• Breanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      You can see the progress throughout my 4 attempts at the bird - at first I was drawing every change in shape literally (as per the feather back humps on Attempt 1). My husband is a professional artist and we had an amazing date night drawing the same things together. He would point out what I got better each time, and show me on my own page how the movement of the shapes changes in the bird. Certain things make or break whether or not it's recognizable as a warbler or even a bird lol. I'm glad I recorded the suite of increasingly competent attempts, it shows how even 1 hour of work can change your skills a little! IMG20240114141716
    • Annie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1. Getting the proportions right was challenging, especially around the head. I also had to keep getting myself to slow down and keep looking at the whole figure from time to time. 2. I wouldn’t have noticed all the details and colors in the feathers, beak, and legs if I hadn’t drawn it. I think this would be really hard to draw live. IMG_8541
    • Tina B
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1.     It's easier to draw from a photo than real life. My sketch of the bird turned out better than I thought it would. I tried not to dwell too much on it. I got my basic sketch done in ten minutes. Later I went back and put in more detail … and later superficially painted it. 2.     Definitely. Drawing from real life requires keener attention / observation. I know that drawing from real life is going to be more challenging … as there’s the 3-dimensional aspect … and the light … and that real life often moves, often quickly. E.g. birds. The bit of light in the bird's eye—I think I would not have noticed that unless drawing it. warbler
    • Debbi
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I never would have noticed the ‘ring’ around the Birds Eye had I not tried this sketch! Love seeing the detail!IMG_0135
    • Eilene
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      It's certainly easier to work with a still image. I felt I was able to get the shape of the bird about right. Coloring with watercolors requires more patience than I can usually muster. I tend to have too much water and not enough pigment. And I don't match colors well. IMG_8478b
    • Leslie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      image I started by sketching the branches, leaves and finally the shape of the bird. So much to learn! Getting shapes right, how to mix colors & get fine lines without bleeding. I found the whole process very meditative and could have gotten lost in this first project for a couple of hours. Will continue to practice mixing colors, and then will work on filling in the branches, leaves, lichen and moss. 
    • Jamie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Great practice getting out the watercolors again! Still assembling my kit, so when I sat down I didn't have a pen or pencil nearby. I get bogged down in the tools too often so decided to just push on with the watercolors. Proportion was tricky as was letting go of details. I paid a lot more attention to shapes and colors than I would have without drawing it. YellowWarbler copy
    • Geneviève
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Last year I took Jane Kim's How to paint Birds class so I had previous experience with this kind of exercise. I started by drawing the tree branches and leaves to situate my bird. My principal challenge was about proportion. Also, without colour, the contrast becomes very important so I did some shading too. Birds are challenging because they move constantly. Even when trying to photograph them, it can be very frustrating. With nature journalling, I guess I will have to "remember" the image of the bird and draw it from memory. Knowing the shapes and colours of different bird species will help, I suppose.  I feel it will be more like capturing the essence of the moment and less about making an accurate rendition of the bird. IMG_8660
    • Joanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      imageJust wanted to have a shot at using the paints, hard to get colours right, hard to get dimension right, but fun to start the new year!  Drawing from a photo easier than trying to draw a moving subject. The birds in my garden don’t like to stand still. Plants may be easier
    • Evangelynn
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      • imageNot confident in using the tools or in drawing. I only used the mechanical pencil. Can they be refilled? That’s how little I know. Hoping my observations will improve. So now I will go back and try again using the watercolors.
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      cornell online Lesson 1 It has been awhile since I've worked with watercolor.  For this I used watercolor, colored pencil, and graphite pencil.  Getting those small details and determining the best tool to achieve what I want was the challenge for me.  I did notice small details of the way the wings and feathers overlap from the photo.  However, I'm not sure I caught as much of the "life" of the bird by using a photo.  However, photo was good to get an initial orientation to the bird (not moving).
