The Cornell Lab Bird Academy Discussion Groups Joy of Birdwatching Activities: Exploring Bird Habitats

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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      Share your experience participating in this lesson's activities. Comment on as many or as few activities as you'd like.
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    • Cindy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Firebird56
      Activity 1: In my suburban backyard, I have observed house sparrows, cardinals, robins, blue jays, goldfinches, pine siskins, crows, red bellied woodpeckers, house finches, Carolina wrens, dark eyed juncos,  and cedar waxwings at various times of the year. Just south of my home is a park with a creek running through it, a restored prairie with various tall grasses, and an open area where people fly kites. In the open area, a red tailed hawk caught something on the ground and ate it. On the trail through the tall prairie grass, I ran into a male ringed neck pheasant which also hangs out in the shrubs along a fenced area near the park. We have nest boxes for tree swallows at this same park and we get to watch their aerial acrobatics in the spring. Of course, we also have plenty of red winged blackbirds who nest along the creek and sing during the summer.  Mallards also visit this same creek. Many of my backyard birds such as the robins and sparrows are easy to spot at the park, too, but the red winged blackbirds stay near the water along with the ducks.
    • JackBird21
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      TBMachine
      Activity 2: I chose to review the species reported on eBird Checklists at Roger Road and Mt Lemmon in Arizona for this exercise. At Roger Road, I am guessing this is a lowland - wetland habitat as ducks, grebes, Coots, Egrets were observed.  Also birds that prefer to be near the edge of water with some trees like woodpeckers and hawks, and low brush or high grass like sparrows and flycatchers. At Mt. Lemmon - ravens, jays, nuthatch, woodpeckers, wrens, bluebirds, thrush, crossbill and warblers were observed.  I am guessing that this is not a water habitat, but a mountainous habitat with trees and low brush were these species can forage and hide from predators.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      patofvta
      Activity 1.  I have some settling ponds that are down by the Harbor and an estuary of a small river that does not flow year round.  Even though these two locations are only a mile or so apart both areas have habitats quite different.  When I am at the estuary, I am likely to see a lot of shore birds like Willets, Sanderlings, Marbled Godwits, Long-billed Curlews, Sandpipers, several Gulls, Brown Pelicans, and during breeding with luck Snowy Plovers and Least Terns. The settling ponds have lots of waterfowl like Mallards, Gadwalls, Ruddy Ducks, Canadian Goose as well as a wide variety of migrant birds.  Western Grebes, Eared grebes, Pied-billed Grebes, Clark’s Grebes, and American Coots are often sited.  There are Great Blue Heron, Black-crowned Night-Heron, Great Egrets, and Snowy Egrets year round.  There are lots of scrubs and bushy trees so that brings Tree Swallow, Belted Kingfisher, Black Phoebe, Say’s Phoebe, House Sparrows, Song Sparrows, American Goldfinch, Brewer’s Blackbirds, Red-winged Blackbirds, and Great-tails Grackle.  I am amazed at how close physically two habits can be and some birds will be visible in both, but mostly the food for the different species seem keep them apart.   Activity 2.  I checked out the Arizona hotspots for Roger Road and the species list had a large amount of water fowl and birds that marshy areas, I would expect to see a pond or lake with bushes and trees.  I also saw smaller numbers in migrating birds.  I looked up the location and my guess was right on.  I checked out the Mr. Lemmon and with the number of mountain birds, birds of prey, and species that like mountain elevations, I expected wilderness with Conifer and Pine trees.  I looked up the location and was two for two. Pat
    • Claudia
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      cqtull
      1. Silver Springs at the river: Anhinga, cormorants, kingfisher, red shouldered hawk, great blue heron, tricolor heron, and osprey are often seen. In the same park but on the Sandhill Trail there are scrub jays, red headed woodpeckers, quail, red-bellied woodpeckers, towhees, chickadees, and various warblers at different times of the year. Four miles apart and totally different habitats and birds. 2. Down House: seems like it would have woods (woodpeckers) meadows (larks) and not far from bodies of water (various gulls). Sevenoaks must have large freshwater body of water to account for all the ducks, swans, geese with wooded area nearby.
