• Doug
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      I tried doing something a little different on the  first photo.... American Robin in a stand of Hawthorn trees December 7th, 2020 ..photo is in the rule of thirds but not a typical bird photo as he is not facing the camera.  I wanted to see what would turn out with him facing away from me. I like the hues in the photo of the red Hawthorn berries in combination with the grey on his feathers and his layered feather structure all blurred as in classic bird photos....but as i said with a difference. The second photo of an Eastern Kingbird was taken somewhat as an afterthought.  I was leaving a marsh and I noticed him preening in close proximity to me. I figured oh what the heck, "Take one more shot." It has turned into one of my favourite shots .. I like the quality of the catch light (a term I now know from taking this course) up in the corner of his eye, photos is sharp, nice blurred background and it is a portrayal of bird behaviour showing as well great detail of his feathers. There is a sense of vunerability about him as well .. not sure if i am describing it correctly but i just feel something special about this photo.Robin Kingbird  
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Nice photo of the kingbird in action preening.
    • Dennis
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      I got lucky with this image. I had the opportunity for a quick shot of this pair of Cedar Waxwings, but noticed that if I stepped just a little to the left there was a deep shadow in the background, which is what I was looking for. I took the quick shot to make sure I had a photo then stepped to the left and recomposed for the better shot. Nikon D500. f/5.6. 1/800. ISO 2500. I chose to center subjects to achieve symmetry and illusion of mirror image. DSC_3490.NEF                                   i
      • john
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        Very nice image, Dennis.  What was the focal length ?  Really clean background; no noise. Did you crop the image ?
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Mirror look for these beautiful birds, nice idea.
    • john
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      SamplePortrait_001 This image is with a super-telephoto at max zoom, 1/500th, ISO 250, f6.3.  I find the sinuous neck pose quite visually compelling.  The original image is about 9000x6000, with crisp feather detail that is lost with this downsampled upload.
    • Taylor
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Has anyone used a Field Scope instead of a telescopic lens? It is supposed to attach to a camera and an I-phone using adapters.
    • Aidan
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      IMG_4015IMG_3987IMG_3954 I took all three of these photos at the leather stocking trail in NY and especially like the Golden crowned kinglet, because of how close I got to the bird, with only a 250mm zoom lens! The thrush is also one of my favorite because it is following the rule of thirds.
    • Kelly
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      DSC02441DSC03326DSC02387 For this assignment I really concentrated on using my manual settings while trying to get the "classic" bird photo using the rule of 3rds.  For the Song Sparrow I really liked how the branch in the foreground as well as the background were blurred while the bird itself was still in focus.  I spent a lot of time with this female Ruby-throated Hummingbird as she darted back and forth from the feeder to this tree and like how she's wrapped around the tiny branch.  I love how the Gray Catbird really stands out from the creamy green background.
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Hummingbird photo is great! Seeing them land and stay a second is fantastic to photo!
    • Matt
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      _DSC4305A wide open aperture and high speed created a nicely blurred background while the dew is still visible on the morning grass. Brewers blackbird
    • Matt
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      _DSC5121-2_DSC5119I took these Rufous Hummingbird photos with side lighting. I especially like the way that the fascia frame the bird.
    • Susan E.
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      E7720437-637D-452D-927C-4C0221E3C1EE9B99B90D-6B32-429F-8E4D-2F69F588C1C9AC4F5F72-D6A6-4E6E-9E2A-A0E7DE4CC379The top photo of a yellow-crowned heron (I think) is backlighting following the rule of thirds. The middle photo of the Tree Swallow is side lighting and follows through rule of thirds. Finally, Snowy Egret is front lighting.
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Melissa's photo on the side-lit Eastern Towhee:  Why did you shoot at F/7.1 instead of keeping it wide open and dropping down the ISO?  Wouldn't that have created a better quality image (less noise from higher ISO)?  I was just curious because I always try to shoot wide open unless I want to increase depth of field to capture multiple birds or for maybe a habitat shot.
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I spent a long time (45 minutes) trying to capture the spirit of this Black Phoebe - this is the only photo of many that follows the "rules".   I also was getting used to my Canon Powershoot HD50SX so there were some technical issues. But by using large aperture , I love the shallow depth of the field and how it highlights the bird. The Snow Egret violates the rule of thirds but it still isn't a bad picture!     black phoebe     IMG_3318
    • Marcia
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Used the Rule of Thirds in the first picture and in the last picture of the Canada Goose I broke the Rule of Thirds and the Goose is right in the middle of the picture. I really like both pictures, so I could go with using the Rule of Thirds but also breaking it when necessary. The middle picture of the Canada Goose is showing shallow depth of field when I was playing around with my aperture settings. Loved the assignment.0M8A1616a 0M8A1563a0M8A1606a
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Looks like the goose loved working with you, nice sharp photos and approaches to the shot.
    • Scott
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      While I lived in Florida for some time, I've never been able to capture decent images of Osprey...until one appeared in my backyard to munch on a tasty fish caught from our lake.  During the photo encounter a Bald Eagle and Hawk circled the Osprey watching for an opportunity to swoop down and steal the fish.  But the Osprey would not have it and spread its wings around the fish to hide it from any aerial attacks.  Both images are using the rule of thirds. 20200104-Backyard-Osprey-2-220200104-Backyard-Osprey-1-2
      • Isabelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 59
        Wow! That is such beautiful close ups. Amazing photos.
      • Scott
        Participant
        Chirps: 5

        @Isabelle Thanks so much Isabelle!  It was truly a magical encounter.

