Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: November 4, 2019
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 29

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 29 total)
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    I think it's great that you have them carry their journals and record observations and questions whenever they are motivated to do so. It inspired them to see inquiry as more than a 'school' thing, and can set them up for life-long learning.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    Answering a question with a question is a great technique. I know that I was very shy through high school, and did not have a whole lot of confidence. I think more adults sincerely asking my opinion in this way, and conversing as more of an equal with me, would have helped develop that confidence more readily. Keep up the wonderful work!
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    It is heartening to hear of your school allowing so much unguided discovery! Convincing schools to include any kind of outdoor time other than that spent on playground equipment into the school day is often a challenge here.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    While leading hikes, I regularly incorporate at least one sensory awareness activity at some point during our outing, no matter the ages of the people with me. This may be a listening exercise or a 'count how many colors you can see from where you are standing/sitting'. Discussion about everyone's observations often lead to participants being curious about what they have seen or heard, and to many questions being asked. I often refer people to reference sources that might help them answer closed questions, and prompt them to think about how they might investigate open-ended questions. At times I pose open-ended questions myself. There are participants who have attended subsequent outings and related how they went about finding out answers as well - always a treat.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    Our land trust runs a feeder watch program similar to Project Feeder Watch, but in an abbreviated time frame in the spring, and then we encourage participants to sign up for Feeder Watch the following fall. I have been responsible for the program just these two past years, with drastically different outcomes. In 2018 we concentrated mainly on school classrooms and homeschool groups in a limited portion of our region due to staff resources. In 2019, we started with the same audience, but throughout the region, then pivoted to doing things online with anyone who wanted to participate. Based on both experiences, I am looking forward to developing a set of year-round activities that encourage people to continue learning beyond feeder watching, and that involve using eBird and other online citizen science apps. I have used eBird myself to begin documenting observation on our wildlife sanctuary property. I have a lot of learning and practice to do, but intend on incorporating it into more of our programs in general, as well as offering more specific programs focusing on the many apps available. Combining non-screen experiences such as nature journaling and citizen science apps as well help everyone to better connect with nature and the environment - all ages, all abilities, all backgrounds. Non-screen approaches allow those without equipment such as a smart phone or iPad to feel that they can also contribute to the process.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63

    @Mark I coordinate a similar spring feeder watch program for my land trust employer, and find that it's a fabulous activity for all types of people. This year we had to pivot to online resources (rather than in-person support) and had more participation than ever before, due to so many people home and looking for interesting things to do! We had kids as young as 3 and adults in their 80s watching birds and learning so much. I am working to develop a full-year of curriculum resources for all ages in order to get more people engaged in conservation.

  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63

    @Mark Thanks for sharing your experience with the sunflower project.  We grow sunflowers in our backyard and am looking forward to taking part this year.