    • Juli
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Juli1321
      Activity 1: For my first habitat that I visited I went to a lake. There I saw the usual things I would expect to see, primarily water birds such as, Great Blue Heron, Great Egret, Little Blue Heron, Wood Ducks, Double-crested Cormorants, Anhingas, Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, Common Gallinule, White Ibis, Limpkin, and Belted Kingfishers. The pond is surrounded by a paved side walk and then wooded area and swampy land so there are multiple habitats in the area. I saw quite a few other birds that are not so dependant on the water, like Eastern Phoebes, Northern Flickers, Pileated Woodpecker, House Wrens, Carolina Wrens, Northern Cardinals, Blue-gray Gnatcatchers, Northern Mockingbird, and a Red-shouldered Hawk. For my second habitat I went to an open field that had been recently mowed. It has wooded area around it and is near a small lake. Focusing on only the open field area I saw lots of Palm Warblers, Northern Cardinals, House Finches, Blue Jays, Carolina Chickadees, White-eyed Vireos, Tufted Titmouse, Brown Thrasher, and Northern Mockingbird. Since I do a lot of birding and visiting various birding hotspots in my area, the findings in each of these areas where not a surprise to me. As you can see, there are some birds that can be found in both areas since the water being present does not deter the birds who like to be in wooded areas or open hunting area. However, you will not typically find the water birds where there is not water, with exception to flyovers. Activity 2: I enjoyed looking at and comparing the hotspots both in Arizona and in England. Much like my own habitat comparisons one was a habitat with water and one without. I could see that the results had similarities to my own results in that, there were water birds at the locations with water but also other birds that can be found in habitats without water. All areas had some birds in common that were non-water birds.
    • Devin
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Devin66
      Activity 1: Since I've started birding, I've mainly visited a local hotspot that has a couple ponds with some shrubs and a few trees. I always see the usual group of Mallards in the ponds, and sparrows among the shrubs. According to Merlin ID, one of the most common types of birds in my area is the Woodhouse Scrub Jay, but I had yet to see one. I decided to try a different hotspot near me that is more forested than the ponds and shrubs I've spent most of my birding time in. Well, I immediately saw about five Woodhouse Scrub Jays at the more forested spot. I also saw a Brown Creeper and a White-breasted Nuthatch that got added to my life list. I was happy to have the experience of finding different habitats that are still so near. Activity 2: Looking at the species list for Roger Road WRF, there are some waterfowl listed (Mallard, American Wigeon). There must be some body of water at that location. Mt. Lemmon's species list lacks any waterfowl, but lists hummingbirds, flycatchers, and warblers. I would guess Mt. Lemmon is a high desert habitat with scrubby shrubs.
    • Jon
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      jekielty
      Activity 1 : Yesterday I went birding on Randall's Island here in NYC. I visited 3 spots on the Island. The first spot, known as Little Hellgate, was a small salt marsh with some some minimal trees that run alongside the water.  In this area I watched yellow rumped warblers flying around in branches chasing insects, pine siskins and house finches perched in the top of the trees, a juvenile black crowned night heron fishing in the shallow water, and a double breasted cormorant swimming for fish. The second location I stopped at were the ballfields. This area was open and grassy and was abundant with different species of sparrows and some palm warblers. The last area is known as Bronx Kill and is a small inlet where I saw Canada Geese and Mallards resting in the shallow water before they began the next part of their migration.
    • Luke
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Lukins
      Activity 1: I am fortunate that the place where I live has multiple habitats; a stream, a brushy wetland area, a forested area with coniferous and deciduous trees and a scrubby meadow. In the scrubby area I have purposely let wild plants go to seed and I call it my living bird feeder. Right now it is home to a large group of goldfinches that are here all day everyday. There are also three kinds of sparrow. Phoebes and wrens love to hunt insects in the scrubby meadow. In the summer, before the flowers faded it was frequented by many hummingbirds. Right now, in the forested area I am seeing woodpeckers, nuthatches, chickadees, brown creepers, vireos, warblers, and titmouses.
    • Luke
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Lukins
      Activity 2: Reading the species list for Roger Road, Tucson AZ it is obvious by the number of waterfowl, grebes, shorebirds, gulls, cormorants, herons, ibis and their allies that there is a body of water there: and judging by the presence of vireos, woodpeckers, waxwings etc there must be some trees as well. Indeed the satellite imagery on e-bird maps reveals a green oasis with ponds. An interesting thing I learned is that the Sweetwater Wetlands was constructed in 1996 to retain and reclaim secondary effluent and filter backwash from the Roger Road wastewater treatment plant. It seems that if you build it they will come! the Mt. Lemon species list suggests an upland, forested habitat, again, confirmed by the satellite image.
    • Jessica
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      jessbird22660
      As I peruse my neighborhood I see a plethora of Chipping Sparrows as well as the same feeder suspects such as Black-Capped Chickadees, Tufted Titmice, Mourning Doves.  Venturing out a little further I had the privilege of seeing a Brown Thrasher and a Northern Mockingbird perched on top of a house going through its variety of sounds.  When I float the river I get to see Blue Herons, Eastern Kingbirds, and Kingfishers.  Sometimes I spot an Eagle and plenty of Osprey!
