Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: February 28, 2015
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 5

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Linda
    Participant
    I became a master gardener in 2017, and that's when I really became aware of the beauty and value of native plants. I have changed my gardening focus: I now garden for wildlife with beauty as an added bonus. I'm working on planting natives and eliminating more and more of my lawn. The biggest challenge I have is combating invasives, especially since I am in a suburban environment and a at least 1/2 of my 1.28 acres is left wild. I have lots of different birds at my feeders in winter, and in the shrubs and trees in summer. I want to plant more perennial natives to attract greater numbers of birds to the insects and seed they provide. I find it all overwhelming at times, and would like to establish goals and a way of implementing them to feel like I have more control over what I'm doing.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Our local Audubon chapter runs a trip to Springfield, MA every February where the crows roost in one of the hospital parking lots (they don't always choose the same one). They seem to like the lights that surround the lots. We go to a couple of the staging areas first, and then on to the roosting spot. The last time I went the estimate was 7000-10,000 birds. It was mind blowing! The trees surrounding the lot looked as though they had suddenly grown leaves, and the noise was deafening. The bright lights offer protection from predators, and perhaps warmth. There is also lots of trash to pick at in the urban environment. I love crows and the chance to see so many all at once was pure joy.
    in reply to: Roosts #983608
  • Linda
    Participant
    That the tags and bands in many cases lasted throughout the life of the crow and let the team know how long lived these birds are.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Wing patterns are particularly difficult for me to identify. I also still have trouble with crow tail vs. raven tail when the tails are spread open.
    in reply to: Crow Not Crow #918621
  • Linda
    Participant
    1. Squirrels and chipmunks take the majority of nestlings in the Northeast. Crows are near the bottom of the list of baby bird predators. 2. The best sighting of American Crows was with a Mass Audubon group on a cold night in February in a hospital parking lot in Springfield, MA. The crows were flying in from staging areas to roost at the edges of the parking lot where the lights gave them protection from owls. There were an estimated 7,000-10,000 crows, and I have never heard or seen anything like it! 3. There are both crows and ravens where I live in Western Massachusetts. The biggest difference I notice is the tendency for ravens to be more solitary. I rarely see them in large flocks like I do the crows. 4. Crows help to keep the insect and rodent population down, provide nests for great horned owls and merlins, are themselves prey for other animals, and help disperse seeds.
    in reply to: What is a Crow? #918454
Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)