Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: December 25, 2019
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 17

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla

    @Lee Ann van Leer Hi Lee Ann - the articles seems to suggest though that the insecticide theory was disproved??

    in reply to: Creative Crows #661934
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    I chose just to sit at the window in my den, which looks out onto my back yard. It is only -5°C here today - which is very warm; last week it was in the -20 to 25°C range most days. It is also completely overcast, and there is virtually no wind. I had low hopes for what I would be able to observe.  I had seen a red squirrel earlier in the day, as well as the rabbit that lives under our deck; but, no wildlife at all for the 1/2 h or so that I sat at the window. This dearth of activity forced me to really look. I observed two interesting things: 1) the dead crab apples that are still hanging on my tree are relatively evenly distributed; although, perhaps less densely on the north side of the tree. Possibly because the wind in this area blows predominantly from the NW most times of the year?? Contrarily, the few remaining bunches of seeds still hanging on my Manitoba Maple are only located on the north side of the tree. I couldn't think of an explanation for this one, except that I think the seeds have predominantly been stripped off the tree by said local red squirrel. Perhaps she left more on the north side because it is windier and makes foraging on those branches more precarious?? No clue. Interesting to try to reason through it though!
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    Agreed. The salt grinder is terrific - you can tell light was shining on it from different directions.
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    Juan - I think you did an admiral job on those challenging feathers; but I think you really caught the head. The angle, the light. Nicely done.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #655733
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    Kim - terrific first sketch ever! I like the way you caught those bottom feathers along the bird's belly, and the feet grasping the branch.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #655732
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    Karen, what a terrific idea to take this course with your son. Please tell him I enjoyed his drawing and think he did a great job of perching the warbler on the branch!
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #655731
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    Kathryn, I think you did a terrific job of capturing the different layers/textures of the feathers/wings.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #655728
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    That is lovely Ida. I really enjoy the way you made the watercolours give the illusion of different textures.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #655726
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    I can't believe you have never drawn. That is an amazing likeness! Good job! I admit I am slightly envious ;)
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #655724
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    warbler rendition I really enjoyed drawing from  the photo. I didn't feel rushed and could keep going back and pulling in details I had missed previously. The most difficult for me was details like the moss. I find I lose patience trying to render it. And the leaves. Even the feathers actually, I kind of tried to make the impression of several layers of feathers, including the wings, but I lose patience getting it 'just so'. I liked that I could go back and correct the head and beak angle, but I still think it is slightly 'off'.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #655722
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    Melissa, great point about the photo allowing you to perceive the 2D perspective. I hadn't pegged that thought, but now that I read it, you are absolutely correct. That really is the clincher. I mean I agree with everyone else's comments about having the time to really look at shape and colours because it is 'still', but in trying to render it, the fact that this is already 2D is a huge advantage. I guess now the challenge will be to try to see it that way in the field! Thank you for sharing that observation.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #655721
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla

    @Lee Ann van Leer Great question Kendra. Very interesting that so little is known about the courtship ritual. This is usually such a big part of what you read about whenever trying to learn about different birds from your standard guidebooks. Now I'm really curious why crows are so different (i.e., if it is in fact a short courtship period, then why? Does it make them vulnerable somehow?)

  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    Agreed. I noticed they are never really all that cute ;) They kind of go from breath-takingly ugly to almost full feathered like an adult. THe blue eyes when they are young is also helpful.
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    That's interesting Matt. I live in Winnipeg - which has a very similar climate to Edmonton - and the crows do not leave here in the winter. I have only ever seen a raven inside the city once (that I know of - quite possibly I wasn't able to distinguish before this course) - and it was yesterday (in the winter). I always thought we didn't see ravens in the city because they prefer woodsy areas, but maybe it is also because the crows don't leave. I will watch the exhaust fans at the local 7-11 over the course of this winter though...maybe the ravens are congregating there after all!
    in reply to: What is a Crow? #655172
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    That's interesting Lita that the crows regularly use the water to soak their food. I have a bird bath in my back yard, and a little drainage pond in my front yard, and both are heavily used (for drinking and bathing) by all the birds, squirrels, and even cats in the area. I have seen crows very  occasionally drink from the pond, but I've never seen them bring food to it. I wonder if there is something more enticing about your saucer than my bird bath or pond. Maybe they like that your saucer is more shallow? Hmm...I will have to experiment next summer!
    in reply to: What is a Crow? #655170
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    That is so interesting (to me) that you associate ravens with higher elevations Sally. I live in the Canadian prairies (above N Dakota) so elevation is not a topic around here. Even though they do exist in my area, I mostly have always associated them with 'the North'. I am ashamed to admit that I actually didn't realise they lived in the western States until I saw the map. As far as different behaviours - my main distinction on that is that crows are gregarious and live in groups, whereas I believe ravens tend to be solitary.
    in reply to: What is a Crow? #655169
  • Eveline
    Participant
    WonTolla
    That is an awesome story Barbara. I too wonder what you did to invoke that negative attention! Our last dog once barked at some crows in front of our house. Afterwards, I didn't notice it at first, but my husband pointed out to me that when we walked along the front sidewalk they would start to congregate and fly from tree to tree and yell at us. I didn't initially piece together why they did this, until it dawned on me that they were following my dog. Thankfully they never attacked us the way they have attacked you. And thankfully they are able to distinguish my current dog (both golden retrievers) from the last one, and no longer chase us!
    in reply to: What is a Crow? #655168
Viewing 17 posts - 1 through 17 (of 17 total)