love the composition and I can see the different types of making the marks for added dimension on the cardinal, the lake scene and the cactus. KAK
    • Zoe
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Acorn Squash with natural light from the window. Imperfections are hard to draw! 8E7712D4-89D8-4BB4-8E1E-4B58EC8AA346
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 57
        I enjoyed your sketch of the acorn squash with its imperfections. KAK
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      IMG_0644
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
        It was easy to see the reflected light and highlights on smooth surfaces like an apple or pepper, but the orange was more difficult even with the squint test.
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 57
        I enjoyed your sketches, Janet. I can appreciate the fact that the orange was harder capture because probably the orange doesn't reflect much light but the stipple effect was a nice technique to use. KAK
    • Camille
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Artichokes Chiaroscuro The squinting technique definitely helped me to distinguish where the shadows fell on the artichokes and to not be as distracted by different colors. For example, the artichokes had purple, brown, and yellow on them in addition to shades of green, so squinting helped me ignore the colors and just look for light and dark. I used a couple of different shading techniques and that really seemed to help add texture as well as depth to my drawing. I want to keep practicing different shading techniques to create more variety of middle tones and also to get faster with shading overall.
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 57
        There is great detail in these artichokes, Camille. I enjoyed your sketch.  I feel like I can better by looking at other artist's drawings. KAK
    • Gerda
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      F55E935B-4259-496E-A9AF-8B34E4218612_1_105_c85E2D9AE-EA0E-4E66-BBEA-B4A042398CC8_1_105_c84429A7F-AB21-4C29-A3DA-2C5181C32316_1_105_c My observing skills are improving with you directions. so far I have just used the graphite pencils, except for the clematis that I had sitting on my desk. I used watercolor pencils. Will you please give me a critique and suggestions? thanks
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 57
        These are nice sketches, Gerda. I enjoyed both the shells and the bufflehead. KAK
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      While I see the light and dark, I have difficulty putting marks on the page to reflect what I see. What do I want to work on? Everything! Practice, practice, practice. BE79B13C-C4A2-4805-96BC-0E7ABAEB6262
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      SarahHunter ChiaroscuroI can see that the photographing accidently put more chiaroscuro on the page. I love this technique. This strawberry would be better in color.  :-)
    • Cristina
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      kiwis
    • Erica
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      The sketching part was easy but the blending and shading was a little difficult. Screenshot 2021-05-08 at 10.30.50 AM
    • Stephen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I have trouble with the overall shape.  I find drawing hard work.  IMG_0411
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        I enjoyed this beautiful drawing of your apple, Stephen. It made me want to reach out and pluck it from the screen and take a bite out of it. It looks so polished it is gleaming.
    • Lynn S
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      To work on ... value scales ... to "draw" out the crescendo!
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      img263
      • Carolyn
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        Finding it easier to apply skills being taught.  Shading is most difficult.  However, if I conscientiously practice "squinting" and light/ dark observations for a few days, I am confident shading will become much easier.  Notice that in all my drawings, I have a tendency to go too dark.  Will be working on that also.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_2090 (6)I'm beginning to feel more comfortable drawing or just making my marks. I need more work and practice but enjoy learning the new skills.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      81253673-E909-4E16-8576-079898B8630F
    • Judi
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_2170IMG_2155 Starting to feel a little more comfortable, although having trouble with lines. I get caught up in the lines and shadow and forget to focus on shape. I would like to learn to use lines to convey light, shadow and dimension. This will take practice.  
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Definitely enjoyed the exercise.  It is interesting the interplay of dark and light.  My situation was complicated by multiple sources of light.  I am getting more comfortable with marks on the page. 80DBB955-CE10-43A5-8010-EF5BAC8B56428D4C7E81-8F72-4729-B040-DCC374CE04CB
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        wow nice looking pear. I like your depth that makes the pear stand up off the page
    • Ingrid
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      image
    • Ingrid
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      • image
    • Ingrid
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      image
    • JOYAmusic
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Vive ChiaroScuro! Follow the spiral path of Spirit. Surrounded by scuro, I follow the spark - the chiaro of change. As in my pencil drawing, the balance of light and dark is not always easy to see at first - there is no ink pen boundary line - no point of Tao where light defines the darkness - truly shades of gray. I have been deep soul diving in the darkest tones of pain and grief and despair: a Cast Shadow of CoVid. Yet adjacent to it is the Reflected Light of Compassion and the knowledge that we are in this together. Now the Core Shadow of my fears is resocialization - my true emotions have been masked - a kind of protection soon to come off. My hope is that Spring may carry me through the Shadow of my day, so the Light of my granddaughter's smile will herald the Highlight of new beginnings. I follow the Spiral path to see beyond my 3D drawing and peer at possibilities hidden ..................................... on the other side. IMG_20210412_214804
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Beautiful poetry and play on words.
    • Himesha
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      • Yes, it was easy to see where  how to apply drawing techniques.
      • Yes, I'm comfortable in putting marks on the page no when sketching.
      • It's a little bit difficult to identify the dark and reflection light on some objects easily. IMG_7565IMG_7566
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I’m struggling with light and dark, especially at small sizes, getting the full range of value. Wonder if I should work larger? Use a harder pencil? — I’m using hb on these. Start lighter? Maybe my 70 year old eyes are part of the problem? Can’t see detail like I used to be able to. 6F786DDF-B428-4C10-A047-85A81A541B469F7E5A2E-C846-4F20-AB78-47AE6C5A1D0DAD42E57C-DB03-4276-9FF0-FEADD0F5B80B
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 40
      01A41B1A-F36C-45E9-8A7E-FBCB982F4505
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 40
      Chi 3-30-21
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 40
      B2CDDE75-C632-42CF-85D5-4BF81BE39E19I like to collect sea shells and beach stones.   I am  finding it is difficult to use the marks for shading and to create the real shape of the objects.  So I need to practice “making the marks”.  And I can see that I also need to work on on defining the darkest darks and lightest lights.
    • carmen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      chiaroscuro image
    • carmen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I am beginning to enjoy drawing, I’m beginning to see things differently when I look at them. I was captivated by this bluebird at the nesting box so I took a photograph and then drew this while looking at that.  I have a long way to go before I can remember something I saw and draw it later. This is fun. It wasn’t at first, it was new and intimidating. I want to work on how things fit together size wise and making things look three dimensional.image
      • Caitlin
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        Cute!
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Whoa, hold on Awesome dimensional nest box. And, to get the bird looking like a bird and sitting on the box. Chirp, Chirp, Hooray!
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      I am definitely more comfortable using these techniques with simply shaped fruit rather than more complicated shapes.  I think I need to work on using the different techniques together. Chiaroscuro Fruit
    • IMG_3613
    • Christopher
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      IMG_0689 Getting more comfortable with this medium. I do have a question: how do you protect your pencil drawings from smearing?
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      4DeerStudies This drawing I did of a fawn shows three dimensional effects - including the reflected light as the jaw turns under the head and the cast shadow of the head on the neck. I was careful to draw in the direction of the form. The original drawing is a little more distinct and the darks are darker. The scanner lightened and blurred the drawing a little. I'm sorry  don't have Photoshop now to correct it.
    • IMG_1836
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      This was a good exercise and also challenging.  Will continue practicing to develop 3D skills.  I found the lemon difficult but the pear was a better attempt.  28022E72-031A-408D-8FF5-B69C1B123855D5216EF6-8884-4FFD-A26D-034DDA4842B1
    • Emma
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      D2645760-F4F5-436A-9580-BC4F8A461D8C This was fun! I like working with shadow and adding 3D effects to my drawings. I drew a banana and a tangelo. :)