      • Robin
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        I am in awe of these photos!  Amazing.  I see osprey in my area, but they are always high up in the trees.  wow!
      • Christine
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        When I lived in Maine, I once saw an osprey dive and come up with a fish. Immediately an eagle was on it, trying to get it to drop the fish. Watched through binoculars for a few minutes until the eagle gave up. Apparently, they're pretty lazy.
      • Doug
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        Great shot, sharp, exposure , blurred background etc. great moment for you to have caught.
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Love the eyes in the first photo...intensity caught!
    • Betty
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Dickcissel with backlighting IMG_9365 Barn swallow with subject in focus and background blurred IMG_9325 Bald eagle side lighting IMG_8556
      • Laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        Great images and really cool to see the different types of lighting.
      • Justin
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        That Dickcissel photo is just gorgeous! Bravo!
    • Phyllis
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I live in the desert so there isn't much in the way of sit spots or car-blind birding.  I went to different locations for each photo.  For the common bee eater (bottom) I placed the nest hole in the upper right-hand 1/3 of the photo and photographed the bird as it exited.  There is a lot of space in front of the bird, to move into. The white spectacled bulbul (middle) was in my bird-bath and I broke the rules by putting it dead center, but I wanted to show motion.  I aimed low (belly-water interface) and got that in focus (F 5.7) and took a medium slow shutter speed of 1/125 of a second. Finally I broke the rules with the pale rock finch but was so happy that I got water drops on its face/throat.  I probably should have moved it to the left 1/3 of the photo and had more of the water in front of it, to the right. DSCN0075 P1080921DSCN0307
    • Julia
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      F909D717-D0CF-454E-8D63-D29B5F516921_1_105_c71E58947-257D-4843-A423-B7CB2008221C_1_105_c   I worked with the rule of thirds in both these images. The first, common yellowthroat,  and the second, sandhill crane photos were taken on an overcast day so the lighting was not as dramatic. I was more focused on exposure-light meter to prevent them from being too dark.
    • Lucy
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      I love how the painted bunting came out crisp but the leaves in the foreground and background are blurred almost creating a frame. This doesn't follow the rule of thirds bit the blurred edges draw the focus to the bird.DSC_3748e
      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39
        Such a beautiful image, Lucy. I love how the colour of the background accentuates the birds colours as well as that really effective blurring.
      • Fred
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        Excellent use of selective focus and aperture, Lucy! Beautiful color contrast as well.
      • Siddhesh
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        I really like this photo. It shows the colour features of the bird. It would have been better if there was no obstructing object. However, on the other hand, I think it also shows how well the bird tries to ambush itself.
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Really captured the colors beautifully!
    • Kent
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Well, these were shots that were done wrong. First the Chipping Sparrow had harsh noon sun overhead but it lit up his hair do. The Red-winged Blackbird had both the fore ground and back ground in focus, The House Finch was in the rain, no sun. I took the shot out of my sun room window. I still liked some aspect of each of these even though they don't go by the book.466152804499
      • Julia
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        I really like the house finch photo because you can see the bird is wet and the small streaks of rain.
      • Isabelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 59
        The house Finch is fabulous! I love the composition, the atmosphere, the rain and its expression! Bravo!
      • Siddhesh
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        Lovely photo! Loved the finch. Just a small note: would have been better if the limbs had not been cut :)
      • Robin
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        I really like all three photos.  They are all artfully done, even the shadows.  Sometimes I like to see some shadowing because it looks more natural, the way we see the bird in nature most of the time.  The house finch is especially lovely with the water droplets and perfectly focused.  I hope to take photos like this some day!
    • Plain ole house sparrow with side lighting. That really makes the feather texture pop.MKNC July 10 2020-6MKNC July 10 2020-11Sorry this isn't a bird-but I used spot metering on this mink's face like Melissa did on the crow to get his eyes, plus backlighting to highlight his fur. It's really hot here today and the birds just weren't out! I'm learning to change my metering mode to accommodate different situations.
      • gnu_photographer
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        Such a cool photo! The bird (sparrow sized?) looks as large as the mink! Perhaps because of the background compression from using your telephoto lens. An interesting effect. Thanks for sharing it! :)
    • helen
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      B32395D4-E0E5-4592-B489-ED02318654EBC2274BDA-E7F7-4D9D-97BF-F699A0E7C4BF8670485B-A73C-412B-B789-DE9A58BCB5B1The Dove is following the rules I think!  The Cattle Egret doesn’t but we wanted to include the Bull with it.  Not sure where the Killdeer fits in but liked the shot!
      • These are all nice. I would move the one with the bull over so that even more of the bull is showing and the birds is on the far left hand side-the look on the birds face is special as he's looking at the bull. :-)
      • helen
        Participant
        Chirps: 7

        @Elizabeth Agree Elizabeth!  Thanks for the comment!