    • Tia
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Drawing from the photo allows me to look closer at the details I did not notice at first, and to better understand the proportions. I spent a lot of time erasing and "measuring" proportions with my pencil. The basic shape came relatively easy but I found it challenging to get the warbler in the right angle. I was frustrated by the beak, the feet, and especially the paints once I started the painting - especially when it comes to representing texture (of the branch, the feathers, the moss, etc). IMG_0740
    • Gabriel
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I always struggle with proportions when it comes to drawing. I think the feet look a bit small on my drawing and the head is a bit elongated. I enjoyed drawing the feathers and getting some of the smaller details in, however. I might not have noticed the small patch of gray on the nape if I had not been asked to draw it, not the extensive black feathers of the wings. WIN_20231227_12_18_37_Pro
    • Catherine
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      IMG_0827I thought getting the smaller details, like the beak and the feet, was hard, but it was fun to watercolor. I liked being able to go back and erase and continually look at the picture.
    • Kimberly
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      IMG_1591
    • Brenda
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Yellow bird 1
      • Brenda
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        I found drawing from a picture a lot easier than drawing from nature. At least I could draw and redraw and the bird wasn't moving at all. The thin lines were the most challenging as was trying to get the beak correct. The coloration on the branch was also annoying.
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      20231126_153411II I appreciated that it was a photo and not a moving bird.  My drawing took a lot longer than that bird would have sat there.
    • Louise
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Pas facile! La forme de l'oiseau a été dure à saisir et la texture des plumes me donne du fil à retordre.  Je n'aurais pas noté toute la richesse des couleurs du plumage, seulement le jaune et les rayures rouges. Peut-être que j'aurais dû faire une esquisse au plomb plutôt que d'y aller d'emblée avec les feutres de couleur.
    • Carmen
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      DSCN1667 I felt that i wanted to get the essence of the birds spirit. His / her eye appears to be looking at the viewer and the bird appears relaxed on the branch. It was pretty easy to outline the birds silhouette first and then fill in the details. I think what can be challenging is drawing the tiny details of the feathers, branches, etc.  I think I would have just noticed the bird, not the leaves and branches on the rear side of the bird.  This lesson has made me more aware of drawing and including the birds, animal environment so that I can get a better understanding of it's surrounding.
    • Sharon
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      #2: The birds head is turned slightly toward the viewer, which I wouldn't have thought of while photographer, but had to  focus on this for drawing, and found it very difficult to achieve.
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      imageimage I felt challenged to capture the texture of the feathers and the branches. As I sketched I noticed more detail on the wings and feathers; much more so than just glancing at a photo. The concentration helped calm me down and provided a sense of peace.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      IMG_2704
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I much prefer using a photo now as it allows much more time to notice detail. Perhaps thru this course I will learn how to quickly catch the highlights of an object I’m drawing and be able to put it on paper. I have a lot of interest in drawing plants and flowers but, even they are hard to capture in the wind! I somehow got the idea we were supposed to copy the photo but I noticed many folks just did black and white. I guess I “jumped right in” and tried it all. That tree branch with the fungi was a challenge. I’m totally a neophyte when it comes to water color. All these mediums are overwhelming. Soooo much to learn!
    • Miz
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      By drawing from the photo I can capture details of the bird and the surrounding objects. I can take as much time as I want. Capturing the shape was easy, but difficult to express colours in black and white. I wasn’t focused much in the background when I was sketching but if you’re nature journaling you’ll see all kinds of other things around it, and I may be able to associate my journal with surrounding noises, smells and weather of the place.IMG_0178
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Drawing from a photo allows me to more accurately draw what I'm seeing.  In nature, the subject is gone almost as soon as I have spotted it.  The photo made the drawing very relaxing.  I felt like I was seeing the bird and the branch she was resting on.  While a photograph always has the details, it is not nearly as personal. The drawing is my perception (and drawing skill) of what I am seeing and what is important in that moment.   I hope drawing in nature will improve my attention to the important details.
    • alegria
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Drawing from the photo was easier than drawing from nature because you can have all the time you need, specially if you are drawing something that moves like a bird.    To draw the shapes was easy and difficult to make the shades and lights.   When you look at a photo first of all you get the central object like the bird, then when you start drawing there are details that show when you are looking for them, like the texture of the branches.  I think that when natural journaling you instinctively search for all of this textures, shades, colors and details.WhatsApp Image 2023-09-01 at 9.53.06 PM