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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      Share your thoughts about participating in citizen science in the discussion below. Please address:
      • What citizen-science project did you do?
      • What challenges, if any, did you experience?
      • What learning outcomes might you expect from having your students participate in this project?
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Adam
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      sweeney718
      I participated in the GLOBE project.  I was drawn to the globe project because of the connections to the NASA satellites which are a part of my curriculum.  Signing up for the GLOBE project included downloading an app and there were 4 different types of Citizen Science projects to participate in.  I chose the NASA GLOBE Cloud Observation Project.  To do my observations I needed to observe the ground, precipitation, and cloud cover.  The main issue I ran into, and students may run into, was that the identification of clouds, their height, and forms was difficult.  There was a cloud ID wizard that helped, but I am concerned that my inability to perfectly ID the types of cloud I am looking at would lead to poor data.  I took additional time to make sure that I identified them correctly, but I am not sure every student would take as much time to do it correctly.  If I were to use this in my classroom, I would try to make cloud types a learning outcome for my class
    • kristin
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      kangello
      I participated in "Spiral Graph".  The goal of this project is to measure the winding of spiral arms in galaxies. This winding parameter has been linked to other parameters that are more time consuming and difficult to measure, such as the black hole mass in a galaxy’s nucleus. With citizen help, scientists can measure how tightly wrapped spiral arms are in galaxies and identify interesting candidates for future, detailed telescope observations. I had some challenges with this experience.  Some of the galaxies were really easy to delineate and draw in the spirals.  Others were really blurry and it wasn't clear what I was looking at. The learning outcomes I'd expect from having students participate in this project are the development of questions relating to galaxies.  Some of the ones that I anticipate students might have (and some are my questions, too!): "why are some galaxies smooth and others spiraled?" "do the spirals always go in the same directions?" "why do galaxies have certain colors?" "what is the bright spot in the middle of the galaxies?" I think that these questions could get students interested before we begin a unit on gravity and/or space science.
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      wbondi83
      Being home for so long has me further considering the link between weather (mainly lack of sunlight) and mood. Therefore, the Weather project is one project that I have interest in. While the one outlined in the "Investigating Evidence" refers to clouds and not necessarily sunlight, I still find it interesting and can relate it to the topic of sunlight vs. mood. For this, I would record the number and types of clouds I see daily here and then could later compare them to the satellite views as outlined in the project. The past few days has been dense cloud cover with rain most of the time. This has made it difficult to determine if there are any other types of clouds present. Also, looking at the clouds brings to the forefront the fact that, even though I studied weather at one point in my life, I have clearly forgotten a lot about it! For students though, I think this is important to realize; that you may not have the expertise or knowledge others have, but your observations and conclusion are important. I plan to track more information for this, including the duration of sunlight, intensity, and time spent outdoors vs the mood and energy level I have. I would like to extend this to my students as well so that we can collectively gather data and start to determine if sunlight truly does impact mood.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christinelamont
      I've been collecting data for e-bird everyday  everyday since schools closed. I had already been thinking that this would be a good fit with my students. The section about the open ended questions helped me calm my fears. I think I could ask open ended questions about birds we see, and the plethora of other observations we would make as we do a bird walk. Today I saw painted turtles sitting in the sun, red and grey squirrels chasing each other and Turkey Vultures passing over head west to east. All of these things made me wonder. I think the data collection will be fairly simple, and will really be secondary to all the observing, wondering and questioning  it will provoke.  
    • Aaron
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      asirtoli
      What citizen-science project did you do? Because school is no longer in session, I was unable to conduct a citizen science project with students.  However, I am going to encourage students to record data about when certain trees begin to grow leaves.  Our district is very hilly, with elevation differences ranging from 1100 feet to 2000 feet.  I'm going to encourage students to find out what elevation their home is, and record when trees around their houses start to grow leaves.  I'm going to have students determine if the differences in elevation around our school cause plants to grow leaves at different times.  This may not be a citizen science project, but shares many of the same principals.  Students will make observations, record data, and analyze data.  We don't know what we'll discover.  When we return from school, I'd like to participate in e-bird with students. What challenges, if any, did you experience? Currently, the greatest challenge for me is not being able to work individually with students due to school closures nation wide.  However, the internet has provided a means of communication that will enable a variety of educational endeavors, including the one I described above.  Certain aspects of science education have been difficult given the lack of face to face communication. However, learning about new ways to communicate with students and challenge students has been exciting! What learning outcomes might you expect from having your students participate in this project? I'd like to pursue the fish tracker citizen science project when we return to school.
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      AnnaEndreny
      I did the budburst project.  I thought reporting would be hard, but they made is easy by having choices to select and by uploading a picture. Although I see potential for my students to do this during this time that school is closed, I am challenged by how to sell this as a way that students are solving a local/global problem.  I know that they are contributing to data about the effects of climate change.  But, they want to solve the climate change problem.  Would this data be used to convince policy makers of the effects of climate change? Would the data be used to see if attempts to reduce climate change are working? I think there are several learning outcomes related to this project.  The first is observation, the second is learning about local plant species, next is to learn about plant life cycles.  Lastly, I think there is potential for downloading some of the data that is to free to us and look for patterns.
      • Aaron
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        asirtoli
        Good idea!  This is a great project to work on with students while we are not in session!
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      AnnaEndreny
      IMG_0470
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