      • Emma
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        Fun fact: after I drew the tangelo, I ate it! :)
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      I followed Fuller's course [and all the info her more experienced students offered], work as she suggested and have fun, be comfortable and not be too self critical. I've enjoyed what I gained, so far, but I've yet to complete the class. Since summer ends in central New England rather quickly, my perennials will survive. The last time I was able to sit outside with my sketch book and watch the birds enjoy that view I was able to do some planning for what was to come. Then the world [except for the birds I can feed in the winter] went wacky. Holly
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Thanks. Holly. It was very thoughtful of you to give us some very helpful tips. I have my 19 year old cockatiel taking the class with me.
    • gary
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      5C5DA79F-0E82-408F-A6CD-795042D61F27
    • Natasha
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      I always thought that the difference between a tight conifer cone and one from the same tree that had opened up had to do with when they fell off the tree. These two drawings are of the same cone on two consecutive days. Bringing the cone inside, where it warmed up and dried, made it start to spring open. Much more of a challenge to draw! I still haven't gotten the scale patterns very well, and need to work on its looking cylindrical, but it was fun to try drawing the differences. IMG_0279
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Pinecones can actually be used to tell the weather. That is why you are having the spring open problem. Just get it wet again. That should help. When the weather changes, the pinecone will start to close up, if it gets cold or wet it will snap tighter then a drum. Happy drawing
    • Jeff
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Wow!  My attempt was with a cluster of Bananas. Here are some take aways. 1)  Dull skin not very reflective. 2) Indoor lighting cast three shadows. 3) The natural green around the stems was difficult to differentiate from the shadow , at least it was from this noob drawers stand point. Drawing image was saved PDF so couldn't upload.  I will convert the image and share in the next couple of days.
    • Natasha
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      I'm having trouble finding the right balance between drawing and suggesting detail. On my pine cone, I found I couldn't actually draw what I saw--it just seemed too complicated. So I sketched it pretty quickly and I'm fairly happy with how it came out. I labored over the oyster shell, though, and got all twisted up trying to find the right degree of shading to suggest the contours. Not very happy with the 3-D effect of the barnacles. Anybody have any thoughts on how I could capture their depth better?oyster shell with barnacleswhite pine cone
      • Natasha
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        oops. I realize that's a Loblolly Pine, not a white pine.
    • Robert
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      IMG_1064YIMG_1065Initial attempts at 3d object. Moon snail.IMG_1066Another attempt at 3d with an apple.
      • Natasha
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        Like the apple! I think you have also hit on the perfect way to draw something fuzzy, like a peach or a tennis ball.
    • Isobel
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Light and Dark drawings My first time drawing a 3D object! I have never paid attention to the light and dark values of anything before, so it was fun to see everyday fruit and veg from a different perspective.
      • Natasha
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        You got the shine on your tomato beautifully!
    • Natasha
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      I was pretty happy with this fat little lemon. It had a really shiny skin, which made the shading a little easier to get.lemon
      • Jeff
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        Nice drawing, Natasha.  You locked the 3D effect down on this one.
    • Natasha
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Capturing the shading on something that's highly textured was a challenge for me. Each little nub on this Oosage orangesage orange fruit had its own shading, which I don't think I was successful at getting right.
    • Natasha
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      snail shell
      • Natasha
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        I had trouble with the translucence of the shell. The little light patch at the left margin is where the bright light coming in from the right was shining through the shell. It's a little odd to see light there, because that's the side in deepest shadow.
      • Jeff
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        Another awesome drawing.  Congrats again, Natasha.
    • laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      904B5677-DB7C-4E7D-9E46-04024584B3E4_1_105_c It looks like a walnut! It looks like a walnut! The tip about practicing with fruits and veggies is a game changer. Too cold to take the journal outdoors this weekend. 1.4 degrees F tonight. I think I will stay with the nuts, seeds and produce indoors! Sticking with the various methods of shading, understanding value and practicing chiaroscuro for a few weeks will keep me occupied and feeling more confident. Thanks!
      • Natasha
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        I love the way you captured the texture on the walnut. I think I get too bogged down in the details of texture. You've done it by simplifying the shading and irregularities. Nice!
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Also w/ my .005 Micron, a white breasted nuthatch creeping down a tree (from a photo).nuthatch on grey
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      I had this textured paper left over so I had a second go at using my .005 Micron to sketch (from photos) a blue headed vireo. vireo
      • Jeff
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        Very detailed and realistic.  Great drawing Mary.
    • linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      • 26A5D2F3-ABEC-4999-81DC-54D8B0C8BF15imageimage
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        Very nice! And I like your use of red lettering w the pencil drawing.
      • linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Sorry for the picture of doll’s tea party. that was an accident.
      • laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 34
        You know, my favourite part of this photo isn't your skill, your dedication to capturing the light/shadow at various times, your use of shading/value/chiaroscuro on your beautiful little leaf...  No, my favourite part is capturing all of this at your dining table while your child enjoys a tea party. You have, perhaps unintentionally, provided her with a model of what life-long learning looks like. Modelling the learning of something new, the ability to 'play' with new skills as they develop. You are also modelling a love of the natural world and a sense of wonder and appreciation of the "mundane" leaf or a simple apple as well. For your course-mates, you are also modelling for us the essential need to carve out time for ourselves in our all-too-often busy lives; you are balancing motherhood with something just as important- your own beautiful self. Thanks for this lovely photo.
      • Jeff
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        Terrific drawing skills, Linda.  Great to see your journal notation too.  Bravo!
    • Matthew
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Northern Spy Apple. It was hard to do the shadow and the reflection of the apple. IMG_E5496
    • Reinhard
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      lemon1 (1 von 1) Nice exercice, for me it was difficult to get the tight textures
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      I enjoyed using my Micron .005 pen to do a lot of mark-making. This was done from a photo - I think my shadows/shading are off. But I'm happy with some elements of how it came out. white breasted nuthatch
    • Janine
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      I still need more practice with light and shadow, and making objects look 3-D
    • Janine
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      WIN_20210111_17_06_48_ProI drew this damselfly from a photo I took - trying to get a 3-D look with shadows
    • Janine
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      WIN_20210111_16_52_54_ProI had some trouble with the shadow especially.
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        I think this came out well. I'm curious about where your light was coming from. It seems strange that the highlight would be on the same side of the apple as the cast shadow.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      I was ready to jump to the next lesson, but have made a conscious decision to stay with this lesson for a while. There is so much to practice and there is plenty of time with covid, so I am trying to take my time and hone some skills. A few photos of my journal. The camera does strange things w the lead drawings.garlic 1garlic 3
      • laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 34
        Love this! I just bought my first set of watercolours- haven't even opened the package yet. Don't even know how to use the tubes of paint! But this is just so inspiring. I'm sure it will take me awhile to get to this level and that's okay! Just loving your garlic!!! And also the way you did your paint test squares and the examples to show the thickness of the pens you uses (sorry, I don't know all the technical terms for these things). Microns. New vocab for me too! Cheers.
      • Natasha
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        Mary, are those B&W garlic drawings done with pencil? They look like watercolor. They are lovely!