    • Allison
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      AKirchner1979
      Activity 1:  I've kept lists of birds in my suburban backyard (feeders) and a nearby wooded park along the river.  Being a beginner, I was surprised to see the same birds in both locations.  I think of my feeder birds like pets and hadn't expected to see them "in the wild."  There were a few new birds near the river, most notably the flocks of Canada Geese this time of year.  I've selected two more spots to explore later this week, both an hour from my home in different directions:  Green Spring Garden Park in Alexandria VA and Caledon State Park in King George VA.  I've been studying the eBird lists and especially the bar charts (which I find to be extremely helpful).  If I'm lucky, I might see a new bird (kinglet? towhee? warbler?) at Green Spring, and Caledon is famous for its bald eagles.  Green Spring is a smallish park in a developed suburban area while Caledon is old growth forest in a rural area along the Potomac River.  The two locations share the same common birds, but I hope I have time to find a few differences.
    • Olivia
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      NightwingMoonwatcher
      Activity 1 (1). I visit my feeders and I see Red-Winged Blackbirds, Cardinals, Black Capped Chickadees, Red and White Breasted Nuthatches,  and I can't even get to naming them all! (2). We have a marsh near our house and it has Mallards, Canada Geese, Red-Winged Blackbirds, Common Grackles, Goldfinches, American Robins, European Starlings, and more!!! (Plus some Kingfishers...)
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Cynthia_Case
      Activity 1: Another trip: I visited Irvine Regional Park in Orange, CA.  Park of the park is grassy with oak and eucalyptus trees; the other part is arid, shrubby, and wilder.  On the wild side: CA Quail, American Kestrel, a Harris’s Hawk (later learned it had escaped from a falconer!), three Red-tailed Hawks, Acorn Woodpeckers (I usually see them in the oaks on the grassy side of the park), and many others. The grassy area included Indian Peafowl/Hens and chicks, Wood Ducks, Mandarin Ducks, Red-crowned Parrots, Egyptian Geese and goslings, a fledgling Barn Owl, Oak Titmouse, and others.  A great day for birding!AEB388AF-F966-467F-B4BD-23C6ED1E5A45C730511E-56A4-4C95-BCFD-FBB511C70A5DCA8DD223-1EC4-4105-880C-6F52A8CE0F30
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Cynthia_Case
      Oops.  My narrative got separated from the picture below.  One more time.  Yesterday I visited Mile Square Regional Park in  Fountain Valley, CA (Orange County).  I saw some Orange-cheeked Waxbills (pictured below)  foraging with Pin-tailed Whydahs.  Both are African birds that have naturalized in Southern California. In one eucalyptus tree I saw a Downy Woodpecker, Yellow Warbler, Western Tanager, House Wren, Wilson’s Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler. Today I visited the San Joaquin Wildlife Sanctuary as I had heard that three Stilt Sandpipers had dropped in.  They had! Very rare to observe them in our state, except at the Salton Sea. In one pond I observed American Avocets, Black-necked Stilts, Northern Shovelers, Western Sandpipers. Many shore birds pass through here on their southward journey.
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Cynthia_Case
      F1DBB165-E53F-4A9F-8369-33DB1992665E
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Tanagerlover
      Activity 1: I live in the northern part of Los Angeles. In my condo complex on the greenbelt between condos I have observed Hummingbirds, as well as a Black Phoebe who visits and hunts around the same time everyday. I have a Eucalyptus tree nearby and saw and heard a Nuttall Woodpecker. In the Spring the Western Tanagers migrate through and Love the Eucalyptus. They are loud and busy. You can often see flashes of yellow while they forage in the upper part of the tree. I also noticed the appearance of a Red Tailed Hawk when the Tanagers were around. I was quite surprised that I would find any birds in this sliver of green! In Contrast, about 45 minutes away I was bird watching in Ventura. I saw a Juvenile Black Crowned Night Heron in the marina perched on a boat line, watching the water below. There were several Grackles looking for food near the dining areas. On the beach I observed the Long-billed Curlew using his long beak to search for food. There were numerous Hermanns Gulls with the beautiful orange beak.
    • Meg
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      BigYear4ML
      Activity 1: I live in the Washington, D.C. area so I went down to Rock Creek Park. I was at the creek when I spotted a Belted Kingfisher skimming over the creek. I continued on to a wooded pond where I spotted a Green Heron catching some minnows.
    • Karate Mom
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Karate Mom
      Activity 1:  where I go biking, there are two different habitats:  forested and wetlands/shorelines - and very different types of birds are found in each one.  In the wetlands/shorelines, I’ve spotted osprey, cormorants, kingfishers, herons, gulls, a great egret and common terns. In the forested area, the birds are very different. I’ve spotted American goldfinches, sparrows, and cedar waxwings.  Definitely I can see the difference in what these birds prefer in terms of habitats.
