Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: June 18, 2019
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 5

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Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Michele
    Participant
    MGarlick
    I was surprised to learn that there is a crow hunting season in California where I live.  Much of this seems to rest on the idea that crows destroy crops and kill waterfowl - negatively impacting farmers and hunters and carry West Nile virus.  Curious to know the counter-arguments and statistics to these statements. https://www.wonews.com/t-CAGunsHunt_HuntingCrows_013119.aspx Guess I was surprised because on one hand they are protected by the Migratory Bird Treaty Act 1918. Michele
    in reply to: What is a Crow? #653679
  • Michele
    Participant
    MGarlick
    I have not seen large roosts here in Northern CA (SF Bay Area).  I'm wondering how I might go about discovering where these are in my area.  Any tips?
    in reply to: Roosts #636116
  • Michele
    Participant
    MGarlick
    Most interesting --  the wing tags for distance identification!  So curious as to how these were developed, made, coded, attached.  Would love to learn more.
  • Michele
    Participant
    MGarlick

    @Mary So interesting Mary!  I just recently became intrigued by crows.  A few times last year I saw five or six sitting on a small retaining wall in my backyard.  So this April, I decided I would see if I could get more visits if I put some shelled and unsalted peanuts on that wall...and I have.  :-) I'm only ever visited by 2 at a time, although I hear and see many more in the neighborhood trees around here.  At dusk I often see many crows flying off overhead in the same direction -- I assume for the evening roost. And I wish I knew where that was. What I wonder about is territory...?  And why am I visited by only 2 at a time? Also not sure the 2 I see now are the same 2 I started with.  Those original two individuals I could visually distinguish (I think!) by relative size, their behavior, and one bird had a feather defect (notch missing) in the right wing. I used to call this pair Trigger (bigger bolder bird) and Bullet (smaller more cautious bird).  Named, because if I pulled Trigger enough times, Bullet would eventually follow.

    in reply to: What is a Crow? #636078
  • Michele
    Participant
    MGarlick

    @Mary I live in the San Francisco Bay Area and I have a pair of crows that frequent my yard that I feed daily.  What I have noticed with them and the squirrels... if I set up a novel feeding station, the crows are wary and the squirrels or a Steller Jay will partake of the food while the crows watch.  However, once the crows became comfortable, they would scare/chase the squirrels away -- including swooping down on them from a tree.  At least here, it seemed plausible to me they were watching and using the squirrels to assess safety.  I caught some of this on video.

    in reply to: What is a Crow? #636062
Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)