Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: August 3, 2019
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 11

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    I think the use of rubrics is very appropriate for project based learning. Peer feedback would also assist with evaluation of the project. Constructive feedback could be used by the student to improve the project prior to final evaluation used for final grade. An aside on rubrics- The quality of the rubric influences the quality and helpfulness it has as an evaluation tool. I think the rubric format used as the Assessment Rubric for 4th Grade Reports was the best.  Criteria were clear. The scale was specific. The format of the rubric was easy to use.  The teacher project rubric was the most difficult to use. It lead me to use more subjective, rather than objective decisions about overall scoring.
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    The most challenging aspect I had with leading and assessing inquiry-based activities was- time. Content area units were taught in rotation with two other fourth grade classes. It was frustrating to be tightly bound by the clock. There were many times I longed to be back to the days of self-contained elementary school classrooms. If students were deeply engaged, I could monitor and adjust the time to allow extending science. It was also much easier to integrate units of study.
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    I selected Project Budburst. This background was provided on the website: "Budburst citizen scientists work together with research scientists, educators, and horticulturists  to answer specific, timely, and critical ecological research questions by making careful observations of the timing of plant life cycle events, also called phenophases. These life events differ depending upon the type of plant, but usually include leafing, flowering, and fruiting phases of plants as well as leaf color and senescence." (09/19/20; cut from: https://budburst.org/aboutus) the data base is available to anyone, including those who have not participated in the project. My students adopted a Bigleaf Maple tress located on the school grounds to observe for the school year. The question they sought to answer was:  How do trees respond to seasonal and climatic changes in their environment: temperature, length of day, and amount of moisture. Log books were kept to record observations.
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    In the context of a topic of study,  supply students with artifacts that are unfamiliar to them, but that you know relate to that topic somehow. Do this just after they have had a basic overview to the topic. Then put them in the shoes of a scientist in that field to role play and venture  guesses about the significance of the artifacts and to suggest ways to test those guesses.
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    I am participating in eBird. I wonder how will my entries  reveal trends or patterns in species sightings over time? With a new data collection tool on eBird, I am able to enter photos of birds I've taken in our wetland system from the past. The entries log in by the date the photos were taken. This may be a key in helping me to answer a question that has captured my curiosity over the time I have lived on a wetland.
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    Practicing and becoming an expert in automatically having the ability to ask open-ended questions is a trait all people who interact with children should possess. In my opinion, there is a crucial element to this goal that has been overlooked (at least in this point of the course). Asking the open-ended question is only half of the scenario in being catalysts for students to observe and wonder, the other half is to allow "wait time" or "think time." The power of silence, at least 10 seconds, when using wait time increases student thinking and the depth of their answers to questions. This link gives a helpful look at incorporating wait time in the classroom as a teacher shares his experiences and reflective thinking: Use Wait Time to Increase Student Thinking
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    I decided to do my sound map at night. We live on a wetland. Our RV is parked conveniently near the wetland edge. I lay on the bed with the windows open to avoid staying outside and hearing the sound of mosquitoes chewing on me! Sound Map
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    I was delighted to read about research that supports students, as citizen scientists, connecting their investigation data with an environmental agency. This an idea I strongly support. When learning is relevant, meaningful, and engaging students will feel successful and value their findings. Best of all- they gain ownership of their learning!
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    When I was still teaching, I used Project Budburst, and YardMap in my classroom. The students looked forward to the Big Leaf Maple tree near our building. Their observations and ensuing discussion built meaningful connections to the outdoors, seasonal changes, and appreciation of nature cycles. YardMap was a fantastic way to get to know, understand, observe nature in our own yards. I'm sad that this citizen science resource is no longer available. I personally have participated in the Great Backyard Bird Count. I think this project, the Christmas Bird Count, and Project Feeder Watch would be engaging to do with the neighbor children.
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    I am a retired teacher who is currently taking classes, like this one, that I hope will be useful in supporting children and their families in my neighborhood who have become at-home students due to the closure of schools in our district because of Covid-19. As I volunteer with these families, and learn the interests and needs of the elementary school-aged children (K, 3, 6 grades specifically),  I will have focus for inquiry science lessons based on the curiosity and questions children ask. With that said, I don’t have a specific inquiry lesson to analyze and modify. Because our homes all border a wetland, I will use our unique proximity to this ecosystem to create answers for the assignments in this class. ___________________________________ Topic for science inquiry: Animal coverings Confirmation Inquiry- Students confirm a principle through an activity when the results are known in advance. Students are provided with: question, procedure, solution. Question- I wonder if all the animals that live in our wetland have the same outer covering on their bodies? Procedure- Brainstorm a list of animals the child has seen in the wetland. Describe outer covering. and put into categories Solution- We can see that there are a lot of animals that live in the wetland. Not all animals have the same outer covering. General categories are: fur, feathers, scales, skin, etc. Structured Inquiry- Students investigate a teacher-presented question using student designed/selected procedures. Students are provided with: question, procedure Question/ procedure- categorizing. We discovered animals in the wetland have outer coverings. How can we organize these coverings into categories? Students decide how to group the animals on the list they generated in the first activity. Guided Inquiry- Students investigate a teacher-presented question using student designed/selected procedures. Students are provided with: question Question/ children decide how to answer the question. We found a way to group the animals by their outer coverings. Why does each group have that particular type of covering? Open Inquiry- Students investigate question that are student formulated through student designed/selected procedures.
  • Jane
    Participant
    Banjojanie
    The following quote from the article resonated with me: "Inquiry is the science, art and spirit of imagination." Inquiry allows us, as human-beings and learners, to remain curious and to wonder about our interactions with the world around us. It provides a pathway for critical, logical, and creative thinking as we set about describing something that captured attention... about something we wish to investigate, to understand, to solve... Inquiry, practiced life-long, is an antidote for: boredom, stagnation, prejudice, despair, and feeling disconnected from life. This is my concept map to represent elements found in my thinking about Inquiry pre and post reading the assigned article. Inquiry_pre-reading inquiry_post reading
    in reply to: Intro to Inquiry #731978
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)