Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: October 9, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 10

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    By trying to match the shade for the chrysalis, I realized the importance of using tint. I also muted the leaves with a bit of red because the original chartreuse popped out too much. In trying to add some mottling, I used too much water and that caused some hard edges. Most importantly, this exercise brought me right back to the beginning because what drove this for me was trying to document the fascinating process of the monarch butterfly. During the week I had been observing the caterpillars and thought they were dying. I was very dismayed. Yet, when I started researching I learned about their 5 molting phases. What a blessing to observe this so closely! I also worried that the metamorphic process was coming too late in the year. Now I know there are 4 generations of monarchs that complete the entire journey to Mexico. By seeing them this late in Virginia, this means that what I am observing is the 4th generation that will fly down to Mexico and start the 1st generation all over again! imageimage
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    Just as everyone else has said, it seems wet on wet is better for large, more diffuse coloring. Dry on wet tends to be easier to control. For me the dry on dry was the most challenging. I still think my brush just gathers too much 💧. This I need to practice much more. It does help to know I can always go back and add more detail. Yet trying to fix a wet on wet with more wet just made a mess. imageimageimage
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    This was the toughest task so far! It is well timed to bring us back to truly seeing. I feel proud that I took my time with it. image
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    Since it is still winter, I used the animal cams on explore.org to find animals to sketch. In the second sketch, I used the top of the head to the shoulders as my reference. I used that reference for the length of the beak and the vertical proportions of the body. image image With the cat sketch, I used the negative space to define the white fur.
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    imageimageSo I learned to capture the basic shape of the dove with the very round head, oval for the body and then adding the tail feathers became easier. I applied the same strategy with the delightful foxes by seeing the inverted triangle for the head and the two little triangles for ears. To capture the body, the blind contour exercise was really helpful. This was still very challenging and I see why we are told over and over to be gentle with ourselves... so true and hard to do! image
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    This exercise helps me feel like a 4 year old again! It certainly builds empathy for the mental effort and concentration it must be for the kiddos to learn how to write and distinguish letters. This has truly built respect. So... my drawings made me laugh, even as I felt a bit of anxiety and vulnerability in trying to capture the weird lines and proportions. Something else this exercise did for me was to let go (a little bit) on trying to sketch perfectly. I thinks it has loosened me up to sketch more quickly too and lighten up.
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    I was able to notice a lot more detail. Zooming in on the picture helped. It was easy to see the geometrical shapes, oval for the body and a smaller oval for the head. It was challenging to capture the softness of the feathers. I ended up using short strokes. For some reason the beak was challenging and I had to draw is a few times before I got it somewhat ok. The proportions between the body and the legs are off. I wouldn’t have noticed the little hole in the beak if I hadn’t drawn it. I also wouldn’t have noticed the brown stripes in the lower body along the feathers either. Yes, not getting the hole in the beak would have been an important omission.EB750406-080D-4F79-BF87-01284699BEC3
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #743372
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    After reading posts from fellow students, I’m replying to myself as a way of remembering some of their good ideas. One said she wants to include pressed samples. Another student wrote that she wanted a way to capture her elation by drawing her emotion on the page. This reminds me of Holly Ward Bimba’s work that initially inspired me to even think I could start sketching. She gave me a calendar with sketches of items she had foraged in the Virginia woods. I love being able to include real items like this. I also like the idea in one of the videos whereby her sketches surround a month at a time. I think I’ll have to get a lot better at sketching to get there. As others have written, the pandemic and my sudden retirement hold a silver lining in that I now have time to slow down and  savor the minute details nature offers us so quietly.
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    “It seems like the action of drawing it (the scene), puts the emotion into the moments captured.” I love how you phrased this. It truly captures one of the reasons I’ve signed up for this course.
  • Barbara
    Participant
    Bnoel2
    The very first video gave me a sense of surprise and relief because it showed an easy way to give structure to a page. It showed boxes with sketches inside. I though, ‘Oh I can do that!’ Immediately my bit of anxiety at starting this new venture lowered. I also saw with surprise that the sketches were also breaking out of the boxes to provide some energy and movement on the page. As a very beginner who has limited experience with visual arts this gave me both a sense of the familiar and controllable (boxes) and the inspiration to break out of them. Another student entry before mine also mentioned how her environmental value to fill the page was important. This is true for me as well. I can see that the sketches can be small and leave room to write about what I was experiencing in the moment and about what I was noticing about my subject.The same student entry also mentioned how sketching plants might be easier at first and I that is a very good idea to start with. I also like her idea of sketching her garden and particular trees through the seasons. This is something I can also easily do. Another video mentioned using the basic geometric forms (as in the doves) and this is something else I’d like to focus on as I think it will be a good way to more efficiently capture the basic contours of my subject.
Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)