Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: April 19, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 7

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
  • Laura
    Participant
    LauraBea
    Activity 1 - My mother loved birds and always had a feeder and she instilled a love of birds in all her children. I have always felt birds are important but this course has taught me so many fascinating things about them that I think they are even more awesome than I did before. Activity 2 - The one new item for me on this list was the shade-grown coffee. I am not a coffee drinker but my other family members are, and I am going to share with them the importance of buying this type of coffee. I think another way to help birds is to share with others what I've learned in this course. I think the more that people know about birds, the more they will see how special they are and will be motivated to protect them also. Activity 3- When my husband and I have traveled around the country I have often expressed surprise and disappointment that I haven't seen more birds. It seems like there used to be more birds in general. I recall seeing flocks on telephone poles and similar places but don't see that as often. On the California coast I don't see as many seagulls as there used to be, though there seem to be more crows. Activity 4 - As a result of this course I would like to buy a good pair of binoculars and be involved as a Citizen Scientist in reporting the birds I see. I also would like to be able to identify more birds by their songs/calls, and make bird watching part of my travel experiences. I definitely want to learn more about birds and be more involved in protecting birds.
  • Laura
    Participant
    LauraBea
    Wonderful post - thanks for sharing!
  • Laura
    Participant
    LauraBea
    I wish I had reached this part in the course sooner, as I have been observing birds on my daily walk and could have been noting their numbers in EBird. Going forward I downloaded the app but have yet to enroll in the course that gives the essentials of how to use it. I am in Long Island, NY and regularly see Common Grackles, Mourning Doves and House Sparrows at our backyard feeder, and an occasional Blue Jay. I also see Northern Cardinals, American Robins and Downy Woodpeckers while I am out walking, and on occasion a Baltimore Oriole. I will look for a birding group in which to participate once things open up. For now it has been enjoyable to read other people's comments in this course. It has been a very enjoyable course and I have learned a lot. I have enjoyed sharing what I've learned with others.
  • Laura
    Participant
    LauraBea
    Activity One - We just put up a feeder here on Long Island, NY, but birds are taking awhile to visit it. There are a couple of "regulars" already though- one a Downy Woodpecker and another that looks like a Finch. The Sparrows seem to prefer to peck at the seed that falls below the feeder. I have had trouble observing bird behavior for any length of time because they birds in our backyard fly away quickly. Activity Two - I enjoy watching the Cornell Bird Cam. I have observed that the Mourning Doves try to be as inconspicuous as possible when they are at the feeder, particularly when the Grackles show up. The Cardinals are similar and stay on nearby branches awhile until it looks like it's safe to be on the feeder. The Woodpeckers however do not seem as cautious, and once on the feeder, they seem pretty comfortable. Activity Three - I can now identify the Blue Jay's call as well as the Robin's song and that of the Black-Capped Chickadee. I often hear the birds singing before sunrise.
  • Laura
    Participant
    LauraBea
    Before this course I used to wonder why Cardinals were so often pictured in the snow on Christmas cards. Now I know why, they hang around all year! I have found this lesson on migration and viewing the animated migration maps to be fascinating. One of my favorite months to be outdoors is October and yet I now see from the Migration map that many birds are no longer around in the US, having already headed south. I will keep that in mind when I am in the outdoors in a few months. I had no idea about the changing colors of the feathers either. It will make identifying the birds more challenging later in the year when their colors are more muted. All the more reason to learn to identify the birds by their songs and calls.
  • Laura
    Participant
    LauraBea
    After the last lesson, I knew how to locate a "hot spot" so I looked up one near us on Long Island and we went there (wearing masks and social distancing of course). I was disappointed we didn't hear or see more birds, but using the app we could identify a Gray Catbird as well as an Eastern Towhee. This morning on my walk I was able to identify the song of the Black-capped Chickadee which had stumped us on an earlier outing. We put up a feeder but have not attracted any birds yet, so I enjoyed watching the bird cam from Sapsucker Woods - I could watch it for hours! A great way to practice identifying birds too.
  • Laura
    Participant
    LauraBea
    It would be interesting and helpful if classmates posting here also included their location.
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)