Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: September 10, 2018
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 60

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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 60 total)
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I installed a large branch, cut in half, and dug it into the ground. I actually saw a woodpecker beak-drilling into it.   It was cool, because it is near my backdoor, and my original intent was to attract a woodpecker. It was a Downy Woodpecker. I also attract a lot of squirrels, and I saw a White Squirrel,  in the bird feeder/bath. 100_1680 I have read, that is is tough to have a bird feeder-yard-system, and not get squirrels. But it is good, I think, that the critters get healthy  food, and then when Raptors hunt them, they get a critter, that has had good food, and not Rodenticide affected food. I have seen some Raptors near me, but never in my yard. I have seen DOVES, WOODPECKERS, SPARROWS, BLUE JAYS, and once, a group of AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES. And a GRAY - TUFTED TITMOUSE.   Thx., bjorn k.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I saw, on an Ebird photo, and orange slid over a branch. Like in this photo. And I learned, from this course, that water is more important than seeds, relatively. I installed 2 water baths, and 1-2-3, seed feeders. I saw, 6 American Goldfinches, all together, last week. And a male and female Cardinal, together, almost 5 times in the past week. This method, is more educated, than, say, putting a huge amount of seeds, and little/no water.IMG_1135IMG_1138 thx. bjorn k.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    My question is, why are some birds so scared of humans. And some not. A Canada Goose, a Crow, a Seagull, all will eat food, practically out of your hand. In the wild. Other birds, would take a trainer, and/or a low % of that certain breed, would not fly away. I have always seen GREAT BLUE HERONS, and Raptors, or Eastern Bluebirds, be of the 'flighty,' type. But a Canada Goose, Duck, or a Sparrow, be much less scared of humans. Especially if we have food, for them. The obvious answer is the partial domestication of that bird. But some birds fly away, immediately, at the sight of a person, walking in their territory. Yet some birds, stay put, until you are about a few inches from them. Certain percentages exist, of course, of exceptions, of each hypothesis. Not all bird are always scared, and most flinch a little. But some will stay right near you,and some will fly away from fear, at the mere sound of a footstep. Why ?
  • BJORN
    Participant
    RESEARCH - OBSERVATION - EXPLORATION - DISSECTION - CRITICAL THINKING   I would say that the exploring, and finding, of the needed specimens are important, because you need the actual 'thing.' Be it a Lady-Bug or a water vial. Also, the science through observation and the dissection or inspection of the 'thing,' and its' scientific analysis. I am also curious how to analyze a non-scientific trait of birds. Do birds pose for a camera ? I have seen birds fly up to me, and stop, and then fake me out, and leave as I press the button. Or actually stay until I am done with a few takes. How can a person answer that question ? I would like to run a group on which types of birds can handle food produced from humans, and which cannot. Seagulls and Crows eat rubbish. But I never see a RWBB, nor a Swan, eat rubbish. But Canada Geese do. What is the affect, and why ?
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I was a relief worker in social work, before COVID hit, and then was hired as a Stray Cat Feeder, in the interim. If I go back to social work, I would like to lead groups, or 1 on 1, in wilderness therapy. And one concept, is the INQUIRY CONCEPT, in regards to comfort and amazement, and how it relates to experience in the field. The first time you see a Red Winged Blackbird, or get a pic. of a Great Blue Heron, and then the 5th time. Does your knowledge increase ? Do you get excited with multiple taken pictures, multiple times ?   I, 2 years ago, I never had a RWBB, nor a GBH, photo. Now I have many. And it is exciting, and therapeutic. Also, validating, as you go on a walk, and then see the birds you are seeking. So the INQUIRY CONCEPT, and learning thru citizen science in the field, is a great cycle. Therapeutic, teaching, and real.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I used to be a Counselor for a SOCIAL SERVICES PROGRAM. And we ran open mic's. Of poetry and music. It was amazing at the level of skill that was present, depending on the preparation of the student. And the Self awareness of the student, and the preparation, as it affected their comfort. Sort of a 'self inquiry.' If the student practiced, and was at least of basic talent, they were comfortable. If the student was great, but not ready, through practice. They felt uncomfortable. If a student tried to be too good, and was not rehearsed, they felt awkward. So the sort of 'self inquiry,' was different, depending on those circumstances.   So, you can see this sort of solution, that occurred, depending on the preparation. Like the Science experiments. The minute there is an understanding, there is learning. And then the previous example/situation, is "solved," or "understood."   Then, the inquiry, creates learning. But in music/poetry, you want to learn first, in rehearsals, so there is no "un-chartered territory," in the presentation. In a learning situation, there is an 'a-ha,' and a possible conclusion, through INQUIRY.  