  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    Many of my outdoor programs are recreation oriented - hiking, kayaking, bicycling, etc. I would like to more intentionally incorporate inquiry in these programs, as well as design natural and cultural history programs that more readily incorporate open-ended questions. Presently they are not, and I often end up being a type of tour guide relaying factual information rather than helping participants explore their own curiosity. I will be more conscious going forward to ask for 'I wonder' questions before we head out anywhere, and ask questions rather than offer answers as we move along.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    Thank you so much for elaborating on the tools and concerns for students who experience the world differently! We are currently trying to make sure we are including all types of participants in our programs, so these are very helpful for me to learn about.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    I recently read an article about scientists collecting general recordings of different world habitats using AI technology so as to evaluate healthy and impaired systems. I love that you get your students thinking this way about the diversity of sound as an observation technique regarding the whole ecosystem!
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    I love the extension of having two people back to back communicating! Planning to add as a sensory activity for my walks.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    sound map I am continually impressed by the variety of sounds in my backyard at any given time. This time I did not hear the high pitched cack-cack-cack of the neighborhood sharp-shinned hawk, but much more variety of mechanical sounds than usually heard within 10 minutes. Mowers, traffic and helicopters, oh my! I heard bird activity primarily close by due to the tree cover and my neighbor's well-stocked bird feeders :D. Always a cardinal and house wren singing. The dogs barked before the sudden siren, which I found interesting. The combination of all of these sounds together, including my husband's voice on the phone through the open window of our house and the sound of the breeze through the trees just felt like a very rounded representation of home to me.  I have used sound mapping exercises a lot during outings with families or groups. It helps calm everyone down to focus on the world outside themselves and all around them. I often will stop and do a one-minute 'sounds around' inventory at different points on a walk, in different types of habitats, so we can discuss the similarities and differences between stops.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    How wonderful to have real, live resources who provide such great experiences for your students! I love the idea of the thank you book. I could see doing a reciprocal one if I were the person that met the students, as well.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    It's hard to keep adults engaged with the kids, it's true. I, too, would like to make our field trips more meaningful scientifically. I have more regularly been in the role of the trail guide/scientist - it would be great to have 'I Wonder' questions from a group I am taking on a hike in advance! I could then ask the adults for their questions to add to the list, maybe getting them engaged as well. Cancellation of field trips has been very difficult, as so much of what we are trying to do is to immerse everyone outdoors. Virtual field trips aren't nearly as sensorial. However, you might arrange for  one or more live sessions with a naturalist/expert with your students, or have them record a video addressing the students' questions.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    I plan on incorporating more "I Wonder" board activities into the beginning of my outdoor programs with families. Instead of telling them what I think we might see on a walk, I'll ask them what they think they might see, document what we do see, and compare it to the initial list. I will also try to document their questions along the way, then review which ones we answered through observation, and consider which ones we didn't answer and how we might go about finding those answers.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    I love that STR programs contribute so much to the larger understanding of the river ecosystem and beyond, Alaina. I feel like we (Tug Hill Tomorrow) struggle with this mostly because the organization is really in its infancy as far as school programs. But we do really well with attending to the unexpected. We should get together and exchange ideas!
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    Me, too, Allison! I am usually so excited about the topic that it's hard for me to not just take the lead, but we can do it!
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    I relate most to attending the unexpected in my work as an informal outdoor educator. Although I will offer a program focused on a particular topic for youth and families outside, the multitude of environmental stimuli outdoors usually leads to all sorts of questions, discoveries and investigations. I find that I will connect with different learners over different interests, and I love experiencing and bonding with others' enthusiasm about something we encounter on the trail. We stop and investigate things together as co-learners, and it becomes a joyous, inspiring memory with learning applications that extend beyond the particular outing.  I find that I do need to improve my question-framing so as to better position participants as scientists rather than being the source of knowledge, and that I need to make sure and discuss potential actions they can take in their communities more explicitly with my groups.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    I work informally with groups, too, Allison. I have not incorporated iNaturalist or eBird into our programs yet, but look forward to doing so as we go forward and can do more in-person programming again. It is challenging because not everyone has the resources, as you say, but your tips are very much appreciated. The idea of citizen science hikes for families is exciting! I may have to steal that idea ;D.
  • Linda
    Participant
    Lingibbs63
    Wow I wish you'd been my middle school teacher, LOL! I was fortunate to be able to travel to Ecuador the final semester of my master's program, and I learned so very much. Using nature journaling to get your students outside was a stroke of genius. I am sure they needed that time to get out of the house with their own thoughts and just be, while being able to focus on a world other than themselves and all the stresses they were experiencing. I highly recommend feeder watching and Project Feederwatch. We do a spring feeder observation program, which is exciting for participants because of all the new birds migrating through, but PF's longer winter period allows students to become familiar with resident birds and explore more questions more fully. I love that your enthusiasm has led to the same for your students! Sometimes seeing their instructor passionate and learning allows deeper connection - they see that you are human!
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 29 total)