• Kati
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      i like drawing from photos. it gives me much more time to study the detail, although i'm trying to stay loose. I find proportions the most challenging aspect, and i'm hoping this course will help fine tune my drawing skills. i would not have noticed the lichen at first. I think it's important to make note of those details in writing, as they do help complete the story of what you are seeing. IMG_8475
    • Sandy
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
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    • Montecito
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      1. I Liked drawing from a photograph, I could take my time to draw the details, the colors are more clear. I wish i could see the bird moving to analyze in a better way the beak, body, wings. 2.If I were sketching in nature, I would not notice details as the different colours, color of feathers. IMG_4492 (1)
    • Shyla
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_9178
      • Montecito
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Very nice drawing, you did a great job with the perspective of the wings. I like also the branch.
    • Karoline
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I wouldn't notice a lot of the details of the bird - red streaks, bill shape, leg color, black on wings - unless I was drawing or intentionally trying to ID the bird. I think a lot of people don't get into birding because they're never taught by anyone to look for that detail. I am not so good at drawing. I am generally satisfied with my drawing of this bird. I have the shape and proportions of the bird mostly right, which is really good for me. I did a much better job with beak shape and eye placement than I usually do. I got some details, but not many. I struggle with varying line weight to capture detail. I'm better at shading and blending colors. But - and importantly - I took a full 10-15 minutes to get a picture I was satisfied with using a two dimensional reference drawing that would have sat still for me all night if I'd wanted it to. That's why I am much better at drawing plants from life. They are happy to have you spend all day looking at them. Birds are not and I am terrible at gesture drawing. :)
    • april
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Though it was just a few minutes, taking the time to sketch, I noticed more or different things than I may have from a photo. The softness of areas, the saturation or dustiness of colors. The belly color just like the belly color on my cat. It is surprising how much I feel I can capture for myself with a simple sketch.
      • april
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        20191007_210521
      • april
        Participant
        Chirps: 5

        @april 20191007_213429

    • Stephen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_20191007_181547(1) Ok, here is my effort, I am banking on the hypothesis that the artwork gets better with practice.
    • Terri
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      So, trying to figure out how to post a reply is a bit of a challenge...frustrated that pencil doesn't scan very well.  Working from a photo is good and bad - great for reference when drawing but I also find it hard to capture the space around the bird as it looks flat.  Proportions were challenging but with practice that should improve.  I had never noticed how lethal the bird claws look, very gnarly and pointy!  Whiskers around the bill and delicate feathers.
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      fullsizeoutput_1af I think I need to learn to take more notes about the subject! This was a fun first exercise.
      • Elizabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        Impressive sketch! Good proportions.
    • Terri
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
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    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      imageI have drawn from photos before, it can be challenging depending on the light and subject. This little bird was easy because it was not moving and a simple shape with just a few other shapes around it.  A heavier background would be harder. I noted on my sketch the lichen and torn leaf that I probably wouldn’t have noticed if I had just taken a photo and moved on.
    • Carrie
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      It was slightly daunting at first, but then I really got into it - even though I know my technique is pretty basic and even I might laugh at it in the end.  I enjoyed doing it.  I had a very hard time knowing how to draw the branches.  More or less they are straight lines with no shading. I may not have noticed the holes in the leaves, the lichen or how the birds feet were if just looking at the photo and not drawing it.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      99023F05-69DF-437F-A1D9-EDCE1B1E0B6F Easier from a photo - I never get that close to a warbler and I had time to consider details. I noticed how the tail looks flat and how the toes wrap around the bottom of the branch.
    • Rick
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Pictures are nice, but drawing actually gets you into the lesson. The more I drew the more I noticed, the stripes, the grey shoulders and back. The lines in the wings, the subtle brown in the breast and belly. I did not realize how long the birds toes are either, they wrap completely around the branch. If it was just the picture I would have been takes by the yellow and perhaps not noticed the other colors of the Warbler. Drawing from the photo meant that you could draw the bird complete, in the woods you probably would not get a bird to sit that long for you to draw it.
    • Heather
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      1. The basic shape/outline was ok, but I didn't even bother trying color. The details of the feather texture and the lichen were definitely beyond me. 2. I don't think I would have noticed all the different types of lichen - I would have just noticed the bird, mostly its color. I probably wouldn't have notices the different textures on the bird.
    • gretchen
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Drawing from a photo is helpful as the subject stays still. If I had not drawn the bird and just looked at a photo, I would not have realized the feather patterns and the shape of the warbler , the chest area and head are quite distinct . The bright yellow color would have been the main take way had I just looked at the photo.
    • Therese
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
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    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      IMG_0982-1 This bird would have been long gone by the time I finished the sketch :-) Glad I signed up to get some sketching tips and practice.
      • Montecito
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Very good sketch, very accurate shape and volume of the bird.
    • gretchen
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      image
      • Elizabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        nice sketch, you really captured the essence of that bird!
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      • The colour and the markings were clearer in the photo and there was more time to add some details since the subject remained stationary  On the other hand I had trouble with perspective. IMG_4039
    • Vonda
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1. Drawing from a photo was easy because the bird didn't move. Getting the right proportions and details was challenging. WIN_20191007_19_40_40_Pro
    • Peggy
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      B4BD2B48-8BAE-4E21-9518-B2F8EB0F4A86 I enjoyed drawing this Yellow Warbler. It’s a fairly simple shaped bird.  The two things that I find challenging when drawing birds are the feet and the layers of feathers of the wing and tail. I noticed that this warbler and others I’ve seen in the field often look like they are leaning forward.
    • Nathalie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Too much attention to details, less spontaneity but noticed the leaves eaten away. ACDADC30-561D-4FA1-B05D-92BCECE7F0BC
      • Maidie
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        I really like the way you captured this bird! Nice job.
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Much easier to draw from a bird that's not moving. Warblers don't sit still long. Used mechanical pencil and harder to get shading correct and doesn't scan details well. Probably would not have noticed the shoulder mantle as distinct from wings or the coloring of it. Since there are so many warbler species and juveniles, male and female might have very subtle differences I would want to note all areas of the bird for later identification if in doubt.yellow warbler 1st bird cornell before instruction
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I liked the process of drawing, which pulled me to really look at the details of the bird, particularly the feather patterns. I definitely want to hone my skills so that I can better capture the attitude and overall impression of the bird.  I am overall more familiar with examining plants, and found myself distracted (in a good way) by the lichen-patched branch.