    • Carmen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Learning to observe shadows and light is quite the skill! I definitely see how it helps bringing three dimension to the images. It is hard to combine the dark and light colors at the same time. I am enjoying practicing and learning in the process.image
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        Nice work on your sketches.
      • Natasha
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        I esp. like the banana--you manage to capture that firm, smooth texture of the skin nicely.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      A Pink Lady apple. The whitest white is not really popping. chiaroscuro2
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      The thing I find challenging is dealing with smudges. And keeping the whitest area white. This drawing used an internet photo for reference. chiaroscuro
    • Heidi
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      20FF58CB-1319-4847-9429-B5985385E6E3Mark making techniques help provide depth to this plant.  I was struggling with that.  I’ve been returning to this plant to record growth as I am working through this course.  Both the continued practice and learning the skills have made a positive impact and I feel like I am improving.  It helps that the amaryllis is quick growing so I see change easily.  I like incorporating notes along with my drawings which I haven’t done in the past.   The notes make recalling details easy and I am becoming more observant when I can note down what I see and feel.
    • Cecilia
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      103_0018
    • Lindsay
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      value
    • Mwangi
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      IMG_20201223_095108 Always struggled with shading, learning alot so far. Especially about looking for tonal variations.
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      image
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      The chiarosuro is a new concept for me. Especially the reflected light.
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      image
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      image
    • Christopher
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG-2258
    • Judith
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      appleI tried to capture the apple twice, once with light coming from the left and once from the right and above. The cast shadow on both are too dark, I think, so that' s something to work on. The highlight on the left one doesn't need to be outlined--I just need to keep it blank. These are definitely my best apples ever!
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      IMG_0358 It has been quite educational and relaxing some of the techniques instructed, moving from stick people to be able to put something in paper is an accomplishment ; improving observational skill also very nice, Thanks.
    • Sherrie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      20201206_102815
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      image
    • monique
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      IMG_5376 Struggling with the shape of the shadow for the orange. Also, not sure if I used the dotting affect in the picture, should I then use it in the shadow as well?
    • monique
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Funny, I have been sketching for years but was oblivious to the reflective light. This is quite an eye opener for me. Enjoying the learning process.
    • BARBARA
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      wow 2nd version is better! I think recognizingnot a lemon what I was unhappy with in the first drawing was what led me to be able to make the 2nd one better.
    • BARBARA
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      frustration!  It didn't look right. Oddly enough when I took the pic, the more contrasty pic looked better to me.  I used contour shading and it didn't give the look I was going for.  I remember somewhere in distant past that the SHAPE of the deep shadow is the same curve as the object -- is that true? I will try it again with same lemon and different contrast. I really liked one of the pics below where stippling was used - will try to add some of that. My blending perhaps made the pic too "muddy" with insufficient different between shaded areas.20201128_151820
    • connie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I found myself quite frustrated after my first trial drawing garlic with cross hatching. I tried again with contour hatching, and although the second trial did turn out better, I gained a lot more understanding with how light and shadows fall on each clove. I LOVED using garlic for this exercise. It was a very fruitful experience (pun regretfully intended). I do feel much more confident in marking. I look forward to studying different subjects, and getting a better understanding of how light falls on different objects. I'd also like to eventually work on some other marking techniques like cross hatching.
    • Caroline
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Not sure where to put the shadow but I am pleased with what I have learned. My sphere looks like, well a sphere!42C8FAA3-C4D7-45D1-B698-48F353BBBCBB
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      IMG_0432
      • David
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        This is my view of a Bosc pear of which we have a lot this year in the local market.  I did note the reflected light, which I have not thought of as much before.
    • Becky
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      I definitely want to continue practicing capturing light/dark and dimension.  I have an easier time with this when I am drawing one object, as opposed to trying to represent a landscape outside.  Practice will help!Apple and Pepper
    • Candy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      20201108_192208
    • fullsizeoutput_63ebIMG_7246 I found it easier to create the various light and shadow areas of the sphere than it was with the irregular round shape of a shallot. I used hatching, cross hatching and contour hatching along with some blending to try to achieve the roundness.  I struggled with the shape of the shallot as it was harder to pick out the components of chairoscuro.
    • J Daniel
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I still don't find anything easy about drawing.  I believe I still have much to do to overcome a perfectionist trait in me.  It's still difficult to narrow the gap between what my mind wishes to do & what my hand does.  It's not comfortable finding oneself in the midst of this struggle; but I'm not giving up.  I will continue plugging along...  rather--scratching along.
    • Tiffany
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      imageI tried to find the easiest image to draw- a lemon.  The highlight was obvious, regardless of the angle and so was the cast shadow.  I struggled with shading the values of light, shadow, and cast shadow.  Cast shadows look like a band of darkness, and I seem to struggle with which direction to shade.  Blending with my finger helps cover some of the harsh transition lines as I try to practice the different pencil pressures.  I don’t feel comfortable yet, but I am not afraid of the page anymore.  I want to try and sketch and journal everyday to improve.
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        I like the way your sketches are looking. And your labeling is excellent.
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Still lots of exploring to do with the different techniques. Would like to excel at chiaroscuro : )B500814B-21EA-4D00-97D2-61DCDACD7057
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      PXL_20201021_210628369_3
    • Norma
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I'm starting to get the shadings and seeing the dark and light. Right now I would like to work on the pressure of my pencil... It seems to be another level of shade and light.
    • Johanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I am definitely a beginner at this!  I wonder if I should somehow draw in the general outlines first.  When I do not do that I find that I get involved in one small section and make too many marks so that, in the end it looks kind of muddy.  Also, the drawing tends to get lopsided or out of proportion. But, when I draw in the outlines it makes it hard to do highlighted edges.  Still working on the types of marks to use for different textures too. IMG_8577IMG_8576
    • J Daniel
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Of all the new techniques you have put forth for us, I like most the BLENDING.  At least for me, it has a nice way to cover/hide many of my sketching sins.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      3 D lesson garden Not always easy to identify the different values .  Trying to squint to see more clearly.
    • Cindy
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      I'm still a bit frustrated that my drawings don't look exactly like I would like them to look. I certainly can see how the shading could work just am not quite there.
      • monique
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        Just keep practicing. It will!
      • Marissa
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        Don't worry. A new concept can always be a bit tricky at first. If you keep working hard at it, it will turn out! You can do it!
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Harder than I thought but hopefully you can tell it’s a spaghetti squash. Something I want to keep practicing and observing.
      • Marissa
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        It looks like a spaghetti squash to me. Good job!
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      A5C98760-8D69-42B2-A780-B3E3D0A96BF2  
      • Cindy
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        Nice! Love the detail on the stem.
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 3