    • Lou Anne
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      hostetlerl
      Activity 2. The birds at down house were more forest or open habitat birds and the birds at the nature preserve were more water fowl and shore birds.
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      lisabj
      Looking at the checklist for Roger Road, Arizona, I was struck by the variety of water birds that appeared. That part of Arizona I expected to be dry. Many of the birds listed were what I would expect. Then there were different ducks, the Greater White-fronted Goose, Long- billed Dowitcher, Least Sandpiper listed as high counts. It turns out that this is the location of Aqua Caliente Park and Sweetwater Wetlands Park, major bird watching hot spots. High bird counts for Mount Lemmon were not surprisingly birds that like conifer forests, pine and oak woods as habitat. Some of these birds are the Yellow-eyed Junco, Pine Siskin and the Yellow-rumped Warbler. Mount Lemmon turns out to be the highest elevation in the Santa Catalina Mountains. It is known for hiking in the summer, skiing and is an amazing bird hot spot. Arizona sounds like a beautiful place to visit and a great bird watching destination. Such a diverse landscape.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      markraby
      Activity 1: At the local conservation area I spotted at least three distinct habitats. In the wooded area, I spotted a pileated woodpecker. In the pond, I spotted a mute swan. In the open area, I caught quick glimpses of small songbirds, but wasn’t able to distinguish them by their songs / calls. One day I’d love to be able to identify birds by their vocalizations. I woke up in a tent in Algonquin Park this summer and there was a choir outside of my tent. Would be great to identify them!   Activity 2: I noticed there were Turkey vultures at Mount Lemmon but not as Roger Road. I’m sure that’s just the tip of the iceberg though.
    • Yulia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Koreshok
      Activity 1: I decided to compare river mouth at the beach (aquatic habitat) and some bushes on the side of the road in the abandoned farm fields (scrub-shrub habitat). Aquatic habitat is full of visible and countable birds generally the size of a pigeon or bigger; waterfowl, wading birds and shore birds. With the help of a camera and Merlin ID application I could identify around 24 bird species. For example, comparing my picture of a bird in flight and pictures in Merlin app helped me figure out that my bird wasn’t a Franklin’s Gull, but an Andean Gull.  Both birds are white with gray wings and black heads and both of them can be found at that place. The tips of its wings gave it away. Andean Gull On the other hand, scrub-shrub habitat experience was frustrating. A lot of swooshing shadows of birds the size of a sparrow or smaller. Even a prepared list of most likely birds to see in the area didn’t help much. I couldn’t spot them and had to rely a lot on my hearing. The problem was I didn’t recognize the sounds I heard. The number of bird species I could identify in a scrub-shrub habitat was 9. There were a lot of flying insects and insect eating birds, like Blue and White Swallow. I even spotted a raptor (American Kestrel) sitting on the cables. I also managed to capture a couple of bush residents. Cinereous Conebill Sinereous Conebill Slender-Billed Finch Slender-Billed Finch I need to do a better work on recognizing birds’ flight patterns and songs. Activity 2: I went as simple as ducks need lakes and woodpeckers need trees. Down House: A big variety of Woodpeckers (woods or parks); Sevenoaks: Huge variety of Waterfowl (lakes). Mt. Lemmon: Woodpeckers (woods or parks); Roger Road: Waterfowl (lakes).
    • Tricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      fred daly
      Activity 1:  At our nearby pond I saw about 15 Welcome Swallows swooping low over the surface of the water, catching tin insects that were invisible to me.  Beside the pond there was a group of Australian Wood Ducks who appeared to be foraging in the grass.  In the pond itself there were several Eurasian Coots, who occasionally dived below the surface.  The reed bed at the end of the pond is also home to a large group of starlings.  They fly away in groups during the day to find food, then come back to the pond at sundown to roost for the night.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      LindaJimP
      We live in proximity to woods and to shoreline.  Some woodland birds we have seen are chickadees, cardinals, blue jays and hummingbirds (!).  Some shorebirds we have seen are Canada geese, mallard ducks, and great blue herons.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      tortorello
      Activity 2:  Exploring the species found in the two spots in Arizona (Roger Rd and Mt. Lemmon): It seemed that there were birds associated with aquatic environments at the Roger Rd. site, i.e. ducks, herons, egrets, teal; whereas I could not find a single one at the Mt. Lemmon site.  So Roger Rd. probably has some type of water habitat at the location, whereas Mt. Lemmon is probably devoid of much water habitat. On the other hand, it seemed that at Mt. Lemmon, I found more birds of prey, such as hawks, falcons, kestrel, merlin, osprey.  Although there were these types sighted at Roger Rd., it seemed that there was a greater diversity of these types sighted at Mt. Lemmon.
