• Judy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      this was an enjoyable first attempt. I also enjoyed seeing the work of others... E327F05E-5BA2-4582-A564-F7015E452A74
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Enjoyable for sure.  It will be a challenge to capture the image I want to but love the idea that this will call me to be more observant.  Seeking to deepen relationship with the natural world around me, and this will help me pay attention and notice.  That said, getting the proportions was a big challenge and the shadings.  The bill took several takes too. yellow warbler exercise
    • Jeannie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      pat rotateI spent an hour drawing and painting this bird - and while I’m really quite happy with it, I’m not going to do much drawing or painting if it always takes this long. I hope that speed and getting-it-right-the-first-time are some of the skills I learn in this course! Also hard to imagine trying to capture a bird in the field; good thing my interest is more in plants. ☺️ I enjoyed the idea from one of the journalers about letting your subject jump out of its box a little. Really fun effect!
      • Kimberly
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I agree!  I'm excited to learn techniques that will help with speed and accuracy of observation--right now I can't imagine drawing a hopping bird that would be gone in a few minutes!
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I found getting details of plumage difficult to get right. Also the lines were not as clear as I would have liked - tried 2H and HB, also a 0.35 Rotring pencil which is what I have. Will try and get the recommended pencil.
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
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    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      It took me a couple days to finally attempt this assignment. I don’t draw, but I want to change that. Nothing came easily. I’m not sure I would have noticed the different shades of yellow, the bird’s legs or the differences in the feathers had I not been drawing. If actually journaling in nature, it would be difficult to see many details since the bird would have been in motion and even the branches and leaves would likely be moving. 234EE19A-9B37-479E-92F3-037F552736C8
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      Drawing: It is a record of your visual image of the object(s) you are observing. Photos:  Real specific accuracy such as proportions, dimensions, details, colors (most of the time), etc Challenging: Proportions, and feathers Probably would not have noticed the details in the area where the wing feathers meet the tail.  img255 edited
    • Kevin
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
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    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      1.  It took a few days for me to decide to do the drawing - not sure why, but I think I had some fear that it would be difficult or challenging.  In the end, I enjoyed drawing from the photo and looking at the detail of the bird.  I noticed the details of the feathers, the shape of its various parts.  I was challenged by the proportions, and the surrounding details.  2.  I would not have noticed all the details of the feathers had I not been asked to draw the bird.  Nature journaling, I hope, will allow me to notice details that I might miss otherwise.  I'm wondering especially how to capture bird details from my own observations rather than a photograph.   IMG_6379
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1. I enjoyed trying to draw. It is fun to really look at the details and try to recreate them in the sketchbook. That said, the bird in my drawing is too small and its shape is different from that in the photo. Putting the branches in the space was easy but drawing the bird was difficult. There is a lot of detail in the bird from its orientation on the branch to its individual feathers and I did not get those details correct in my drawing. 2. When drawing the leaves I noticed that they were attached alternately and I definitely would not have noticed that if I just looked at the photo. I would have glossed over the blemishes in the leaves as well. So drawing something really improves one's observational skills.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_20841. I  loved drawing from the photo because it allowed me to observe all of the details and take my time. It was a challenge to include everything and keep my proportions correct.  2. My focus of course was drawn to the bird which allowed me to observe the details including the placement of the toes on the branch. I probably would not notice the alternate veining of the leaves or the details of the lichen on the branch if I had not drawn it.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      1 - I LOVED drawing from the photo.  I didn't have to readjust my perspective.  But this isn't really my goal.  It was easy to see details. Challenge was to get relative proportions.  2 - I definitely noticed much more than I would have even if I had been able to look at a bird for the length of time it took to do the drawing.  I noticed the layers of feathers better than I would have in the field.  Noticing these things from a photo will enhance my notice of details in nature.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Drawing from the photo let me take my time.  If I had seen this bird for just a few seconds I might not remember much detail.
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I like drawing from a photo.  It helps me to see details and colors.  The bird was relatively easy to draw but the feathers were challenging.  The tree branch with the moss and lichen was challenging also.  I don't know how to shade within a leaf to make it look realistic.  In fact, I don't know if I would be able to notice those details without the photo.  yellow bird
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      So many different shades of yellow! Explored mixing colors, some disappointing, some surprising. Sketching took forever as I have had little experience. But it does look like a bird... Looking forward to learning how to achieve some of the things I saw and attempted.