        @Cindy Thanks

    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      ChiarscuroI understand much more how to use light and shadow to create a 3D effect.  It seemed like a mystery or some artist alchemy before, but now I see it is just a skill of observing the basic shadow elements.
    • Marta
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Chiaroscuro_marta_24.09.2020 I loved to learn the mark-making techniques, the value scale, squint test and chiaroscuro. I'm fascinated by how much ligh and dark can transform a drawing that, at first, looks "plain" (not 3D)! I need to practice light/ dark more, though! I find it much easier with sunlight, during the day, than drawing at night with artificial light; that's what happened with this banana. I'll give it another try, during the day :)
    • Maria
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      WhatsApp Image 2020-09-15 at 3.49.14 PM
      • Johanna
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        This is interesting...I will try your scale as it helps to see how different techniques show lighter and darker.Thanks!
    • Caroline
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      I can't believe how much progress I made in such a short amount of time. Applying the various techniques doesn't come natural (obviously), but I really enjoy the process of thinking hard and also making mistakes. I'm very excited and I feel more confident with each try. IMG_0027IMG_0028
      • monique
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        Great job on the apple.
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Chiarosco Drawing 2 Struggling with the actual drawing and making it look real. Working each day will hopefully improve that. Also need to work light to dark
    • Hilary
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG-8376I really like the techniques you showed us. I like the options of using the hatching, stippling, and blending. The Chirascuro is hard for me to do. At first I couldn't even see it, but now I am starting to. This is something I need to work on.The squint test has to be the coolest thing ever!!
    • Kimmai
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      IMG_4141 The mid tones, seem to be my struggle. I have a heavy hand and removing pencil can be an issue.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      imageI found it interesting to practice the chiaroscuro technique both outside in natural light and inside with filtered light. The notes from this lecture were very helpful.  I was pleased with my drawings and more comfortable capturing the light. 
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      image
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      25F86C82-036A-450C-82A7-E7C469CA85A0 58AB5726-A2D2-436A-A492-AB78AB3CBBF7   It was difficult for me to capture the gentle curves of a tomato and still show light and shadow.  It had so little actual contrast that too many lines seemed too many.   It seemed overworked.  Not a good subject for this topic.  But the idea of chiaroscuro is excellent.  I liked the cloud attempt better.
    • Lumi
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      I don’t find it the hardest thing to find the shadow, highlights, etc. I am getting a bit more confident using various shading techniques, like cross-hatching, that I have used before some. I think I should work on making shadows a bit darker, so the highlights seem lighter.image
    • Peggy
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I can recognize the highlight, light, etc. Blending the different light is difficult. I an not a natural.
    • Bridget
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      This course is AMAZING! Whilst I'm not exactly confident nor super comfortable making the first marks, I now feel it's okay to start and that I might even be surprised by what's possible. This is an empowering and exciting feeling! I loooove blending as it's so forgiving, I was surprised by how good scribbling can look and how simple hatching can be so efficient when there's limited time. Wow. Who knew I could draw a chilli?! IMG_20200814_193033
    • Jessie
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I still have trouble with depth perception in getting proportions correct, and do "just some more here" with shading that it doesn't always get the light quite right to look 3D enough to me.15963053461596573721324329073229
    • Jeff S.
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Since it's a rainy day, I chose to draw an exotic ornamental just outside my home.  The intricate pattern of the scales and the harsh indoor lighting made it a bit more of a challenge. Deodor Cedar Sketch-JS FYI:  This tree holds a special place in my heart.  The top is dead and makes a great perch for Merlins, Coopers Hawks and Great Horned Owls.
    • Victoria
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      I have really enjoyed my drawing practice, I usually work with colors not only in my paintings, but also in my Photography. Going back to the basics is like opening a window to when I was younger and I sketched everything I saw.IMG_2729IMG_2721
      • Hilary
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        This is amazing!!
      • Caroline
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        Wow!
    • May
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      While looking at objects trying to capture each on 2-D paper, it was a bit challenging to decide which mark- making technique to choose. When the pencil touched the surface of the paper, it kind of depicted shapes and tones swiftly. I found it really nice to experience each technique by itself, then compare and contrast between drawings. It helped to draw after Liz to get a since of the techniques, looking at her drawing and then looking at mine, then work on a new drawing while putting techniques together. It was hard at the beginning. It took time. Yet, the result was rewarding. The stippling is the technique that needs more effort because the dots sometimes had a tail to it. Sometimes when  lifting my pencil  it sketched a  mark showing a spot that looks like a tail to the dot.   IMG_9362IMG_9363IMG_9365
    • Denise
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      onionapple Really fun. Such a good teacher. I'm learning lots. Needing much more practice.
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      IMG_20200722_110049 Wonderful course, I'm learning a lot! In drawing this onion and pair of magnified coffee beans I too was chasing shadows (similar comments below). Not so easy to capture the chiaroscuro effect on the round onion... I'm pleased with how the drawings turned out all the same.
      • Gari-Anne
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        I love your detail on the onion skin!
    • Adella
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      This is my first drawing course. These new drawing skills were helpful but challenging for me. They definitely made it easier and as a result I feel more comfortable. I would like to work on chiaroscuro & finding shadows. I found the pineapple very challenging to draw.
    • Adella
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Chiatroscuro
    • Raymond
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Banana for posting
      • Johanna
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        I like this banana!  It has so much energy.
    • Amie
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I actually found it relaxing drawing a 3D ball. I'm not new to art but it's still a good reminder to go back to the basics sometimes, I tend to forget about the reflected light.20200630_175646
    • Gigi
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I must confess that life got in the way of continuing with the course as I had planned, but cheers to coming back. eggWanted to share a sketch of an egg from back in March. I remember feeling like I was improving and I am excited to continue to practice and actually take my journal out in nature. My journal is pristine and I've been nervous to break it in, but it is happening - taking it on my 3-day backpacking trip starting tomorrow! Nature sketches to come!
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      I still want to work on everything! But I took my first-ever drawing class in the fall and was introduced to most of these concepts. So I was not completely uncomfortable or unfamiliar with them. My goal is 'not pathetic.' IMG_3577IMG_3578    
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I still struggle with value - my range seems to be medium dark to medium to  medium light - I don't get the contrast I'm looking for.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      I tried using the marks and very much enjoyed the exercise and it was fun to walk around looking for objects.  I found it challenging to complete my drawing before the light changed.  I realized I was chasing shadows a few times.  I walked around the neighborhood squinting at everything, I looked like I needed a new pair of glasses.  I took my glasses off and I get the natural blur so I can see the lights and darks without squinting.  I just have draw blind!  I need to work on seeing the shadows and getting the right proportions. Pat20200614_162517 (1)
    • Claudia
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I found the techniques very helpful although I am working in a small scale which I imagine is easier. I have trouble with the squint test IMG_4213but I imagine it is a question of practice.
    • Since we are limited to 3 images per reply, thought it would be better to share the ones I had  issues with.
      • IMG_6620 Sketching with a continuous one line gave me a sense of confidence. On the other hand, the sketchy lines technique hindered me; the more I sketch a new line the more I hesitant in visualising the shape I wish to sketch. I faced this problem while outlining all of the subjects: the daisy, the acorn, the gingko and the butterfly. Have you faced the same issue, anyone?
         
      • IMG_6622 With the type of marks in sketching -- I sketched a blue sea crab; luckily, I found a dried one. I divided it into 5 parts to experiment with the marks ' types. I'm sharing the result with you. I'm not sure if I did well with the marks -- I tend to use tinny tip of the fine-liner pens; 0.05 and 0.1. Perhaps I need to try and sketch with a thicker pens/pencils to see the difference.
         