    • Lydia
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      lpultorak33
      Activity 1: There is a forest preserve that I often visit. In the wooded areas I will see woodpeckers, indigo buntings, cedar waxwings, robins, and small hawks. There is also a pond where I find blue herons and egrets in the water and goldfinches and kingfishers flying around it for bugs. Another area they have is a marshy place where there is usually a green heron and sometimes a killdeer.
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Janetcaperobin
      20200807_161758 Activity 1: This is on the edge of a dam, with lots of reeds all around, the most prolific bird are the weavers, "Cape Weavers" & "Southern Masked Weavers". There are many weavers nests all along the edge of the water, hanging from the reeds. Apart from the weavers, there are" Yellow-billed ducks" and they forage for plants and invertebrates, other birds are the "Eurasian Moorhen" and the "Levaillant Cisticola" The Levaillant Cisticola is a tiny little bird with a high pitched chirp, it eats short-horned grasshoppers, beetles, weevils & flies . I have seen a pair of "White-faced Whistling-Ducks" which are uncommon in my area, a striking duck and apparently feeds at night, they dive down to obtain their food, mainly feed on underwater tubers, also molluscs and small aquatic animals. Vineyards - The "Cape Francolin" walks between the vine rows , the male can weigh up to 980g they eat invertebrates and fallen fruit, then the "Southern Fiscal", perches on the wire holding up the vines and then swoops down on insects or small vertebrates they then impale their prey on a thorn or piece of barbed wire and tear off pieces of flesh. Then there are two types of the waxbills, the "Common Waxbill" & "Swee Waxbill" tiny finches with short wings, normally in flocks found on the vines and on the ground around the vines, they feed on grass seeds and insects especially during the breeding season.
    • Haruko
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      harukob
      I happened to drive through a flat farmland earlier in the week, and some areas were flooded from recent rain.  There were many great blue herons and great egrets, which was an amazing sight.  I sometimes see them at lakes in my neighborhood but not that many at one time.  Also, I think there was a flock of turkey vultures at the edge of the water.  They were very far and it was difficult to make sure they were turkey vultures, but I think they were because I saw many turkey vultures circling in the sky prior to that.  They were just "hanging out" with some of them stretching their wings, together with other species, and I didn't know they would hang out by the water like that.  They almost looked like some kind of cormorants from far, but I don't think we have cormorants in my area.
    • Jamies
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Jamies007
      Activity 1: I live in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. I usually drive almost 30 minutes to the nearby park, Lois Hole Centennial Provincial Park in St. Albert to watch birds. There are two different habitats in that big provincial park. The wetland area where there were mallards, ruddy ducks, and American Coots. The shrubs around the wetland area where there were Yellow Warblers, Black- Capped Chickadees, sparrow sp. and American Crows.
    • Kimberly
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      ageek917
      In comparing the birds observed in Down House and Seven Oak, I have come to the following conclusions as to the habitat type of each location; Down House- I believe this is a mixed woodland habitat. Many of the birds observed here rely on either a forest habitat or meadow habitat. The Cool Tit and Sparrow Hawk rely on woods for nesting and perching. The Red-Kite and the ring neck pheasant rely on open fields for foraging, nesting and hunting. Seven Oak- I believe this is a marshland with areas transitioning to meadow or heath. Many of the birds observed here rely on open water or marsh for food and shelter. For example the  Greylag Goose, Garganey and little Grebe. There are also birds observed here, like the turtle dove that require a meadow or heath habitat.
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      RuthT1918
      Looking at the Down house and Sevenoaks- Noticed the Great Spotted woodpecker there were more sightings at the Sevenoaks, and variety of birds more diverse. There are larger variety of water birds, birds that live in larger trees. The size of the birds different with larger breeds in the Sevenoaks Wildlife Reserve.
    • Eva
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Toucanny
      Activity 1: I have recently been to a coastal habitat by the Pacific Ocean and a mixed forest habitat at 900 meters above sea level on the Caribbean slopes. In the coastal habitat, I saw: the Common Gallinule, Yellow-throated Toucans (Chestnut-mandibled), the Red-crowned and Hoffmann's Woodpecker hybrid, Scarlet Macaws, and Great Kiskadees. In the mixed forest habitat I saw: lots of different hummingbird species, tanager species, euphonia species, woodpecker species, raptor species, and some other species like the Rufous-tailed Jacamar, the Brown Jay, the Keel-billed Toucan, and the Red-bellied Pigeon. In both habitats I saw woodpeckers and flycatchers, and different toucan species, but each habitat had very different species.
    • Cathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 37
      cgtv123
      For now I will comment on one of my favorite parks and compare it to an ocean or bay visit. My favorite relatively local park (30 min away) is interesting as it has a few mini-habitats within.  It borders a farm (across the street) which I believe grows wheat.  In the Fall I have seen many Canadian Geese there, even sometimes in the Summer.  The walking path goes through an area that has some tall grasses on one side and trees on the other.  In this area, I see mocking birds and sometimes blue birds (my favorite).    The path then goes in the woods where I was delighted to discover, for the first time, some brown thrashers.  Many birds as of yet unknown to me (due to a higher canopy) live there as well.  (I need to learn more calls.)   Of course, the typical birds of the area (cardinals, woodpeckers) hang out here too.  I believe I've heard wood thrushes here.  Here at this park I have also seen (and heard) mourning doves and occasionally red winged blackbirds.  At the edge of the woods, all types of sparrows flit about in the low grass, looking for food. Another favorite place to go is Ocean City, MD or nearby Cape Henlopen, Delaware.  Here I can see birds such as osprey,  piping plovers, sand pipers and sea gulls.  Not far from the ocean is bayside.  Here I can be treated to seeing herons and egrets.  This exercise sure has me wanting to go back to the beach and visit! If I see something else when I do visit either location I hope to report back!
    • rita
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      rlaurance
        Activity #2 Roger Road has to be a very diverse ecosystem- It has to have trees for the woodpeckers, probably buildings or bridges for the swallows, pigeons, although they could live near open water, open water for the herons and Ibis, ducks, and other water and shore birds, and a certain amount of open sky for all the hawks and birds of the open  sky. Mt Lemmon, on the other hand, while a diverse ecosystem, is mainly woods for all of the thrushes, warbles, and flycatchers, and shrub scrub and breaks in the woods for the hawks and hunting birds of the sky-there is a mountain chickadee and a Canyon wren, so maybe there are mountains- a pine siskin, so maybe there are pines- an acorn woodpecker, so maybe there are oaks.
    • rita
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      rlaurance
      Activity #1 I've been birding at Lille park and at Leslie Science Center in Ann Arbor. There is a lot of overlap in birds- robins, cardinals, goldfinches, chickadees, but Lillie Park is near a pond, and a Great Blue Heron flew right at me. I was walking along a path and a robin started giving its alarm call, and a Great Blue Heron flew out of the rushes in the pond almost directly at me, then swerved and hid somewhere in another group of rushes further up the path. I went to look for it but could not find it. There are tons of swallows at Leslie Science Center- I don't know what kind they are, but they may be barn swallows, as they seem to dwell in the eaves of the buildings there. I also came across some woodpeckers- some flickers feeding on the ground and and in a tree. And I both heard and saw a large Hawk fly overhead. Both of those birds could have been sighted at Lillie Park, but the Heron definitely would not be at Leslie Science Center as it is near a woods. There is a pond in the woods, but I haven't birded there as yet.
    • Melissa
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      MelRoa
      I live in San Diego. The house we bought has many palm trees, but those aren't native to the region. Since taking this course, I've realized that birds don't like to hang out on and around the queen and pygmy date palms. BUT around the neighborhood I've noticed they find refuge in the Mexican palm trees. There I've seen Western Kingbirds and Lesser Mockingbirds. I love how this course has made me look up and pay attention. I'm also looking into replacing some of the shrubs on my property with more region-specific varieties.
    • Ken
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Kbaldauff
      Activity 1  We live in central Indiana, have a small pond near our back yard. Our neighborhood has many trees both evergreen and deciduous. It’s the end of July 2020 and the weather has been in the mid 80’s and 90’s for the last several weeks. Bird sightings are fewer but there is still some variety around the pond and at the feeder. Today I’ve seen
      • Northern Cardinals
      • Mallards
      • Blue Heron
      • House Sparrows
      • American Crow
      • Tree Swallow
      • Juvenile Downy Woodpecker
      • House Finches
    • Antonio
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      antcas31
      Activity 1. I live by a lake in NE Kansas.  On my stroll today,  I saw red-winged black birds and eastern kingbirds living in trees and cat tails close to the water. I also spotted killdeer and great blue heron in the same location.  Further from the water I spied scissor-tailed flycatchers, Baltimore oriels,  American goldfinch in the trees and open grassland areas
    • Eric
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      shark_7
      Activity 1: 
      • When I visit the urban park near my apartment, I can see:
      Resident, endemic or exotic
      • White-crowned Pigeon
      • Venezuelan Troupial
      • Shiny Cowbird
      • Red Junglefowl
      • Scaly-naped Pigeon
      • Common Ground Dove
      • White-winged Dove
      • Zenaida Dove
      • Mangrove Cuckoo