      • Bill
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        The rule of thirds is a new concept to me.  It makes a lot of sense but I always centered the bird.  That is the one big thing I learned in this course and I really like how you positioned the dove in this photo.  I think it looks better than had you centered it.
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Sharp focus on that killdeer as they are usually running around...nice work!
    • ThStack Rock Trail July 8 2020-7
      • Don't know where my text went. Male Western Towhee, back lighting with shadow. This is a wrong use of composition-he needs more room to look into.
    • Carole
      Participant
      Chirps: 39
      Sometimes I'm just happy if I can get a photo of a bird that is all in the frame, exposed correctly and in focus! But I must say the lighting makes all the difference to the end result and really makes that bird 'shine'! Here are my offerings. Side lighting, rule of three and a slightly different rule of three just to make you smile. Hopefully! 😊22818EB4-93D3-4F22-BDC6-F303B3E87F008BF52595-34F9-4093-912D-00AB013DFC4093189A85-50B6-481D-9BFB-B0D196E9DBC2
      • Yes, that last use of thirds did make me smile. What is the bird in second photo? Nice shots.
      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39

        @Elizabeth Hi Elizabeth   The second image is a female superb fairy-wren. Here's a photo of the male. Found in the south and south east of Australia.   Cheers Carole5CD032A6-A397-4574-8065-66C61855ACF7

      • Julia
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        Really like the softness of the side light on the first as well as the beautiful bokeh. Great to see.
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Love the lighting on photo one with its softness. Yes, photo 3 did bring a smile, thanks!
    • Gary
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Photo is more interesting when using rule of 3rd's. The creamy background makes the main element stand out. I left the leaves on the right side to balance out the image.TT003001-Edit-1I took this photo at 1/1250, f/6.3 with ISO 500. I also touched it up a bit in Lightroom.
      • Isabelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 59
        Great photo!
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Glad you kept the heart-shaped leaf in the photo!
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      E0E74A30-5DC0-4FA5-A840-7B740FDE8B3B85208CD7-9BD6-45DA-8B4D-29A833447705A36D9501-D40D-41EA-B061-E0EB3427F2D9The picture of the American Oystercatcher, taken on my day trip pilgrimage to Cape May yesterday, follows the rule of thirds. The background is blurred in the Red-Tailed Hawk picture. For the Bald Eagle (taken on July 4th!), I broke the rule of thirds. The angle of the bird flying away, and the lack of anything but blue sky beyond it, made it look better to me this way. Fun fact, the Eagle and the Hawk (wasn’t that a John Denver song) were taken only 12 minutes apart, both using the car as a blind, sort of. The Eagle was too far away to care about me. I saw the hawk perched on a wire as I drove home from where I’d just seen the Eagle. The road was very lightly traveled at the time, so I was able to turn around, go back, stop underneath, and take the picture through the sunroof.
      • Mary
        Participant
        Chirps: 90
        Oystercatcher with food, very cool photo!
    • gnu_photographer
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Law_Dec2019-5 This is a photo in which I think I broke some of  the rules.  The photo of the Secretary Bird is taken with the negative space behind the bird rather than (the traditional) in front of the bird. I did this to emphasize the Secretary Bird's rearward facing plumes. Law_Dec2019-2 I think this Bee Eater photo is more in line with usual bird portrait rules, creamy background, rule of thirds. There is no catchlight in the eye but the iris is clear and evenly lit.
      • Gary
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        In the first photo, it looks like a wide aperture was indeed used producing a blurred background not exactly creamy. I would have placed the bird looking into the blank space, not away from it. The second photo has a nice creamy background, just what we want. Furthermore the bird is off-centered, using the rule of 3rd's and the photo is balanced with the branch on the left.
      • gnu_photographer
        Participant
        Chirps: 13

        @Gary Thanks for the feedback, Gary! :-)

      • What great birds-I'm loving seeing the birds from around the world. Your break the rules photo makes me want to scoot it over a bit so it is looking into the void-know you did this on purpose to emphasize the plumes. Second one has nice composition-thanks for sharing these birds with us.   Libby
      • gnu_photographer
        Participant
        Chirps: 13

        @Elizabeth Thanks Libby, for your feedback! :) Here's another birds of the world photo - a Kori Bustard. I have a few more on my instagram page if you are interested. It is the same name as my username. Kori Bustard Small Jpeg