      • IMG_6628  This is my attempt to try and look at the shades of a subject. I tried with this shell; Ancilla Glabrata. I used an artificial source of light instead of the sunlight - this shouldn't affect the result much but looking at the final result, I think if I was after the shades, then I should have tried to sketch it with one pencil colour.
      I believe the most useful point on this session was the squint test. It is very practical when you don't have enough time and you needed to sketch and pin point the highlights n a subject much faster! Thanks for the tip :)
      • Leon
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        My continuous line outlines came out better than my sketch line outlines. One line looks much more confident but requires careful observation.
    • Sally
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I like to use the scribble and spotting technique. The blending technique is what I probably use most. I find the crosshatching the most difficult to achieve what I want. DSC08599
    • kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I enjoy sketching and the lesson on contour and shading was very helpful to me. The 3D part of it will take me quite a bit more time to learn.JC ContourJC lesson 2 Lighting
    • Vicki
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Having never taken a drawing course, I've never actually learned any of the techniques in the "Making Your Mark" lesson set.  I found, however, that I remembered hearing many of my watercolor mentors talk about stippling, hatching, blending, and the like, when referring to the consideration 0f value as a means of infusing light into a painting.  I'm now feeling a little more comfortable with using value observations and techniques to help make a shape seem to be 3-dimensional.  MakingYourMarkLessonSetI started with "Drawing Basics" on February 23rd, after posting my Yellow Warbler entry, did a bit more on the 26th, then didn't return to finish the lesson set until May 20th.  Now it's already June 2nd and I'm only just posting this entry.  I tried to apply the techniques of hatching and stippling recently, when I was drawing some rocks.  It takes SSSsssooo... long to draw a rock as a sketch the size of a postage stamp on paper.  I really do KNOW that practice makes perfect, and that I should practice every day.  In real life, though, it's not possible - especially not in the current state of world affairs, when I find myself practicing child care all over again with my grandson, while his parents are telecommuting because of the COVID 19 pandemic.
    • Duane
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I feel pretty good sketching, I tend to use multiple textures and finish up with blending. I could still use the pencil more and make hard lines.IMG_4094IMG_4095
    • Liliana
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I’m starting to feel a little more confortable with lights and shadows without color. I still think my drawings are too light. image
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I really like the stippling and blending but my son likes to use cross-hatching and contour hatching and we're both enjoying practicing the new techniques together!IMG_4403IMG_2099
    • Priscilla
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      The more time I spent the more I began to see how to use the different marks. As in the last assignment, I began to see the differences in values as I drew...training my eyes I guess. One of the most helpful ideas was how to use the "flower" dots to apply stippling...thanks for that!Nature sketch 1
    • Deb
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      15898080706906954410735416924966
    • Anne
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      After six months (!) of neglecting this class, I decided to get back to work.  I've been having a great time today picking it back up, and am pretty happy with the results.  I think I need confidence in making darker marks, and just overall practicing for confidence. I couldn't resist adding color and ink to this one, where I was practicing values. IMG_3371 Chiaroscuro is tricky!  By the time I got to the blueberry, I think I was starting to get the hang of it.  I found a good black & white photo with strong shadows to use for practice. IMG_3374   berry
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 44
        Hi Anne. Your blueberries are gorgeous and the use of chiaroscuro in it makes them leap off the page. It took me a long time to practice as well with the darker lines to get comfortable. You’re right about it being tricky.
      • Anne
        Participant
        Chirps: 5

        @Colleen This is something that will require continued practice.  Moving on to something that isn't round is a bit intimidating to me!

      • Deb
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        Anne, I like that you made a diagram of Chiaroscuro. I think that will be helpful for me too. I am excited to move on but I think some more time with this lesson will help in the long run
      • Anne
        Participant
        Chirps: 5

        @Deb Thanks Deb!  I'm hoping to get out into my yard to practice this in a natural setting.  Definitely a skill that will take a lot of practice!

    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      IMG_8284 I had to laugh when my husband told me my eggshells looked like hamburgers.  I experimented several more times, but have not quite mastered (well, not even close!) the values that make such a difference in definition for sketches.  I know what I need to do, but can't quite meet the goal yet.  I'll keep the lessons learned in this section as I go along.
    • Marjolaine
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I am amazed to see improvement in my drawings with the few cues I just learned. The chiarocuro really helps in giving a 3D look. I was aware of that but was not comfortable applying it. To me, there was only 3 shades. Dark, mid, light. Also, I was not that good at seeing them. I never noticed the reflected light under the subject. Amazing! I still wonder how to combine chiaroscuro and the rendering of colors. But one thing at the time. As for the filling strokes, I don’t have the patience of doing straight lines or crossed lines... and it looks ugly when I try it. I would say that my technique is a mix of scribbling and blended lines... I don’t know if it is good or not but I have more fun drawing like that. 2C1C8B60-49EB-4E22-B27F-F964321BB881FD0AFE35-FF80-482E-9CFF-9B23A99B3139                                      
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 44
        Hi Marjolaine.  That’s awesome. I can see how the stokes make the detailed feathers in your drawing. That’s something that I just have not seemed to figure out yet. Thanks for sharing this.
      • Marjolaine
        Participant
        Chirps: 8

        @Colleen Hi Colleen! Thank you for your comment! Drawing the feathers is a big challenge for me too. The interesting thing is that I was not trying when I drew this grackle. The only thing I was focusing on was the chiaroscuro. I scribbled with the pencil... using some blending and some contour sketching too, but in a very rough way. But you are right, there is a feel of the feathers texture after all... it is a surprise for me! Your shells are very stylish, I love them!

      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 44

        @Marjolaine Thanks. I am noticing that the chiaroscuro is making a huge difference in my drawings.

    • Colleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 44
      00FF19CB-6D50-49A4-9833-6F311175CEB6 It was a little bit. I am feeling more comfortable putting marks on the page. I still need to work on feather features on birds.
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Your lines are so sharp and detailed.  You have composed almost photographic images here.
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 44

        @Cynthia Thanks Cynthia for your comment. I feel much more comfortable with using chiaroscuro in my drawings, but sometimes I feel that I am pressing too hard (almost imprinting) or should add color, which is not something that I am currently confident about. I was pleasantly surprised with this one when I did it.

    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I found this very challenging but was amazed how the grapefruit took shape. Its a relaxing exercise to closely observe such everyday objects.  I found this time of day( late afternoon)the light changed quickly so I just had to pick one and go with it. 70ED222E-21B7-4ADD-A467-EAAA68881178
    • Les
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Not to say I am proud of everything on this page, but I am excited that I filled a sheet of paper with my learning. IMG_0256
    • Michael
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      It is really like a revelation for me to define the chiaroscuro concept into 6-7 distinct zones. I was already aware of some of it, but to put it all together so neatly is great. 20200504_104530
    • Lucyna
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I'd like to work on the perspective.
    • Carree
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Here are some of my random sketches of things I have easy access to. The elephant on the bottom of the second page came out cuter than I thought it would. InsectSketches
      • Azurekat
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        I love the animal skull! The nail/iron spike is pretty on target also. Elephant is cute! Good work!
    • Morgan
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I'm a perfectionist and often don't start things because I can't decide the best way to go about it or the best thing to draw or whatever. One reason I wanted to take this course is to draw more things without my own restrictions on whether or not it's a "good" subject, or if it's going to make a "good" finished piece. I used to work in an art museum and I did drawings and wrote in sketchbooks a lot over those years, and I have gotten away from it and want to get back. driftwood_butternut
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Hi Morgan,  I see so many different kinds of mark in use here and the values are so clear.  You skills are still with you!
      • Morgan
        Participant
        Chirps: 4

        @Cynthia :) thank you!

