Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: September 14, 2019
Topics Started: 3
Replies Created: 3

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Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)
  • Jean
    Participant
    cowvet

    @KP3 It didn't sound like a cardinal. Yeah, I often have to hear a bird a few times before I am confident enough on its identity to record it on eBird.  Actually, a lot of what I see and hear doesn't get recorded, because I am unsure as to the birds identity. I did go out this morning and heard the bird in question again. I may put the hi-res recorder back on my phone to try to record it. I heard a second sound coming from the same place: a (quick) low note, followed by a pair of higher notes, followed by a trill. It really lacked the quality of a wood thrush, though. I noted that the wood thrush call that sound like my bird was recorded in Costa Rica four decades ago. Still puzzled. :-)

  • Jean
    Participant
    cowvet
    Thanks for your suggestions, and the reminder that I can use my Merlin app to check out the sounds easily. Of the birds you suggested, the Wood thrush call is the only possible candidate. I can listen for the song of that bird to confirm it. Is there a time of day when I am most likely to hear it? Maybe I need to walk that way earlier in the morning. I also think is could have been a Carolina wren, since we have lots of them here. If so, singing from the woods changed the acoustics enough that it sounded different to me. Those tufted titmice are a challenge. Yesterday, I was sure I was hearing a group of chickadees working through the trees. The movement was quick, like the chickadee. However, when I finally saw the side of one I saw blue on the dorsal portion of the bird. I never got a good look of the crest, but I still think they were titmice that fooled me. I decided to compare the recordings on Merlin, since I was doing that with the thrushes. I think it helped. Thanks again!
  • Jean
    Participant
    cowvet
    Thanks for your suggestion!  I listened to some recordings of Eastern meadowlarks. They generally seem to lack the consistency I heard, so I would say it is less like a meadowlark. It also came from a patch of trees/rather small wooded area. Each of the 5 repeated phrases sounded essentially the same. I had considered the possibility of a warbler, but I don't think any repeat phrases 5 times with regularity.
Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)