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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      As educators, how can we be catalysts for students to observe and wonder? Provide your thoughts in the comment section below.
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    • kristin
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      kangello
      I teach physics.  It's not uncommon for me to run a demo and it doesn't go as planned.  After the class shares laughs at my expense, I will sometimes ask them why they think the demo went wrong.  I guess I like to model observation and wondering to my students. It doesn't take long for them to learn that I will always entertain their questions during class...whether it's about something physics related or just science related (and if I'm in the right mood, it can even be anything).    I'd say about once a week a student will ask a question that will result in me stopping class, having a discussion, and checking something on google. Maybe they get me off topic, but I just get so excited when I see evidence of students thinking and wondering about science I can't help but halt my plans to dive into a student-generated observation!
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      wbondi83
      My view is similar to Adam's where the environment that I set can have a large effect on whether students have the opportunity to observe and wonder. I have found that the best environments are ones that do not narrow the student's thinking into one specific pathway. If I stick to only my objectives, I have found that I am constantly steering students into the direction I want them to go. While this is necessary at times, it does not allow for much student wondering to occur. I also, need to be better at using open-ended questions and allowing every student opportunities to think about these and ask their own.
    • Adam
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      sweeney718
      The best way I have found to encourage students to observe and wonder is to make sure that they are in an environment where they can be exposed to interesting phenomenon.  Even if I have an agenda based on what my learning targets are, I can start the process by providing this phenomenon.  Once engaged, allowing my students to ask questions and focusing on those questions to lead our discussion.  Posing open ended questions as follow ups to those student observations is a great practice I want to improve upon in my own instruction.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christinelamont
      I was taken by the part in the I wonder reading, about putting you hand up when you know the answer, this is the opposite of what we're looking for we're looking for hands up when you wonder, observe and questions. This year in my teacher practice, I've been recording myself teach and looking at the questions I ask, I'm trying to get away from the closed , factual recall towards more of the open ended questions. I am definitely goingto make a wonder board and integrate it as part of all my classes, such a good way to honor student ideas and keep them for further investigation.
    • Aaron
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      asirtoli
      We must create opportunities for students to witness natural phenomena, and challenge students to make observations while having these experiences.  Observations, questions, and curiosity are encouraged through novel experiences.  We must create these experiences, encourage students to make observations, and ask good questions.  We can model questioning, and observation techniques.  When students ask good open ended questions, we help guide them into deeper understanding through data collection, additional observation, or experimentation.
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      AnnaEndreny
      I have found that trying to find interesting phenomena both at the beginning of the unit and at the lesson level, sparks student curiosity.   In addition I have students ask questions about the phenomena.  They brainstorm a list and put the top questions on post it notes that go on a driving question board.  I then look for patterns to the questions and pick those that will be the driving questions for the unit.  I post these driving questions and we refer back to them throughout the unit. I have done lessons from "the right question institute" where students label question as open or closed and then they try to make closed questions into open.  These lessons are important so that students see questions as a part of the scientific process. The most joy though seems to come from when students ask questions not when I have required it in a lesson but when it naturally arises.  The students are so fascinated by co-vid 19.  Unfortunately I slipped into answering some of their questions, but there are many questions that are unanswerable at this moment.
      • Aaron
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        asirtoli
        I love the idea of asking questions as they naturally arise.  For example, exploring the world of pathogens, virus vs. bacteria would be a great idea given the current circumstances in our world!  Also, I like the idea of helping students identify what questions are open ended vs. closed.
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