    • Azurekat
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Chiaroscuro2 I really had to force myself to relax. I found that once I did relax, things went much better. I like the shading process.
      • Christa
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Love how you included the objects and your sketches.  Nice!
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      I found this hard - it takes patience to observe the nuances of the light. Something I am trying to develop. image
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Sort of ok. Needs tabletop for context, so it isn’t  floating in space like the ghost of tomatoes past.D9F69687-02F5-4EAC-9016-6425137312FA
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      tomato and chiaroscuro nture journaling It was fun trying to get the lights and darks right. As I was drawing the light started changing and the highlights started shifting around. More practice would be good! I liked the explanation of how to look for the lights and darks and where you may expect to see them.
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Hi, Ruth. Your tomato is beautiful. Maybe it has some eggplant in it? Your vines and stalks are especially interesting and it’s the way that you include unexpected details that draw the viewer in and make your drawing come to life. ❤️
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      snowball bush looking north nature journaling Taking the photo of my drawing made me realize that I would like to practice getting more definition in the middle values. I like the way you pointed out that when you squint you may be surprised by some of the bright and dark spots. I also kept smearing the pencil marks as I was drawing (haha...accidentally blending where I didn't want blending).
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Hinoki & Pansy drawing Nature Journaling I keep forgetting about using stippling and I love the daisy technique you showed us. I still want to work on ALL of them!
    • Amanda
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      sDhNBb7uR0Gmul+%w7OPyA First try at chiaroscuro.  More successful in pencil than colored pencil, I think.  The contrasts on the pepper were much more dramatic and yet I had trouble capturing that.  Maybe because it needs more blending?  I like to look at what others have done and I saw some comments that others felt their own drawings suffered in comparison to others.  When I feel that way, I remind myself that comparison is the thief of joy.  We will all improve and as someone else pointed out, we are not all starting from the same place on the path.  I am enjoying re-discovering this part of myself.
    • Paula
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Value Stick Representing Lights and Darks: the Squint Test I continue to have to make conscious choice each time I set out to draw: discouragement and frustration, or discovery and curiosity. It is not easy, but is a valuable skill. Drawing is completely new to me, and I find it more than a little difficult to make accurate representations of shapes and proportions.  I can see where and how they are wrong, but can not replicate them. It is an interesting look into the brain.  Meanwhile, I have now dedicated a full sized new eraser to my drawing box! I am also very slow. It would take several more sessions to "finish" my stick (which is how I did my "Jump Right In" warbler), but sometimes I don't want to spend repeated sessions on one drawing.  If you are slow and outdoors, the light changes faster than you can capture it. However, the squint test really works! Sometimes squinting helps me "find" the shape, as well. I added a scribbly background of a tree trunk, palo verde sapling, brush pile, and bird boxes, which is not actually behind my "value stick" but was to my right. You can do that when drawing, unlike photography! (Photoshop not withstanding.) I hope my skills improve on shapes and proportions. Next up: chiaroscuro.
    • Leonora
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      image
    • Leonora
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      7202638E-ABB3-4CA5-974B-6C6C23012306
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        Hi Leonora,  your chieraschuro is very well done and informative.  I love the red onion and the pepper, nicely done.  The colors are outstanding and the tiny details add so much to making them appear real.
      • Ruth
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        I like the way you have used all the different types of marks so effectively, and the way the objects you drew are positively glowing. It is interesting how just bits of color really bring the drawings to life.
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Thank you for sharing your drawing.  Your notes make it a lesson in itself!  I am so interested in the way you used all of the different marks!
    • Jeanie
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      70EFE9E4-79A2-4BC4-9AE6-0C2392DF2FDE
    • Bonnie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      (Still haven't been able to upload images) It wasn't difficult to see where each could be applied and I'm starting to feel more comfortable doing anything!  Unfortunately, I think I chose natural items that were too complicated for my initial practice.  The areas of light/dark were too small for me to really distinguish the different effects - kind of frustrating but interesting - so instead I applied different shadings to a stuffed toy penguin to build confidence.  Better. It is still tough to maintain proportions, even with short pencil strokes.  I use the eraser a lot.  I expect everyone comes up with their own process - where to start, what comes next, etc.  My question - are there guidelines about this for starting out? I am really enjoying this course.
      • Paula
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        Yes! I had to choose my "Light and Dark" objects carefully to keep it from getting too difficult!
    • adriana
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Vegetables
    • Stefania
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Actually, I don't feel comfortable putting marks on the page. The chiaroscuro is not really clear to me and i feel rubbish about it. I have seen the others are they are really good, while mine is a bit ugly Apple
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Please be gentle with yourself, as we’re all on the same journey. Some are farther down the path and some not as far as your are. We all started at different times and different places. The very fact that you have committed to taking this class at this time shows a determined interest and desire to create art. Just stick with it. If you don’t understand a lesson, message our instructor and ask her for help. She can refer you to other available sources (maybe a YouTube video or a website) that may reinforce the particular skill or lesson that is challenging you. Sometimes your progress may seem minimal. Then one day, you’ll make a big leap. I’m rooting for you, Stefania.
      • Paula
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        As I've said in my own posts: EVERY time I sit down to draw, I quickly come to the point where I have to make a conscious choice between frustration and discouragement vs. discovery and curiosity. It is not easy. I have to tell myself "I can do it!" Meaning I can make the choice, not necessarily draw what I set out to draw. You have captured the round nature of your apple, rather than having it look like a flat circle. That is a success! You, too, can succeed in making a positive choice!
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Hi Stefania, I agree with Paula and Leonora.  There are people in this class with much higher skills than mine, but we need to keep that from discouraging us.  Like Paula, I have to tell myself, "I can do this!"  I have to practice, and as I go I will see more, and refine my skills.  So will you.  Your apple, by the way, looks like an apple.  Check my "eggshells" which to my husband, look like hamburgers!  The chiaroscuro is very hard for me too.  We'll see and understand it better as we practice.  I'm rooting for you too!
      • ANDREA
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        I feel just like you! Over and over I remind myself I am a beginner and my drawings are those of a beginner and that is OK! My doubts make it more difficult right now, but what if I conquer this? better yet, what if I learn to enjoy this? What if I am the best mediocre nature journalist I know? I'll take happy over perfect any day.
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24

        @ANDREA Andrea, I love your take on this journey -  "I'll take happy over perfect any day."  I'm going to say that to myself every day.  I really am so happy when I 'm drawing!

    • Lynne
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I began with the pear, using a 5” circular fluorescent bulb for illumination, which gave a strange shape highlight. I then moved on to the juggling ball with the same lamp. The Roku pot was illuminated with an LED point source and the texture of the pot resulted in a second shadow below the reflected light.image
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      This was an excellent exercise and the video clips are great. Thank you for the mention of the blending tool. I had forgotten the existence of it and after a search, I found one in a box of drawing odds and ends. I love it for making smooth lights and darks. 9D6A705E-896F-41AA-B0EE-B03D95744470
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      KingfisherHouse FinchI have been working with pictures, trying to  improve my skills.  I think I am improving.
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        I’m so impressed that you dove right in and are already drawing such beautiful birds, and in such detail! I especially find the  birds’ wings and feathers difficult to draw. But, you seem to have mastered it with an understanding of the biology and technology of how the wings and feathers move and work . . . not an easy feat. Bravo, Nancy!
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        The feather work is so beautiful and varied.  Thank you!
      • Connor
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        The feather detail is amazing! And the proportions are great too.
      • Janine
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        Wow- your bird looks really good! I have such trouble deciding/drawing feathers.
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Having difficulty following through with posting. Finally figured it out. Will get back to drawing again.   Don’t know if I’m posting on someone else’s page or mine
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      image
    • Val
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      FEC592DC-1A6B-4F89-BD2C-417DCC35AB9A3121AA68-4ABA-4B45-999E-028069D89620
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      B9391F98-E70E-41CD-860C-9A362CA0881E1FB02042-5CB9-4107-B0A7-B4DFF225C993AA436786-49C5-4A62-9B0A-4D7C104149DDI I really enjoy watching the instructional videos - thank you, Liz! And the exercises are great, so helpful.  Getting the texture and the lighting and shadow are ALL so challenging, but I realize it takes LOTS of practice.  Very inspiring to read and see everyone’s posts!
    • Connie
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Such a good “looking” exercise!image
    • Giuliana
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      I'm definitely starting to feel more comfortable, but I'm working hard on chiaroscuro because I still feel that is quite hard to distinguish the lights and darks on an object or composition
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      4CD43E79-34CB-44EA-A2F0-E7963989A588
    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      It is clear that all my skills will be needed to sketch realistically! I need a great deal more practice I think before I can use both light value and 3D markings both accurately and relatively quickly. I think practicing all techniques together will be the most useful for me. It is gratifying to see tiny improvements!IMG_5327IMG_1284
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Oranges are hard to texture.  But I think this shows Chiaroscuro, the 3D, I am not as sure of.          I thought I submitted this last night but don't see it this morning so if it is duplicate, I sorry. Orange  Chiaroscuro  040820
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      How can I show an area of whiteness that occurs at the edge of the object?  It becomes white on white page!  I'm am becoming less hesitant to open my journal and am enjoying the exercises.fullsizeoutput_6fd
    • serena
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I'm getting quite comfortable, but it's still a bit hard to find the reflective light.WIN_20200408_12_19_01_Pro
    • Eliana
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Yes it was easier
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      I have been working from photographs because I find I can see the light better.  The fur on this vixen was a challenge.  Tomorrow I will try some realVixen  040720 fruit.
      • Eliana
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        O M G that is soooooo good! I love it keep up the good work
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 19

