Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: December 28, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 11

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
  • Karly
    Participant
    Fun! I'm having some trouble with the dry brush technique, the brush really does retain a lot of water. There is a lot of waiting involved in many of these which requires some getting used to, but the watercolor is really fun and rewarding when you get it right!
  • Karly
    Participant
    I usually work in acrylics and have only played around with water colors - its so much harder! Mixing colors is challenging but I think just requires more practice. I found it hard to keep the water from shrinking back into a droplet rather then spreading into a larger amount, if I add more water it washes out, so it requires a lot more color from the palette than you think. The amount of brush washing is more than you think as well. You touch a color every few seconds, and you need to wash out the old before adding more of another. just a lot more steps than you would think. But overall its been fun to experiment and I think just requires more practice!
  • Karly
    Participant
    I tend to want to draw in sections and I need to remember to try and focus on the shapes and then refine from there. the negative space and proportion skills are so useful but I always get deep into the drawing before I realize I forgot to use them. all of these tool have really been helpful!
  • Karly
    Participant
    this exercise is strangely calming. its hard to disassociate it from what you categorize it is, but it gets better as you go along. i enjoyed it!
  • Karly
    Participant
    the proportion and negative space tools are really helpful! they seem obvious once you use them in practice but they would never have dawned on me unless I learned them here. I think proportions are easier to measure on things with more solid structure - I was drawing a jade plant and I kept either drawing the leaves too big or little, even though proportionally the main stalk was accurate. I had to go back and check a few times for each area.
  • Karly
    Participant
    this is very helpful. i can really better pay attention to the behaviors and see details in a  new way.
  • Karly
    Participant
    this was a fun exercise. it helps to keep things light and not take your work too seriously. I tend to get fixated on my drawings so this is a great way to loosen up and also work on the mind and hand connection.
  • Karly
    Participant
    IMG_0748I compared pine trees - two different types. It as interesting to see the differences once you started to compare. I made an observation while comparing that I don't think I had really registered before - the pine tree on the left had needles along all aspects of the branch, whereas the one on the right had a lot of bare branch exposed. I didn't have as much time as I wanted to really get into more detail but I absolutely love this method and plan to do this more often!
  • Karly
    Participant
    IMG_0652I did my sit spot at my window that opens to my fire escape. Since I've been working from home, I've been able to watch and observe all the changes over the seasons, who comes to feed at what times, etc. I have a few regular visitors that showed up today and I was able to include in my sketches, along with a new visitor! I included Stewart, a squirrel who comes to eat the seeds from my halloween pumpkin, peanuts, and bird seed. He's become a hit with my friends, he is very photogenic. Then there is Dolly, a one-legged dark-eyed junco who likes to feed by herself or wait for other juncos to leave. Today she sat alone on my windowsill for a full 15 minutes just watching. She also bounced a little from the balancing. A female cardinal also showed up, which was a new fire escape sighting for this winter and I was very excited she paid a visit! As I was sketching, I started with something to anchor me that I felt might be the larger item, which was the bush/tree to the left of the fire escape. Then I placed the other animal visitors in open spaces and filled in some notes. This sketch isn't too out of the box, so i'd like to continue to play with different ideas for formats.
  • Karly
    Participant
    1. How did you feel about drawing from the photo? What came easily and what was challenging? I felt great drawing from the photo. When I draw, I prefer photographs or still images to draw from because I can take my time and really study and take in detail. The head shape, beak placement and some detailing was a bit challenging, but I found the rest to be easier. The branches and leaves came the most easily. I also found that I was very nervous to add color! I'm not good with watercolors and was worried I'd ruin the sketch. 2. Was there anything in the photo that you might not have noticed if you weren’t asked to draw it? Would this make a difference when nature journaling? I don't think I would have noticed the 3 individual toes curled on one of the warblers feet. this would make a big difference  when nature journaling because it gives you more data to take note of.IMG_0577
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #773917
  • Karly
    Participant
    1. What inspired you to begin nature journaling? I have loved both art and nature since I was a kid. I've done some nature journaling but really want to take my sketches to the next level. I'm in particular excited to learn more about watercolor technique because I have always found that to be a difficult medium. With the pandemic, I work from home and have developed a lovely backyard nature observation practice and have jotted down what I see each day. I want to now pair that with some sketches! 2. Now that you’ve heard from several other journalers about their processes, and had a peek at their journals, which ideas or approaches do you want to try? I definitely want to incorporate some better watercolor techniques and experiment with different page layouts.
Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)