      • Antillean Mango
      • Puerto Rican Woodpecker
      • White-winged Parakeet
      • Blue-and-yellow Macaw
      • Puerto Rican Flycatcher
      • Gray Kingbird
      • Pearly-eyed Thrasher
      • Northern Mockingbird
      • Red-legged Thrush
      • Puerto Rican Spindalis
      • Puerto Rican Oriole
      • Greater Antillean Grackle
      • Adelaide's Warbler
      • Bananaquit
      • Black-faced Grassquit
      • Red-tailed Hawk
      • American Kestrel
      • Great Egret
      • Bronze Mannikin
      Migratory
      • Osprey
      • Black-whiskered Vireo
      • Great Blue Heron
      • White-eyed Vireo
      • Northern Parula
      • Prairie Warbler
      • Antillean Nighthawk
       
      • However, if I visit the coast nearby me, I can see:
      Resident, endemic or exotic
      • White-crowned Pigeon
      • Spotted Sandpiper
      • Common Ground Dove
      • White-winged Dove
      • Zenaida Dove
      • White-winged Parakeet
      • Gray Kingbird
      • Pearly-eyed Thrasher
      • Puerto Rican Spindalis
      • Greater Antillean Grackle
      • Bananaquit
      • Red-tailed Hawk
      • American Kestrel
      • Brown Pelican
      • Magnificent Frigatebird
      •  Monk Parakeet
      • House Sparrow
      • Little Blue Heron
      • Rock Pigeon
      • Royal Tern
      • Sandwich Tern
      Migratory
      • Osprey
      • Great Blue Heron
      • Peregrine Falcon
      • Semipalmated Plover
      • Herring Gull
      • Lesser Black-backed Gull
      • Ring-billed Gull
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      jennferguson76
      Activity 1: On my morning walks, there are three distinct habitats: suburban housing, a wooded area, and a park that has baseball fields and ponds. In the housing areas, there are lots of European starlings, American Robins, Crows, House Finches, and Blue Jays. I also sometimes see nuthatches. I've noticed as I get to the wooded area, I still see those same birds, but there is an increase in nuthatches. The pond areas there are plenty of Canada geese and Mallard ducks. Seasonally there are snow egrets and double-crested cormorants. I've also seen killdeer near the shorelines and red-winged blackbirds in the reeds.
    • clara
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      clarys_clgd
      ACTIVIDAD 1 Los lugares que visite fueron: LAGUNA DE ACHOCALLA, que se encuentra en las cercanías de la ciudad de La Paz, Bolivia En este ecosistema pude observar una cantidad importante de especies acuáticas como patos que nadan a lo largo del lago buscando comida a cada instante, garzas que se posan en algunos lugares de la laguna para poder pescar y alimentarse, chocas que se meten entre los matorrales para cuidar a sus crías, sobrevolando el lugar se puede observar vencejos que van comiendo a los pequeños insectos que se encuentran en el lugar. BOSQUECILLO DE AUQUISAMAÑA, que se un área protegida que se encuentra en la ciudad de La Paz. Bolivia En este ecosistema que pude observar aves como los gorriones que se perchan en los arbustos para comer las semillas, loros que se alimentan de las flores y frutos de las plantas que hay en el lugar, también observé picaflores que se alimentan de las flores nativas del lugar, palomas manchada es otra especie que se posa en los arboles mas altos del lugar, así también en los cerros de alrededor sobrevuelan las águilas y halconcillos. ACTIVIDAD 2 La diferencia que encontré entre estos dos lugares en Arizona: Roger Road y Mt. Lemmon, es que en el primer lugar hay aves acuáticas, debido a la presencia de cuerpos de agua en el lugar.
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      nielsenearl
      HABITATS Activity 1: Think of two different habitats near you where you might go birding. Maybe it’s a park and a more urban area, or a field and the edge of a pond. Visit each one and see if you notice different birds in each habitat. Tell us what you find in the discussion.   Mercer Slough Nature Park Trails-4:00 PM Birds Seen:   Stellers Jay, Chestnut-backed Chickadee, Black-headed Grosbeak (immature) Habitat:  Forested, with small ponds and creeks-Slough Results:  Leafy trees got in the way.  Sun angle was bad.  We identified Stellers Jay and Chickadee by their calls.  We had to look up the Grosbeak in the book, which had no immature.  After coming home we looked in another book and made a sure identification.  All of these birds were in the leafy tops of the trees.   Sweyolocken Boat Launch-4:45 PM Birds Seen:  Bald Eagle, Common Crows Habitat:  Open water and Boat Marina—Lake Washington Results:  Easy to identify these two birds!  The eagle was clearly fishing as he was patrolling the waters off the boat docks.  The crows were checking out the garbage spots for any food.  We looked for cormorants, any ducks-didn’t see any!  Decided to try Newcastle Beach Park.   Newcastle Beach Park-10:30-11:30 AM Birds Seen:  Robins, Bald Eagle (adult and juvenile), Fox Sparrow, Chestnut-backed Chickadee Habitat:  Open water and Forested Shoreline-Lake Washington Results:  Had seen ducks and cormorants here before, and were optimistic.  We tried the shore first, and spotted the adult Bald Eagle, with the immature in hot pursuit (for food) over the water.  There was evidence of geese everywhere, but no geese in sight.  Not cormorants, ducks either-not one!  Then we went to the forested shoreline-we saw a sparrow, chickadee, and robins in the brush, but experienced lots more mosquitoes than birds! Conclusion:  Come any other season than summer-before leaves are out.  Birds also will not have migrated and will have more diversity.