        @Eliana Thank you Eliana. I would love to see your drawings.  Nancy

    • Dorothy D
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      IMG_7243 I am always using value scales, still life set ups with my students to keep them in practice depicting every day objects. I use pencil,charcoal and graphite with them so I ache for color at the end of the day for me sometimes. I think I need it just to give me another challenge. Still learning....
      • Carol
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        Love these and feel like I could just slice right into them and see the juice come out! I am amazed at the way you used color - makes them look so real. I started looking at the discussion posts before learning the content here, but it’s hard to imagine myself ever getting to this level!
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Your color work in this painting has so many lessons!  Thank you!  It's gorgeous and alive.
    • ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      image
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      I am really enjoying drawing,  I am getting much more comfortable with the process.  You make learning these skills controllable.  I am so glad I signed up for this class. 20200407_072132 oak leaves 2
      • Anna
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        Love the fluid movement you’ve managed to bring ti these leaves. Very inspiring. Thanks
    • Holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Chiaroscuro 4-3-20I
    • Rafael
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Yes, thank you very much. I send this example.DSC00309
    • Leah
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Now that I have practiced a lot, I have gotten used to knowing where different skills should be applied. I am definitely a lot more comfortable now with these new skills! So far I have done great with all of these exercises, so I am ready to do more!
    • It us easy to see which components are being applied.I am starting to fell more comfortable using these techniques, that said i do think I need to work on the core shadow. ]IMG_20200330_173915
    • Lynley
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Have been doing a bit more practice with capturing the light values of objects, I think there is some improvement! and I feel more confident of putting pencil to paper to create an image. Drawing Basics - Light & dark-practice sheet2Drawing Basics - Light & dark-practice sheet3
    • Lynley
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Drawing Basics - Light & dark-practice sheet1   Have been enjoying playing with the texture and getting the light & dark thing happening.  This is a start but lots more practice to go!
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Hi, Lynley. Your Value Scale is so well done, and I like the way you used the texturing techniques that we’ve been practicing on your scale - wish I’d thought of that! Your drawings are all so nice too. I especially love your little cardinal peeking onto the page. Keep up the great work! 👍🏻
    • Matt
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      IMG_5937 It has been a long time since I've done much sketching. It is coming back to me though.
    • Suzy
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Attached is my zombie looking face with a tangerine, tomato, and carrot. I noticed taking a picture highlighted the shadows even more. I went back and added in a few more shades using the photo. Practice makes perfect. I would like to get better at conveying the different textures. Chiaroscuro
    • ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      image
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Fabulous! 😁
      • Jeanie
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        That’s awesome!  I hope you get some more TP soon. Lol
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        What a delight!  Thank you for the good laugh, and the great drawing.  I love the folds especially.  The soft lines really define the winding of the paper at the top.  I'm so impressed by how few lines can be as important to the image as the complex set you have for the folded edge and the column.
    • Juan
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      photo_editor_ds_1585090200309
    • ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      image
    • Suzanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      IMG_6964More work needed on texture and shape. Enjoying the challenges of this course. This is especially nice since spring is here and there are many possibilities for practice outside.
    • Judy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      sketch 1
    • Gigi
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Here is today's tangerine. Left side drawing is the flipped over fruit.tangy
      • Paula
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        My favorite eraser! I use them for erasing all the terrible markings in my opera parts! (I am a professional flutist.) Now they have another purpose...
    • Gigi
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Enjoyed this lesson and realized I needed more practice with simple shapes before moving on to actual objects. Practiced spheres repeatedly and today will try a piece of fruit! Mechanical pencil made it hard so I switched to some drawing pencils I had on hand. Have not played with color yet. It was cool to see improvement in a short amount of time (first on the page is top left and last one is bottom left). shadowslights
      • Aaron
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        I love this idea, I also need to practice basic shapes a bit.
      • Carol
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        Thanks for sharing this progression, Gigi. They all look great to me, but now I can really see the difference from first to last!
    • Jenny
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      IMG_4675
    • Aaron
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Does anyone have advice on distinguishing between texture and light/shadow? I find I struggle to include both elements--light and shadow serve as texture in many of my drawings right now. Any tips would be appreciated, thanks!
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      4B9DBE4C-7473-4E65-AA15-0FB9DC6AB26C
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Clearly need to practice *looking* for chiaroscuro gradients. It helps to formalize the six components. 4BDE3968-DE26-496B-B407-8ED11ABBF0A7
    • Aaron
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      orange Liz, or anyone, do you have any tips on how I can adjust my stroke so that my lines aren't so evident, if that makes sense? I can really see each stroke, I'm hoping to blend it a bit more so each line stroke isn't quite so evident.
      • ANDREA
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        For me, I find when I make lighter lines (lighter pressure) it works better. For darker, don't press harder-put the lines closer together.
    • Mudito
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      imageI found this whole section extremely enjoyable.  I learned a lot about drawing, especially the specific techniques and the demonstrations were so useful.  I am very much looking forward to adding colour.  It is a challenge for me to draw things so small.
    • Koen
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      2020-03-13 fossil Sea Urchin I ventured to draw  this fossil sea urchin, I found in a quarry near home. (Original on the right side of the picture). The rounded, but asymmetric shape and the delicate scale pattern were quite a challenge to draw. Because the  light on the table was diffuse, I mainly used blending for the surface shade  and I added a layer with  with the scale pattern in contour shading style.  This is the style I would prefer for this type of objects with subtle  gradations in shade. I can imagine that other shading stiles may be  more suited for more dynamic objects with sharper contours and color contrasts.
      • Aaron
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        That looks great, @Koen!
      • Koen
        Participant
        Chirps: 16

        @Aaron Thanks Aaron!