    • Nicole
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      This was my first attempt to draw a bird! And I was surprised how much I enjoyed doing it. I do hope that the yellow warbler will have better proportions at the end of the course! Coloring came the easiest. the shape of the beak I would have not noticed as much. a very good first observation exercise of a bird. Nicole
    • Eleanor
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I like drawing from a photo. I wouldn't have noticed all the details and shapes of the birds and the leaves if I hadn't drawn it. IMG_20210414_142302388
    • carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I don’t know how to load drawings or photos of them. I am happy to have drawn a yellow warbler that is recognizable as one. - I’d love to know how others got a feathered look using the recommended water colors. My red streaks are pretty crude.
      • Elizabeth
        Bird Academy
        Hi Carol, To post images in a discussion, click on the "Insert Image" button located in the top left of the reply text editor (the box where you typed your comment), and then select an image from your computer or your phone. Then click the "Submit" button.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I had a difficult time getting starting on this exercise, and I spent a lot of time thinking about it before beginning.  Then, when I did start I found I started with the branches, drawing them in and then making the bird fit the branches, which I also found difficult.  Once I was working on the bird, though, it became easier.  I blocked in some rough shapes and worked from there. Having the photo allowed me to take my time and pay attention to the details.  There was grey shading on the head, back, and shoulders that I would have missed if I wasn't asked to draw the bird - subtle coloring and shading became more noticeable, as I worked on the drawing.  When nature journaling, it's nice to be able to get all those details, but I think I'd miss a lot of them.  Having that photo helps to keep those details to reference when drawing. Yellow Warbler1
    • Terry
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      A good exercise to look at the detail in the bird and it's surroundings.  I noticed his head was more cocked and I missed that part in my drawing.  Proportions were hard but I'm assuming that takes more practice.  A decent beginning but I think I will have to focus more on the details.
    • Beth
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I like drawing from photos.  they sit still. :) I find it difficult to get the shape of the bird right.  and the bill.  But, it was absorbing to look closely and draw and time fell away.  That is my favorite part about drawing/art.
    • Anne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      First time I ever saw a yellow warbler—or at least had one pointed out to me—was in the Galapagos...the start of my semi-serious birding adventures. So it was especially cool to see the sample nature journals from those wonderful islands. 265C1DC0-7739-4B0C-AAD6-3AA40286BD27I love photography and take lots of pics of birds and nature. I prefer drawing/painting from my photos vs real life, so I wonder how these two dynamics are going to play out as I start nature journaling, I’m also super self-critical about my drawing & painting skills. Hope that the lightness and flexibility of journaling is liberating for me. This drawing begs for color! Can’t wait to learn out pointers for incorporating water color into this process.
    • JOYAmusic
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Yellow Warbler As I listened to the recordings of the Yellow Warbler while drawing in my journal, I recalled when I first investigated them last summer. They were visiting my garden on the Eastern migratory corridor of the Rocky Mountains. Bright flashes of golden lightning issued from the flocks of American Goldfinch that dominated. But there was something shy and sweet that emanated from the bushes. The male came forth with a muted, almost avocado green on the back - darting out and then quickly in the dwarf wild plum bushes. Sitting still - stop weeding the cilantro and basil - soon he invites his mate to join him on the dill flowers where hummingbirds have been flitting about all day. Will they be nesting? It's a noisy place in the city - just glad they came to visit. No Photos Please - they are much too shy and quick. But their picture will stay vibrant in my memory of the sunshine the Yellow Warblers brought to us that day. My journal entry was at a very relaxed pace, due to my reflections and inspirations. In the sketch, I was able to appreciate each part of the bird's anatomy, as I thought of its flight and song and purpose. I will add color later when they return this year- late June I hope. yellow warbler journal
    • Cindy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I wasn’t sure if this was suppose to be done with a lot of details. Since it was a photo and I could keep referring back to it, I could have taken a lot of time. I chose to do a quick sketch, not a lot of accuracy or detail. I find it easier to draw from a photo because my mind can focus on just that. D53D6DFF-15C7-4C7C-920E-4EF8D41EA738
    • Leopold
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_3535-1IMG_3537 For me this was the first time using watercolor for something this "complicated". After finishing the bird I got a little impatient and didn´t put that much effort into the branches. After a while I figured that the paper I was using wasn´t quite watercolor-friendly. My mom joined me in drawing the Yellow Warbler, you can see her result above as well. I´m very excited to draw this picture again at the end of the course.