Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: August 2, 2020
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Replies Created: 12

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Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Beth
    Participant
    Activity 3: I don’t think I’m using the Merlin bar chart feature correctly because all that came up for me were American robin, common grackle, northern cardinal, and house finch. I’ve already seen all those in my back yard.
  • Beth
    Participant
    Activity 2: Used Merlin’s “Most Likely” feature and the first five birds on their list for my town are already listed in my birding journal for today (meaning, I’ve already seen them in my back yard) — American goldfinch, gray catbird, mourning dove, blue jay, northern cardinal
  • Beth
    Participant
    Activity 1: I keep a birding journal in which I record the species I see each day and other interesting (to me) observational notes. I’ve noticed that there is usually a little flurry around 1:00 or 1:30. When I can, I sit and watch. Today’s flurry featured 2 American goldfinches, a downy woodpecker, a nuthatch, 2 chickadees, and a blue jay. Items of note during the flurry: 1) this is the first time the goldfinches have spent a good amount of time at the feeder, usually they’re here and gone in a flash, 2) this was the first time a chickadee checked out the new bird bath we installed last week, it didn’t drink or bathe, just looked, and 3) the chickadee checked out the bird house which we recently elevated about 3 feet higher than it was before, spending a good amount of time on the perch and popping its head in to look around. For a new birder who just started birdwatching shortly after we moved here in late May, gradually adding feeders and other amenities, all these “firsts” are exciting, as is seeing our guest list growing day by day!
  • Beth
    Participant
    Activity 4: I cannot choose a favorite bird, but I will pick one of my favorites, the Northern cardinal. Body size between a sparrow and a crow, solid red coloring with black near the eyes, red crest. Forages on the ground for food.
  • Beth
    Participant
    Activity 3: Three types of birds searching for food in my yard today — chickadee (feeder and carries it away), Carolina wren (suet feeder, foraging suet from underneath the feeder, occasionally the regular feeder), female finch (the regular feeder, hangs out for quite awhile — and I have noticed will even do so in the rain!). Since these are regular visitors to my yard, I have already identified them.
  • Beth
    Participant
    Activity 2: From the birds I see in my yard at this time of year, I’ll pick two sets with common colors. A set of four with white, gray, and/or black coloring — chickadee, nuthatch, catbird, downy woodpecker. A set of four with primarily brown coloring — house wren, Carolina wren, female house finch, and sparrow. Out of all these birds, the only one I have not identified is the sparrow. By that I mean what type of sparrow. I showed my photos to a birding friend and she thought it was a song sparrow. Another birding friend sent me a sparrow chart but I haven’t taken the time to try and make a specific identification yet. Birding friends are some of the most wonderful resources for information, and they tend to be very generous with their knowledge!
  • Beth
    Participant
    Activity 1: Two birds feeding at my feeder today, the chickadee and the nuthatch, have very similar coloring. The chickadee is smaller, but their body shape and orientation at the feeder sets them apart. The chickadee faces in toward the food port with a rounded body. The nuthatch feeds upside down. It also looks outward quite a bit at the feeder, which makes its body a crescent shape. So size and body orientation tell me at a glance who is who between these largely white, gray and black birds.E0B52A6C-3BAE-4D06-99EA-E96A69C20087E81E0C30-7161-4219-847F-11DE167CEADB
  • Beth
    Participant
    Activity 3: It is impossible for me to choose a favorite. But the bird I will select for this purpose is the catbird. The reason is because it is like my little buddy — 9 times out of 10, the first bird to show up in the morning and the last to leave in the evening. It is not shy, and likes to be seen *and* heard. Sometimes there are two together and they act like squabbling siblings or spouses, vying for the same spot on the suet feeder and chasing each other around. Cheeky catbird! AA0E028A-5E64-4FB4-BDF0-61548F6143B7
  • Beth
    Participant
    My selections from three groups are: 3) Hummingbird (hummingbirds) - I did not know we had hummingbirds in my neighborhood and I was stunned one more to have one come through our garden to nosh on the hosta blossoms. I was unprepared and did not get a good photo. A few days later, it came through again and I was ready on the second pass. I hav been a birder since May 21 (2020) and this is my favorite photo that I’ve taken so far! 20726A29-FCFF-483F-9363-F65DB80147DD
  • Beth
    Participant
    My selections from three groups are: 2) Downy woodpecker (woodpeckers) - I have only seen the female but I would love to see the male with his bright red patch. She feeds at our regular feeder regularly and I have also seen her in a tree. Her black and white coloring is quite dramatic. She has only been to the suet feeder a few times that I’ve seen but that’s where I was able to catch a picture of her. Still working on getting a better photo, but she comes and goes pretty quickly!A35470DA-FEEA-49EC-98D4-060BABF35AA0
  • Beth
    Participant
    My selections from three groups are: 1) House wren (songbirds) - we had a male house wren build a nest in our birdhouse but it was not selected by the female to be used. (I am new to birding as of May 21 when we moved to our new bird-blessed home and I learned that the male builds about 3 dummy half nests, then the female selects the one she wants to use and finishes the nest herself. Here is the male working on the nest. E41D8A52-412F-41C3-966C-1A28750867CA
  • Beth
    Participant
    I voted for the northern cardinal on the Wall of Birds. There is something so dramatic about the cardinal’s vibrant solid red color — simple and bold — that I just love. I call the one who visits our yard regularly Mr. C (often accompanied by Mrs. C). There is a regal air to the cardinal and when he perches up high, as in this photo of him at the top of our tallest fir tree, he looks like the king of all he surveys. Yet close up, when he forages underneath the feeder, there is something just a bit comical in the way he moves his head and appears 78533F94-B6FE-4CE7-8E69-A22B9DE176ECto be perpetually puzzled. That combination of qualities, along with his stunning coloring, endears him to me, and that’s why he gets my vote.
Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)