Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: June 29, 2019
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 6

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Linda
    Participant
    LDelk68
    I think you worked it out well. The flower shading picks up the darkest shadowed areas. The stem and leaves in particular look very realistic.
  • Linda
    Participant
    LDelk68
    FC5F8E2E-A285-4365-A4CA-7044926E46EA
  • Linda
    Participant
    LDelk68
    This is a very elegant, believable pear. Sorting out The light and dark values from the colors can be challenging. I think you did that well,
  • Linda
    Participant
    LDelk68
    I get a real sense of the weight and volume of this pear. I bet it would be juicy if I bit into it.
  • Linda
    Participant
    LDelk68
    98B9FF80-2434-4211-BA3F-339F44CD57E5I tried out the different kinds of hatching and blending marks on two sea shells and a dried oak leaf with an immature acorn attached. With the shells, it was easier to see the lightest lights and darkest darks. The oak leaf was harder, as the muted green and ochre colors of the leaf were similar in value, so I looked for the shadows and darkest parts of the leaf to try to bring out value contrasts. That was a challenge, but after several tries, I’m fairly satisfied with the result. I used hatching, cross hatching, stippling, and blending on different parts of the leaf. The journal I’m using is made of heavy, textured watercolor paper, so my pencil marks for different kinds of hatching and shading tend to blend together. I will try some other pencil drawings with a smoother paper, like the one recommended in the course materials list, to see if the different kinds of hatching show up better.
  • Linda
    Participant
    LDelk68
    image1. From my previous drawing experience, I was aware of and looking for the dark and light areas of the bird. What was more difficult was trying to get the proportions correct — the head is too big, the legs too short, and I did not leave enough room for the tail. I tend to draw large. 2. Drawing from the picture helped me see the different kinds of feathers on the warbler, e.g, long, distinct feathers on the wings and tail and shorter fluffier, feathers on the bird’s neck and belly, though I didn’t draw them as well as I wanted. If nature journaling, it would probably be harder to see th see details on a moving bird at a distance.
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #646550
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)