• Molly
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1. Easier to get details when the bird is still. Made notes to indicate color. really struggled with the bill and feet. 2. light and shadows. missed the red on the breast.20191008_112758
    • marie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      JOURNAL_2019-10-08_lesson1 - Copy
      • Tania
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I love your comments...
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 22

        @Tania Me too!

      • Rose
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        It never occurred to me to enlarge the screen for more details. My kids would only shake their heads. Love what you did.
    • Joyce
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1. Bill and head shape are difficult to get correct. 2.  The tree gave a hint to the time of year.   Once again I would not have paid attention to head shape and bill as well as field marks.  All these things are important for journaling and identification.   Birds in photos are not moving as in field.
    • Chris
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      IMG_0837
    • randy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      i was able to reflect on last lesson, mosty on using geometric shapes in sketching. i can certainly use practice though.
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      D50C90B8-66FF-465C-8EE9-C761E40EA321I didn’t mind drawing from a photo, but I tended to do a complete drawing vs a quick impression. I did like being able to enlarge an area of the photo and look at the details. I’d never be able to do that in the field. On the other hand I only had one point of view using the photo. In the field there would be more interplay with light, and field conditions versus a stagnant view. I agree with the poster that suggested putting a time limit on completing the sketch.  This is going to be so much fun!!
      • marie
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        Didn't think of doing detail drawings of parts...will keep this in mind for my next page...thanks.
      • Ann
        Participant
        Chirps: 4

        @marie You’re welcome, Marie.  I’m loving this course already. 😊

      • Coral
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        I forgot to draw details separately, as you did with the toes and eye! Now that really makes it look like a naturalists' journal.  Well done!  ( I'm going back to my drawing and add that in.) . Thanks for reminding me!!
    • Betty
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      I like drawing from photos to get details from the bird, butterfly or bug or whatever I'm drawing that you can't otherwise get from seeing it in the distance flitting across the sky.  You can get general information from looking through binoculars or from a quick glance, such as distinguishing that this bird isn't a gold finch from seeing the absence of the black markings. With this photo I can see that the tree must be an old apple or fruit tree due to the shape of the leaves and the moss and lichen growing on the branch. Plus I can see that the leaves look to be well into the season because they are dark green and a couple leaves have pieces of leaf material missing as though a bug or something took a bite out of it. IMG_0663 I have an old tree similar and I can get the information for a closer look at the actual branch to record a zoomed in section. The zoomed in portion of the first part of the lesson is something new to me.  I love that.  I can get a really close look at my tree and make an enlarged drawing of it to add to the drawing.          
    • Anita
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I like drawing from a photo because it gives me time to study perspective, posture & proportion.  The 3 P's come hard for me. I have little serious drawing experience & almost no art education.  I am learning, however,  to use negative space. I doubt I'll ever have nature journals worthy of publication,  but I hope to get to a point where while I'm  reveling in nature, I can record what I see & not get totally frustrated in the process.20191008_092054
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      It is easier to draw birds from a photo than in the field. the silhouette is ok, but the eye and legs are not quite right. One challenge is detemining the hierarchy of markings (feather patterns) and shading, especially with pencil sketching. look forward to learning to use watercolours in the field.IMG_0285
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      • Set a time limit as I tend to spends hours on a single f]drawing  need to ,earn to sketch and capture the essence .  Perhaps create a new habit of using more gesture  working from a photo is great for detail work but I can get lost in the detail,sometimes.  image
      • Sue
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        I tried so to get the moss on the main branch where the other branch goes up for the bird to perch.  I love the look of your drawing of that.
    • Alicia
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      1. With the photo I could study all the details at leisure and make corrections, which would definitely be a challenge with a real warbler... The challenge for me was to get accurate the small details of body shape, proportion; etc.  For instance, I made a mistake initially with the curve of the top of the head, and the way the forehead met the beak.  Plus, the paper in my journal doesn't take well to erasing, so I had to lightly sketch over these parts. 2. Drawing from the photo helped me see these details, while when sketching in the field I usually mainly see the "big picture" - the overall look of the bird, its attitude, etc.  I'm curious to see if this course will help me be more detailed in field sketching. Here's the drawing, first in pencil then gone over in pen: Nature Journal - Yellow Warbler Nature Journal - Yellow Warbler 2
      • Rose
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        Did you use pencil first and then outline with pen? I love the look of that, you get the idea of the subject in a quick glance.
      • Alicia
        Participant
        Chirps: 23

        @Rose Yes - I used a 0.4 water-proof pen to go over the pencil.  I planned on using watercolor for the colors, but I'm not too happy with the result... I have a lousy color sense, and I usually don't have the patience to get them all just right. Plus the paper in my journal probably isn't ideal for watercolor - it drinks up the water too fast, and makes the result blotchy. Maybe I'll use colored pencil instead... or maybe I'll stick to B&W! Nature Journal - Yellow Warbler 3

      • Rose
        Participant
        Chirps: 15

        @Alicia For having a lousy color sense I think it looks great! The paper used for watercolor does make a huge difference, and watercolor can have a mind of its own anyway. I’m really looking forward to what I can learn about them in this course.