  • BJORN
    Participant
    IMG_20210327_165404~2 One of the simple ways I used INQUIRY, was my introduction the Red Winged Blackbird. Before the 'LAB,' courses, I never really knew about them. Then on one of my first nature walks, I saw 2. Then I thought, it must be a rare bird. Then I read that they are one of the, " most abundant birds in North America. " Then I went to a place where I can see dozens of them, every time I go there. Now I know, they are an abundant bird, but they love nature settings, only. So they are not like a 'backyard bird.' Nor a rare, California Condor, in there commonality. They are and abundant bird, but are usually in a natural environment. Not in a backyard, nor a parking lot ? Now I can photo them, and am comfortable with them, and now, through inquiry, I understand. At least in my zip code ?
    in reply to: Intro to Inquiry #803392
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I would say, that the knowledge of looking for a 'white-wash,' is helpful, when looking for Owl homes, in trees.   That is the best way to tell if there is a large, raptor style bird, in the area. Especially Owls. Gross, but helpful.   Also, the different Owl sounds we learned, are helpful. I knew the basic, 'hoot hoot.' But now, I can practice about 3-5 sounds, from the list.   Lastly, the Owl classifications and populations are good to know, especially the spooky, ethereal, Sri Lanka Owl, Boobook, and Congo Bay Owl. It is not easy to learn about jungle, foreign Owls. Now I know.  
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I always thought, Dove sounds were Owls. The 'coo coo,' sounds like 'hoot hoot.' So I would think there were dozens of Owls in the forest. Now, after these courses, I can tell, that an Owl is not as prevalent, and sound more like -' hoo hoo hoo hohoho hoo.' Also, I never knew a Barn Owl sounded so Catlike. I would think, to hear that in a night time forest, it was a Panther. Scary. The Great Horned Owl sound makes sense to me, and so does the Screech Owl, because they are unique. But the Screech Owl almost sounds like a robot. So spaced and 'cartoon like.'  All the Hooter Owl sounds ring a bell, and sound like classical Owl sounds, but just a little different, than the classic, 'hoot hoot.' I like to hear the ones that mixes a trill and a hoot. Owly and unique.
    in reply to: Is It An Owl? #775958
  • BJORN
    Participant
    The Owl Family, seems to be more private, and almost scared/paranoid, of beholders. One thing I want to do, is get a picture of a raptor, that seems easier to photo, than Owls and Hawks/Eagles. A Vulture cleaning a carcass. I do not think I will ever see an Owl, that will stay still. I have seen them perch, and fly away. And like an Eagle, or Hawk, they do not seem to like being in the eye of a beholder.   What is it about some birds, that they do not get scared away. I have seen Swans, right next to me, and other Swans have eaten,out of a persons hand, even in the wild. An Owl is scared, like a smaller bird. And they are never near people. Even skittish small birds, eat near people, and will eat out of a persons' hand, if food is presented. Why is such a strong bird, so skittish ?   And just in general, what makes a bird scared, or not, of people ? Why can a Swan, be within a  few feet of you ? And a Goose too. And other birds be completely scared ? Owls also seem to have more personality to them. The pics I have seen, almost show human moods to them. Not blank, nor plain. Like they are wearing a fear, and a care, on their sleeve. Not a plain bird.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I saw, in one of the lessons, that a Great Horned Owl, can hunt, up to the size of a Cat. I would love to see a picture of a larger Owl species, in a fight with a Cat. Or even a Grouse. It seems the Owls, usually go after smaller vertebrates. But if there is a picture of a larger Owl, hunting a medium/small vertebrate, it must be awesome. OWL vs. CAT, or OWL vs. GROUSE.   It would have to be a larger/largest Owl. Great Horned Owl / Fish-Eagle-Hawk Owl.          ??   I did not know there was a Fish Owl, or a Hawk Owl, or an Eagle Owl. Kinda like the Osprey, to Eagles and Hawks. Same family, but a little different.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    One thing I would like to do, is take a trip to, Cape Cod. For birding, only. I usually go to the Gloucester Ma., area. But, I think that some Cape Cod areas, may be better birding hot spots. For different birds. Are there more Heron/Crane variations ? I know the North Shore is great, but I need a different landscape.   I would like to research, more, where to find birding hot spots, and go there just for that reason. Birding. Birding only. More 'rarity,' or 'unique,' sightings, and more detective work, as to, where to go. OWLS/OSPREYS/EAGLES/VULTURES/PUFFINS, are on my list. -b.k.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    One thing I have noticed, is that in the past year, I have seen many more Cardinals. And Blue Jays. I do not know if it is because I noticed them more, or due to bird feeders. But sometimes they are everywhere.  I am not sure about Eagles, but according to the Cornell stats, they are on the up and up. More of them. I wish I would see more of them. Because I only see them on occasion. Without much of a photo. opp. I have seen Vultures circling, but never in proximity. My next goal is to get a photo of a Vulture cleaning a carcass. And another Raptor, close up. Here is my only Raptor pic. A ?Black Vulture?SOLO RAPT.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I am contributing to eBird, regularly. And I am going to pant some Native Plants, in the spring. I have some birdfeeders, and a birdbath. I do not use pesticides on my lawn. And I will make my lawn more, 'bird friendly,' this spring. I want to make some custom adjustments to my property, to be more bird friendly. Mainly, more longer grass, and wildflowers. And at least some potted native plants, if not some planted ones. I get a lot of birds each year. I want to improve in 2021. More birdfeeders in sheltered places. Not just in the middle of the lawn. On branches, on the edge of my property. To feed birds while they are in a sheltered place. Not only out in the open. -b.k.
