Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: April 29, 2018
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 10

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Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Pamela
    Participant
    I was most impressed with the migration maps drawn from ebird data! Fantastic! It is something I will refer back to. Every year I keep track of when I see the first and last hummingbird in my area (southeastern Pennsylvania). I try to have nectar feeders out and appropriate plants in bloom. This year my columbine was in bloom in early May when the ruby throated hummingbirds returned.  We are currently in the midst of a severe drought, and though I am watering my garden, I do not have much natural food for the hummingbirds. I hope I will have enough natural food sources for fall!
  • Pamela
    Participant
    When I am outside gardening, I usually hear the hummingbird before I see it (because my attention is on the task). Now I know how that buzzing sound is produced through the amazing structure of the wings and their motions - creating lift on the downstroke and upstroke. Fascinating.
  • Pamela
    Participant
    I have been putting out nectar feeders for out ruby-throated hummingbirds here in southeastern Pennsylvania for a number of years. The funniest thing I ever saw was a juvenile wren who landed on the support for the nectar feeder and looked in absolute wonder at the hovering hummingbird feeding!
  • Pamela
    Participant
    Hi Madalyn - I get intimidated too - but remember you don't have to do everything at once. You can phase it in as you get to know the property.
  • Pamela
    Participant
    Last year I planted a number of new native plants and they did not do as well as I had hoped.  There are some areas of my yard where I have trouble finding just the right plant for the conditions. So last summer I made a map of the yard and went outside on the hour, every hour from arising to sunset to observe which areas were sunny, shady or partly sunny.  As a result, I was able to map how many hours of sun each area received.  Some areas gave me a surprise, since trees had grown up and blocked areas that I assumed to be sunny. Armed with this data, I hope to make better choices this year. The most challenging areas are around the bird feeders - because I need to be able to clean up around the feeders, yet provide protection for the birds.
  • Pamela
    Participant
    I live in southeastern Pennsylvania in a mixed rural/residential landscape. I am keenly aware that development has encroached on habitats for many creatures and birds. When we moved into the house, I was delighted with the large flower garden created by the former owner. But after observing the birds, and particularly the hummingbirds, I have started removing the hybrid cultivars planted by the former owner and am phasing in native plants. The change is remarkable - I now have butterflies I have never seen before, and the hummingbirds return every spring!  This winter goldfinches and juncos are feasting on the rudbeckia seeds! So, it is well worth going the whole way to plant all natives.  We have dozens of mature white pines, and some deciduous trees - but we need some understory plants and bushes.  The goal is to add some bird houses - and have plants that the deer won't devour!
  • Pamela
    Participant
    When I lived in a town of a population of 10,000, crows were a common site around trash bins of shopping centers.  I do not remember seeing any nests in our neighbor and we lived beside a park. One day in July when it was above 90 degrees, hundreds of crows flew to a very large oak tree on the next street. The din of their calls was tremendous. I walked over to see what was going on.  Several birds were challenging each other, all were vocalizing. This went on for over an hour. What was this, some kind of convention? the crowning of the chief crow?
  • Pamela
    Participant
    Yes, the crows in our area appear healthy. However, last winter we had a crow with an injured foot.  You wouldn't know it was injured except he/she did not put any weight on it.  He was part of a family of 5 individuals.  I think they were the ones in the nest in our neighbor's tall white pine. The family did not nest in that site this year. Come to think of it I did not see much of them beginning in March. A good number of years ago (maybe 7 or 8) my husband found a young crow on the ground who could not manipulate either of its feet. We kept an eye on it, but when the local fox came around, we set the crow on top of a yew bush where it was supported in the boughs. We were hoping to see the mother come to its assistance.  Unfortunately, the crow was deceased the next morning.  It was odd in that it did not look sick externally - no wounds.
  • Pamela
    Participant
    My husband likes to put peanuts on our platform feeder, but it is too small for crows to land on, instead they are snatched up by the jays and a few intrepid tufted titmice.  When we throw some peanuts on the ground, the crows can see the activity of the jays or squirrels who are usually the first to spot them.  One or two crows give their call and triumphantly fly in to the dogwood tree and take possession of the peanut territory. Then other crows (I presume younger ones) will fly to the ground to partake of the feast.
    in reply to: Creative Crows #636273
  • Pamela
    Participant
    1. I would tell my neighbor that our local squirrels and chipmunks are the more likely nest raiding culprits. 2. Last year there was a crow's nest in our neighbors tall pine tree. I enjoyed watching the crow couple's teenage crow assisting with the young ones. 3. Ebird reports crows and ravens in our area. I have not confirmed a sighting of a raven yet, it is one of my goals. We also have fish crows in our area - every dusk 50-60 birds or more fly from the lake/marsh area at our local county park, heading north. They occasionally land in a clump of trees, then is disagreement all take off again. They also work on flushing out all hawks in their path. 4. The crow is my bird watching companion in that he tips me off to any hawks in the area. Here in southeast PA we have nesting pairs of Cooper's hawks, Red-shouldered and Red-tailed hawks. The birds at our feeders take their cue from the crows, who act like the local sheriff in our neighborhood.
    in reply to: What is a Crow? #636222
Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)