    • Dawn E
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      warbler day 1   1) I got a late start on this but wanted to do the assignment, so made a fairly quick sketch.  One thing that was hard was to convey the contrast between the soft fluffy looking feathers higher up and the more sharp lines of black in the lower feathers.  Also, the angle of the bird was hard to convey: it's head seems turned from position of the lower body.  I hope I could have conveyed it better if I'd spent more time, but I wonder if I will have the patience to draw something very detailed. 2) I noticed many details after I started drawing that I hadn't noticed just looking at the photo:  the texture of the feathers, the different coloring on different areas, the way the beak attaches to the head, the eye, the claws, the lichen on the branch, etc. etc.
    • Alejandra
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_6697 I am so happy to be in this course. Drawing the warbler was so much fun!! I'm a photographer and I'm used to looking at details but I think drawing made me appreciate the gentle sloping lines and shapes even more
      • Christine
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        Lovely drawing!
      • PAMELA
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        I like this drawing very much.  I think you capture the personality of the bird.
    • IRENE
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      This took a while to draw.  Not really clear on the plant or leaves.  Enjoyed the process but it was bit frustrating getting the right proportions and angles.  Outline came easy but details more challenging. I don't think I would have the time to do this detail in nature because of the time and the changes in lighting and definitely the position of the warbler.  I didn't notice the lichen on the branch until I had to draw it.
      • Dorothy
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        Irene your drawing is framable!!!  Absolutely gorgeous!   Looking forward to seeing more of your work. 💕
    • IRENE
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Lesson_1
      • Sue
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        I love the detail here.
      • IRENE
        Participant
        Chirps: 6

        @Sue Thank you Sue.

      • daniel
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        I love the detail and value in your sketch.
      • Alicia
        Participant
        Chirps: 23
        Wow - you did a beautiful job; I especially like how you did the branch and leaves.
    • Rachel
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      A1604855-4473-48D6-A982-41D6F8C28739 Definitely a plus that it held still. I got lost in the drawing just like I used to, which was really lovely.
    • Dana
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1. A little bit familiar. The most easily part was drawing the feathers around the head and the challenging part was... maybe the back part, a little short the tail. 2. Yes! The brownish stripes under it's belly. I didn't notice it if I don't draw it.20191007_231844
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      As I have been practicing or I should say trying to practice drawing I wasn't too daunted by the warbler, I started out with the branch then begain drawing the shape of the bird, and added the details later.
    • Janice
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      IMG_51891. it was hard to start the body of the bird on a blank page. Using colored pencils for the first time was a challenge. Nothing was particularly easy. It was difficult making the warbler as beautiful on the page as he was in the photo. My eraser was terrible. Must get a decent one.
      • Rose
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        Look for a kneadable eraser with any artist supplies. Invaluable.
      • Janice
        Participant
        Chirps: 9

        @Rose Thank you, Rose. I took your advice and bought an eraser at Art Materials today. Here is my second attempt at drawing the yellow warbler. It isn't quite done, but I like the shape so far. IMG_5200

      • Rose
        Participant
        Chirps: 15

        @Janice And I can see improvement in the shape, nice!

    • Heather
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Proportions are the hardest - to make sure the bird is still identifiable as its species  - so many subtle cues are hard to capture. I find it difficult to get feathers right or at least not misleading. I am getting better at representing light/shade but still find it challenging to differentiate colour markings from shade markings.   There are are many things I see when I attempt to draw that I wouldn’t otherwise. It makes me realize that I don’t know bird feather structure very well! For me, if I sketch a plant in the field, I fully know its features. It’s such a great tool. C873F13E-1C9A-435E-8480-79F152E5665D
    • Erin
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      7DC6B28E-1180-4D19-888A-88F675E74B39 1. I have some experience in drawing from photos, so that helped give me some confidence. I tried to not get too caught up in the details, but since I’m new to birding, I realized that I’m not quite sure which details are important to capture precisely and which ones I can ‘fudge’ a bit. 2. However, drawing helps me notice the details in the first place, which will hopefully help me learn over time what makes each bird unique!
    • Joni
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      It wasn't too difficult but for me the challenge is usually getting the proportions correct. What was noticeable when drawing it was how the bill "connects" on the bird's head/face and the various colors on the bird's plumage-- it is not just yellow. This would indeed make a difference when journaling.IMG_3094
    • Kati
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      i like drawing from photos. it gives me much more time to study the detail, although i'm trying to stay loose. I find proportions the most challenging aspect, and i'm hoping this course will help fine tune my drawing skills. i would not have noticed the lichen at first. I think it's important to make note of those details in writing, as they do help complete the story of what you are seeing. IMG_8475
    • Sandy
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      IMG_2585
    • Montecito
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      1. I Liked drawing from a photograph, I could take my time to draw the details, the colors are more clear. I wish i could see the bird moving to analyze in a better way the beak, body, wings. 2.If I were sketching in nature, I would not notice details as the different colours, color of feathers. IMG_4492 (1)