      • Connor
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Great fossil sea urchin! You have inspired me to do more drawing.
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      For the aplication of the different techniques of drawing I think I can understand it. And I tried to mix the different techniques in the same drawing. My cross-hatching is a bit rough, my lines tend to overlay on top each other not giving the subject good definition. My 3D benefit from the blending. I just really feel this very helpful. 89722667_1672852826189869_3989003296235847680_n89844176_585326548730336_5050121953654865920_n89836711_2940185822714249_1486378148378443776_n
      • David
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        Just two more... If you feel I'm pushing please feel free to delete it. Thanks 89763839_767982866943301_4367369857516175360_n89970401_928718307584088_474679257272942592_n
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      Even fooling with lacy curtains helped in this class IMG_2713 (2)
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      image
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      image
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Amazing how light plays a role!image
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Always have difficulty differentiating between light and dark and colour! I need to do more of these drawings! 0BAE6BC6-F344-4B23-9953-ABA703F2ED5B
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      I think I'm improving but lots of practice will help including color.Screen Shot 2020-03-09 at 9.00.45 AM
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Working on my skills i find that some of the pencils I have are too hard.  I need to do many more of these practices before I finally get it.  I'm going to try an apple next.  I can't seem to soften the areas of highlights to make it more realistic.  Screen Shot 2020-03-08 at 9.16.53 AM
    • Geminis
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      20200305_172429
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      Shells and rockI tried various shading techniques to capture the 3D aspect of these shells and small stone.  The squint test didn't really work very well, as all three shells are white.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      Mark-makingI'm interested in working on more natural objects gathered from the field.  The squint test is interesting, but how does it work on objects that are all white, such as these three shells?
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Please tell me how to submit a drawing. It doesn’t appear after I upload no hit submit.
    • Toni
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      FD1435E5-9C45-4B97-84BC-20F83E5DA97E
    • Toni
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      8A366DDD-9030-4632-9929-FF87D2B78328I’m really struck with the importance of value in creating a 3 dimensional drawing and giving definition to an image. Need to work the most on patience and not feeling overwhelmed by a complicated image! “Where do I even start?!”
    • Mayumi
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      IMG_2761 It is hard to make the area of "Highlight" stand out. It is also hard to keep pencil light for the area of "Light."
    • Dianne
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      D0475ECC-CE68-4A8B-9F74-23226BFBF5B6
      • ruth
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        wow that pear is beautiful!
      • Gigi
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        Super impressive! Have you been painting long?
      • Roxanna
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I think I am in love with this pear
      • Carol
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        Same reaction! Awesome pear!
    • Dianne
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      4E6B4626-E77A-42D0-8C86-6BA41C4BEFEF
    • Dianne
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I haven’t drawn in awhile. It’s fun to do this again. I think it’s easier to show chiaroscuro with watercolor than with the mechanical pencil. I’m going to try to upload some of my pictures.6E6DB26A-3365-4F7A-BB78-B424B843A7C3
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I used to do all kinds of “pointillism” (stippling) drawings, so I’m familiar with that one, but that takes a LOT of time and concentration, so I can’t see doing that in the field.  And for blending, I need a much softer lead in my pencil.  So, I ordered some 2B lead and some blending stumps.  I tried different techniques with simple shapes, like the apothecia on lichen.  I liked using the pencil more than the pen for most of the techniques.  I found that I tended to MIX the techniques depending on the density of the shadow and color and the texture of the lichen. shading techniques4 I am feeling a bit more confident about laying down shapes and doing shading, but I know I'll need more work to get comfortable with it in the field.  I need more work with fur and feather's too as they seem daunting.  Drawing things likes eggs and lichen seem easy in comparison.
    • Juan
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      When I started was deiffilcult but then easy. I am feeling more cornmftable with my new marks. I wanna work in the chiaraoscuro. image0
    • Laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      9876705E-C8F1-414D-AE78-4DCAAC7A6A76 This exercise was very helpful. Until I squinted my eyes, I had difficulty discerning the light and dark.
    • katie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      719FD446-70F8-4EF2-8156-2BB18F19B17D
    • Deanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I still have some work figuring out what marks are best to depict shadow and light. I've been drawing my cat and while I don't quite get the proportions right, I think I have been able to capture the texture of her fur. Chiaroscuro is something I still need to work on especially the subtle gradient from light to dark and figuring out the shading to capture the shadows properly, but I am awfully happy with how much I've progressed so far, as a total beginner.  The posts by others are both intimidating and inspiring but I love the openness and willingness of everyone who posts for sharing. It's truly inspiring to see what others are sketching. IMG_4640IMG_4645[1]
      • Sally
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        Wow, Deanna! I think you're doing great. Especially on the cats-- I've always found them difficult. She's a pretty cat, such neat markings.
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        Hi Deanna, nice job on the cat, especially.  I've been drawing my cats over the years and they don't generally come out as good as yours.  well done!
    • Curt & Jeanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      sketch2 A small container and two odd rocks. The first rock had some odd dimples and depressions, the smaller rock had some fossil impressions which I found difficult to express on paper. Hmm, should have done the shadow on the container..
    • Sally
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I wasn't sure, but a couple people were able to guess that it's a tomato. 20200215_110812 Then went back and did the bufflehead for practice. I'd like to try this one in pen. Someday. 20200215_110719  
      • Christy
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        Nicely done! I really like the face and that eye!
      • Sally
        Participant
        Chirps: 5

        @Christy Thanks, Christy. I'm enjoying getting back into drawing, but have a long way to go!

    • Paulette
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      my chiaroscuro looks like a sad attempt at a baseball cap :)  Looking at the posts below I am too embarrassed to submit mine--I guess I have a long way to go.
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        Paulette, I know how you feel. My tomato looks diseased. We just need to keep practicing.
    • Jann
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      (whoops, submitted twice)
    • Jann
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      200209 chairoscuro As I started sketching outdoors, the light kept changing as the sun came and went behind clouds which changed the nature of both the light and highlight on the fruits and the shadows they cast, from strong to very diffuse. I am still exploring what marks give what kind of results, feeling far from accomplished, but getting a bit more comfortable.
    • Beth
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      image
    • Melanie
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      IMG_7684   lots to learn!  It just feels so good to do this.  I think the garlic is more recognizable than the squash.  Actually, it amazes me when something is recognizable at all!
      • Sally
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        I like the style you're using here. Captures the subjects nicely.
    • Karla
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      IMG_6837
    • Belinda
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      IMG_0435IMG_0436IMG_0423
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        Hi Belinda,  I really like the energy of the drawn circle especially.
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      It's easier to see light on some object better than others. For example, highly textured items seem to absorb more light and takes a bit more observation to discern the light and shadow. I am getting more comfortable with marking the page. I haven't sketched in a few years, but it's starting to come back to me. This course has been a big help with refreshing my memory. I'm comfortable with hatching, cross-hatching, contour hatching, and blending. I need to work in stippling.
    • joyce
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      image
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      IMG_0841
      • Carol
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        These are wonderful images, and I love how you labeled each one with the type of technique so we can see the differences - thanks!
    • MELANIE
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      First attempt at chiaroscuro: red pepper in late afternoon sun.  Difficult to make it look like it was sitting on the desk vs. floating.  Any suggestions?  Second attempt was red apple with 2 different light sources. What is wrong with the late afternoon shadow?  Is it at the wrong angle?  The sun came from the upper right.   It was great to use the squint test for light values  and to look for highlights in the shadows, which I noticed on the apple as well as on the desk surface.  I need to work more on using different textures in my drawings. 20200111_15591720200116_185809
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      The techniques are helpful. Surprisingly, squint test really clarifies values., helping to sort out value differences from color differences.  I never noticed the reflected light part of shadows. The shadowing will take a lot more practice to blend and catch subtleties, but the shading techniques help a lot. This is a start!8CC0D498-6C96-405C-A040-05A795E2DFF1
    • Tanis
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      DSC02249 This partial paper wasp nest is one of the hardest things I have tried to draw and represents some of the problems I am still working on: how to make the central leg appear farther away, how to get a 3-D appearance while including the markings of the nest and how to make a bowl appearance where the top is off. Using cross hatching and dots along with hatching has been effective in other drawings. Contour hatching is something I want to work on more. Liz's videos are super helpful and these discussion groups are inspirational.
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        But, it totally looks like a wasp nest! Beautifully rendered and bravissimo!
    • BJORN
      Participant
      Chirps: 60