Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: May 27, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 27

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 27 total)
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    Sometimes I like to draw birds I'd like to see, so that I get to know their points of distinction, especially if they are hard to tell apart at first, like sparrows or terns. It's always a great moment when I draw a bird and then see it because I notice the details so much more clearly.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I like to read about people who have outdoor adventures, past and present. Two of my favorites are Labyrinth of Ice and Swimming to Antarctica.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    IMG_2866 It took me a year and one day to get this course completed. I think my final bird looks kind of worried, but overall has better proportions than the portly one I first drew. I used the idea of looking at negative space to get the body to be more accurate. From taking the course, I also learned to do the background all at once to start, instead of afterward and I had a lot less color bleeding that way. When I did my first painting, I didn't know about letting the layers dry and everything kind of bled together. In the second attempt, I was able to get more details on the stomach stripes and leaves, from layering and using a smaller brush. Overall, I think the second picture reflects more of the actual bird and the first one is more of the idea of the bird. I still need a lot of practice, but I did make progress! Thanks for the wonderful course.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I love how the watercolor kits are so easy to carry but I once forgot to bring a paper towel for drying/wiping my brush. It made things a lot harder. So now I carry a little pencil box with scratch paper and paper towels to throw in with my personal kit. I find I have the hardest time waiting for the paint to dry and when I don't, sometimes the colors run together, like the yellow in this Seaside Sparrow's face. Also, eyes are hard to get right! IMG_2667
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I tested out all of these techniques. I can see that the wet on wet would be great for backgrounds, but it's kind of unforgiving. I wonder if it dried, if I could do a wet on dry over it. I am going to need more practice to master the texture of dry on dry with a water brush. In the future, I will try the wet on dry for detail work and dry on wet for large areas of color.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I found this to be harder than I expected. I had trouble regulating the amount of water that was going into the paint. I found the beak of the bird color to be the hardest to mix because it isn't a bright yellow, but when I would put in darker colors, it was easy to overpower the yellow and I would start over again. I can see how experience makes this easier! IMG_2512IMG_2508
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I feel like I still need to work on shading to create depth and contrast. I think putting in more hours would help! I found the squint test to be the most helpful. I'd never really thought about using a technique like that to see the lights and darks when drawing.  IMG_2483IMG_2484
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I found the markings on the belly and feet to be the hardest. I think it turned out better upside down than it would have right side up. IMG_2452
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I find it challenging to get the proportions right both horizontally and vertically. It's certainly more easy when it is from a photo or a subject that holds still, like a landscape. I do feel that it helps to use this technique. I saw that Liz used an actual ruler when she drew the plant in the last video and it seems like a helpful tool to try out in the field.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I noticed the movements of the birds because often it made them easier or harder to draw. For example, the house sparrows would hop from the feeder to the ground (out of view) but the pigeon would slowly strut around. The wing bars on the Goldfinch really popped out to me in  away it hadn't before I drew it. I was surprised to see a squirrel show up!IMG_2446
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    It seemed that I did better when I started on the top side of my subject. It also helped me to look at the negative space around the subject. IMG_2441
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    Leaf ComparisonWhen I first looked at these two leaves they seemed very similar to me, but after drawing and comparing them, I noticed differences in may things, such as the shape of the points and veins. I also noticed many subtle differences in color.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I find it helpful to review the student work as they go through the process, to make sure they do not get too off-track before they start the experiment and interpret the data. I do check-ins after they have their question and hypothesis, when they have designed their experiment and declared their variables, when they make their charts, and finally, after they have completed their finished project. These are not always on a rubric, sometimes I will just quickly ask, "tell me about your question" or "what data have you gathered so far?"
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    Sometimes students make conclusions that are not substantiated by their evidence. Having them slow down and review what their finding really are, often gets them back on track. Leading questions that often work are, "Can you prove this?" and "I'm not convinced. Tell me more." Once they talk through their argument, most students catch their flaws.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I researched the eBird site. It tracks citizen science sitings of birds to track where they are seen. There are many ways this data is sorted. Anyone has access to the eBird site, although to enter data, one must have an account. I could see students use this especially around bird migration. With data sets from around the world, eBird can show us where birds go and what distances they travel.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I encourage students to ask questions and try to come up with hypothesis whenever possible.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I did the FeederWatch citizen-science project. Overall, I felt that it was successful and a great learning experience. The challenges were that some days there were hardly any birds and other days there were so many it was quite distracting. I could see students getting engaged in this but how to work it into the schedule when the birds are not on a schedule could be tricky. Learning outcomes would be inquiry, chart making, data collection and predictions.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    Students tend to mirror what their teacher model and encourage, so often stating my own wonderings out loud. Also, providing positive feedback for students who observe and wonder is important.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    Since I live in a large city, I found the competition between natural and industrial noises to be interesting. So many sounds exist to get the attention of humans, such as car horns and ice cream trucks, while the birds and cicadas are trying to make themselves heard without us in mind at all.
  • Crystal
    Participant
    Crystal T
    I feel that getting outside and doing inquiry would be the best thing for my students, who spend most of their lives indoors. Ebird and Budburst seem to fit well both with the age group I teach and the curriculum.
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 27 total)