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Active Since: May 21, 2020
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Replies Created: 3

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  • Cara
    Participant
    Today I visited Sydney Olympic Park where there is a great wetland reserve. I saw a Great Egret, White-faced Heron, and many Black-winged Stilts (which I adore), Black Swans, Fairy Wrens, Swallows, Black-fronted Dotterels, Silver Gulls, Royal Spoonbills, and Chestnut Teal ducks. The water on the reserve is shallow and marshy is many areas, and these were the places the Stilts and herons hung out. The ducks and swans were on islands and banks in the deeper areas. The Fairy Wrens were catching bugs in the shrubby area at the edge, and the swallows just swooped over the whole area, catching lunch. Notably absent were the Red-necked Avocets I saw in the warmer months amongst the Stilts. They must have migrated north for the winter. The pelicans that are usually in the area were also absent, and whilst I did see a few cormorants, they were not present is as many numbers. Hope you norther hemisphere birders are enjoying the abundance of birds in your areas!
  • Cara
    Participant
    Hi everyone. For activity 4 I have chosen a male golden whistler. He is a small bird. Short body and medium length tail. Small beak which curves slightly downwards to a point. Mostly yellow, but with black head and nape, and olive green wings. It has a white throat or bib, and black chest band. Legs, beak, and eyes are black. Seen in Australian bushland perched on a horizontal gum tree branch, singing his distinctive and loud song.
  • Cara
    Participant
    IMG_20200509_191828_494 I was so happy to be able to sit an watch these two Scarlet Honeyeaters on a bushwalk not far from my home during one of my iso-walks! They are Australia's smallest honeyeaters apparently, and they were indeed tiny. They didn't mind that I was sitting about a metre and a half away from them as they licked nectar from bottlebrush flowers. So very very pretty.
Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)