Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: April 21, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 14

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Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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    Leafblade61
    I loved learning about owls that I had no idea existed! Of course owls live all over the world, but I didn't realize how different they could be! I especially liked learning about super rare owls.
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    Leafblade61
    Sooty owl sure surprised me! When I heard it I said, "There's no way that's an owl". Then, lo and behold, it turned out to be the sooty owl! Owls can make sounds than I ever expected.
    in reply to: Is It An Owl? #802542
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    Leafblade61
    The perch-and-pounce technique kind of reminds me of when flycatchers wait for an insect to fly by before they quickly dart towards and grab their prey. However owls can do this in complete darkness using only their hearing.
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    Leafblade61
    My Great Grandpa, Uncle, and I were backpacking in Idaho by the Soldier Lakes. We were building a fire when my uncle suddenly said, "Look there's an owl under that tree!" We looked and on one of low hanging branches of a pine tree, I saw it: A cute little boreal owl. He was very calm, and let us observe him for quite awhile. We were even able to get several pictures!
    in reply to: Who Is That Owl? #793115
  • Link
    Participant
    Leafblade61
    Activity 1: There's this saying in the introduction in my field guide: "Birding is not an escape from reality. Birding IS reality!" (Kenn Kaufman's Field Guide to Birds of North America.) Birding helps me see the good in the world. For a long time I've seeking escape into other worlds (which is very far from a bad thing!). This shows me that I can still find a lot of good without having to look very far. Activity 2: I'm already beginning to practice citizen science, and I don't even drink coffee. I want to get into citizen science more seriously now after what I have learned. I want to plant more native plants in my family's garden for sure. Single use plastics, get ready to be reused! Activity 4: This course has inspired me to delve into citizen science. I enjoy watching birds and learning about them, so why not use what I learn to help them! As soon as this whole virus thing is over, I'm going to attend the Wasatch Audubon meetings whenever I can. I need to find some people to go birding with.
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    Participant
    Leafblade61
    Activity 1: Trying out different noting types was fun. Drawing was very enjoyable. However, I'm not very good, and I don't think it would help me identify/remember stuff later. I really enjoyed just righting down observations. For example: When somebody scared away the California Gulls, they flew in a huge flock in a circle around the pond and landed down where they had started.
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    Leafblade61
    Activity 1: The first place I went was my front yard, which is in a suburban area. There are a few big trees, and lots of wide open grassy yard. It is also near a busy road, and surrounded by houses and telephone poles. I House Sparrows and House Finches in the trees. I saw starlings poking around in the grass in my yard. I saw doves on the telephone poles. Next, I went to a nearby pond. Here, there is a large-ish body of water with a bridge over it. There's a rock barrier separating a secluded spot from the rest of the pond. There are a few smaller willows. Here, I see many Mallards and coots. I also see Barn Swallows catching bugs over the water and perching under the bridge. I see gulls and cormorants perching on the barrier.
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    Participant
    Leafblade61
    Activity 1: I was watching a House Finch sitting on top of a pole. He was mostly looking around. He fluffed up once and did a little bill-wiping, but not much other than that. I'm guessing that he was mostly just keeping an eye out for predators and his kind. Activity 2:I heard the songs of the American Robin, European Starling, House Finch, and Eurasian Collared Dove. I'm learning that birding is just as much about sound as it is about sight.
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    Participant
    Leafblade61
    Activity 4: Right now, I expect to find House Finches, and a few Lesser Goldfinches. In six months, I'd still expect to find house finches, but I wouldn't see any Lesser Goldfinches. Instead, I might see Cedar Waxwings.
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    Participant
    Leafblade61
    Activity 1: Watching from my yard: European Starling, House Finch, House Sparrow, Eurasian Collared Dove, Mallard, Lesser Goldfinch. (The mallards were a big surprise.) Activity 2: At Antelope Island State Park yesterday, I heard a song in the sagebrush. I couldn't see it, so I pulled up Merlin's most likely. The first bird on the list turned out to be what I was looking for: Western Meadowlark. Activity 3: Birds that I didn't know were in my area: Barn Swallow, Ring-necked Pheasant, Lazuli Bunting, Double-crested Cormorant, and Yellow Warbler.
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    Participant
    Leafblade61
    Most of these were done from my yard. Activity 1: European Starling and House Finch. The starlings have long, slender bills. The finches have a lot stubbier bills that are taller. The starlings are a lot bigger than the house finches, they are about the size of a robin. The finches are sparrow-sized. Activity 2: The European starling, Eurasian Collared Dove, and House Sparrow, all sport the color black. The European starling is all black with brown speckles.The male House Sparrow has black as a sort of bib and as spectacles. The Eurasian Collared Dove only has black on the "collar" on the back of it's neck. Activity 3: The European Starling (there are a lot by my house if you couldn't tell,) likes to probe in the ground for bugs to eat. Robins do this, too, but like to pull up whole worms! I've seen house finches eating the leaf buds on one of our trees. Activity 4: Red-tailed Hawks vary in color pattern, but usually have brown backs and heads, and can have tan undersides with black speckles. Their cry is a high, piercing KyEEAAHHH. They often glide high on thermal drafts, then descend with claws outstretched to snatch their prey.
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    Leafblade61
    That is SO cool! We've got a pair of Red-Tailed Hawks in our neighborhood, but having raptors nest right outside your window? Lucky!
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    Leafblade61
    Also forgot to mention that when they land in my neighbors tree, the fling chunks of bark right off!
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    Participant
    Leafblade61
    20200421_124807-1This picture isn't the best, but I've been able to find multiple Downy Woodpeckers in my yard over the past month or two. The first time I saw one was a while before I started birding, and it totally took my by surprise. "Wow, a real woodpecker! I thought I'd have to go deep into the mountains to see one!" I love how they creep up the tree. They stay for a while, and when they take off you can see all the spots on the wings!
Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)