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I like birds, for their artistic, and universal and historical appeal. All nations, and states, have birds as symbols.  A lot of artists, and musicians, have bird motifs. Free Bird, Golden Bird, Fly like an Eagle. Birds are a universal inspiration, and have a lot of meaning and diversity.   Also, is there and animal, that exists on the fringe, better than a bird. They are everywhere, and they rarely attack people, and interact with society, as a population. Insects attack, and are annoying. Coyotes cannot be trusted, and other animals have to hide. But birds are on the fringe, and are can be hidden, and are also everywhere. Without much drama. I learned from this course, that Birds, are important for insect, and rodent control. And for spreading seeds, of trees, to help forestation.  I also have become a better birding artist, because I know where to go, and what bird to photo. Next up, is the Red Winged Blackbird. To photograph in a meadow.  
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I looked it DSCF0243up, on the ABA. The American Birding Association. They have rare bird alerts, throughout the USA. For 12-18-20, they have a bird, I have never heard of. Photographed on 12-16-20, it is TUNDRA BEAN GOOSE. From PENN. USA. There was a list, in MA., and one on the list, was a form of Grosbeak. A Cackling Grosbeak. That was listed, recently. I, myself, have seen more of the classical, common birds, that you would see. But I have seen some unique Geese, at a farm, on the North-Shore. I have never seen a bird, that was so rare, as to report it. If I do, I now where to report it. The ABA, and eBird. (this pic., is a Goose, that was on a farm. in Northern Ma.)
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I went to a Wildlife refuge, and saw a couple of Great Blue Herons. I was able to see one of them was a darker blue, and one was a lighter blue. I was not sure if it was a different species, other than a Heron. But I looked up on the computer, and google searched, Wikipedia. And saw that there is a few 'forms,' of Heron. I guess there is a 'white,' form. A 'blue,' form. And other forms, that make the Herons, different. But the same species. I have had a tough time, by eye, telling the difference, between Say;Heron D.sip Snowy Egrets, and a White Heron, and a White Ibis. But with a field guide, and visual inspection, I can tell them apart.   I now know, what type of beak, to look for. And shape, size, etc.... Although, the Black Crowned Night Heron, threw me off, until I was corrected by a moderator. thx.-b.k.   This, I believe, is a Snowy Egret. I may have mistaken it for a White Heron, but it is clearly not a White Ibis. ?? I dunno ??
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I have only seen, a Barn Owl, fly by me, once. On the end of my street. It went onto a branch, and perched, then flew away. I started bird photography, chasing Water-Birds. But now, I want to take more pictures of Owls, and Raptors. They are very hard to find. And harder to photograph. I am jealous of people,  who live in true wilderness. Because in those areas, Owls are more common. And adventure into plain sight. I am in a suburb, but not a 'mountain city,' nor a true 'forest city.' I have had good luck photographing Swans, and Great Blue Herons', and the usual suspects. But no close ups of any Raptors, nor Owls. I will keep trying. I am sure this course will help. -b.k. I like the Screech Owl, because it has a'raw,' and 'natural,' call. -b.k.
    in reply to: Who Is That Owl? #761084
  • BJORN
    Participant
    I would guess, the first place, ROGER ROAD, is near, or on some water. There are many more ducks, and forms of ducks, listed on the list. There must be some shrubs, and bushes. Because there are a lot of birds that need cover, and are perching birds , or tree foragers.   MT. LEMMON, seems to have no waterfowl. And a lot of raptors, or birds that are not 'home dependent' on a watery home. The birds listed are perchers ? Or tree foragers, and must be birds that are not living in, or on, or near water. No, or little waterfowl listed. My guess.???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????IMG_0380IMG_0346
  • BJORN
    Participant
    ACTIVITY 1 - There is a cemetery, that always has the same group of birds. Blue Jays, Geese, Robins, and Swans. It is located in an urban area, in WALTHAM MA. It has the same exact birds, the 2-3 times I have  been there. The river, has Swans. Swimming by. The bushes, have birds, that live in the berried trees, by the river. And there are always Blue Jays, and Geese, in the cemetery as well.   In Concord Ma., there is a wildlife reservation, with a lot of more wild, less urban birds. Ospreys, Blue Heron, Red-Winged BlackBirds, and even non-birds, muskrats, and turtles. There seems, to be, an appreciation of nature, here. There is less man made landscapes, IN this area. And it is more inviting to wilder birds. I have seen Swans here, and Geese. But no Blue Herons' in Waltham.IMG_0349
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 60 total)