Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: January 19, 2017
Topics Started: 1
Replies Created: 5

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Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • TPW
    Participant
    tom.wnuk
    I concur. The size, larger than Sparrows and the white stripe above eye towards back of head are what I use to ID them. Having the males visit is also further likelihood that it’s what Frankie indicated.
    in reply to: New to the feeder #699823
  • TPW
    Participant
    tom.wnuk

    @Sandy Yea, I figured based on their abundance and that you said you’ve been identifying these hummers for years but I thought I’d take a shot at it.  Maybe it’s some hybrid.  The pic will help for sure.  It will be interesting to see if the Merlin app can ID it once you have the picture.

  • TPW
    Participant
    tom.wnuk
    Does she look like this? see attached pic. Screenshot from birding app. They are very common in your area. copyrighted image removed
  • TPW
    Participant
    tom.wnuk
    Noah, Check out eBird.org for the hotspots in Vermont. It’s probably the best resource for you right now until you discover the best places near you. I’ve attached a screenshot of the top hotspots as of today in Vermont based on other Birders in Vermont.  You can also zoom into your town too and you’ll start to see who the other birders are and connect. 020AFA2A-BB83-4931-93EE-9046A5A662BA
  • TPW
    Participant
    tom.wnuk
    Noah, If you haven’t already you may want to do one or more of the following. Apologize if you’re way beyond this level already.
    • purchase a field guide from folks like Kenn Kaufman, David Sibley, etc..
    • Mobile  field guide for your phone such as iBird (they have various versions) and I believe these are available for both iPhone and Android
    • install Merlin and eBird on your mobile phone
    • Enroll in some of the Cornell Academy courses
    These guides and classes will help you understand the basics on what to look for and how to identify any bird.  When looking at Raptors, it’s always harder when looking at juveniles and first hatch year birds. Eagles are significantly larger overall compared to other raptors especially the Hawk family. One thing that really stands out on Eagles are the very large beak and feet. If you compare this to a red-tail hawk, you’ll see the difference right away. Try and compare the beak length the size of their heads meaning the Eagles beak is not only thick with a dramatic hook in front but it’s about 1/2 the size in length of its overall head.  Compare that to a red-tail, which is maybe 1/3 the length of its head.  There are other field marks that you’ll want to look for and that’s where the field guides come in. The best way to learn is to just get out and see as many birds as you can and over time, these things will get easier and you’ll want to tackle the LBJ’s (little brown job, sparrows, etc) or Gulls....now it gets fun and frustrating but you’ll never stop once hooked. Oh, and keep asking questions because it helps everyone, even the best Birders, imho. good luck and happy birding. -tom
Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)