    • Shelley
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      ShelleyNagel
      I live in Anchorage, AK and am currently watching a bald eagle nest, common raven nest and red throated grebe nest.   I am close to a small lake.    I have red chested nuthatches and downy woodpeckers that frequent my feeders.   In the winter, I see more black capped chickadees. I'm still learning and hoping to learn more.
    • Marcia
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      m.kaye
      Activity #1: We often go walking in the nearby woods, which is a small forest in the middle of a big town near Toronto. Lately we've seen a lot of woodpeckers -- Red-bellied, Downy and Pileated. We also go to a large conservation area near us, which is mostly open meadows and fields, with some trees and a small lake. We often see Red-tailed Hawks and Song Sparrows there, and last time we saw an Orchard Oriole and an Osprey.   Activity #2: Sevenoaks has a lot more species of water birds than Down House, so I assume there are more lakes and ponds.
    • Jody
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      BookJody
      Activity 1:  First habitat is my backyard in Greenwood Village, CO (suburban).  I have feeders with sunflower seed, three water features, one pinon tree, cotoneaster bushes and lawn.  Since April I have been blessed with Broad-tail hummingbirds, black-capped chickadees, spotted towhees, house finch, goldfinch, blue jays, mourning doves, white-breasted nuthatch, magpies, grackles, song sparrows, house wrens, northern flickers, red-wing blackbirds, american robin Second habitat is in the mountains of Silverthorne, CO (on a golf course).  Pine and aspen trees and some native plants like sage, rabbit brush, sedges in a small meadow.  I have seen steller jays, broad-tail hummers, american crows, juncos, mountain bluebird (my favorite), house finch, american robin, pine siskin, white-crowned sparrow, tree swallows.fullsizeoutput_2a9cP1000064P1000286
    • Louisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      lulu1
      I have been learning about the differences in bird communities by comparing what I used to see when I lived in Gresham, Oregon with my current location in Caldwell, Idaho.  My place in Gresham had a patch of large Douglas-firs, a developing natural area with shrubs, deciduous trees, and native forbs, a small stream, and a lawn area.  Average annual precipitation was about 35 inches and the marine influence was present throughout the year leading to relatively mild winters and generally pleasant summers, although as the climate is warming, temperatures over 90 became increasingly common in July and August. Over the years of watching my feeders, I had over 50 species of birds, some regularly and a few infrequently.  Some of the regular species included wood ducks, house finches, black-capped and chestnut-backed chickadees, Steller’s and scrub-jays, American and lesser goldfinches, dark-eyed juncos, varied thrushes, downy woodpeckers, bushtits, red-breasted nuthatches, song sparrows, Anna’s hummingbirds, and northern flickers.  Less frequent birds included pileated woodpeckers, evening grosbeaks, white-breasted nuthatches, mountain chickadees, rufous hummingbirds, and red-breasted sapsuckers, among others. Caldwell gets an average of 11 inches of precipitation, winters are colder, and summers hotter than in Gresham.  My place here was farmland about 11 years ago.  As a result, vegetation is mostly non-native and relatively young.  The trees are not very tall as yet.  I have been planting native forbs and shrubs in an effort to create better habitat for birds and pollinators.  My backyard bird list is much smaller than in Gresham.  Species present include black-chinned hummingbirds, house finches, house sparrows, mourning doves, Eurasian collared-doves, red-winged blackbirds (still lots of irrigation canals around), Brewer’s blackbirds, California quail, American robins, and brown-headed cowbirds.  Birds have planted sunflower seeds that are now producing sunflowers so I am seeing American goldfinches more regularly.  Over the winter I had a few dark-eyed juncos but they migrate into the mountains for the summer.  A yellow-rumpled warbler stopped by last fall, but haven’t seen one since. A few species are similar to the two places (house finches, the two dove species, American robin) but the numbers are different.  Mostly the differences reflect the difference in climate and in vegetation.
    • Gabrielle
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      gaviots
      We'll share birds from two different types of forest we've recently visited. Near our home in Seattle is a forest where we often see song sparrows, spotted towhees, Steller's jays, Bewick's wrens, and once we even saw a pileated woodpecker. Last week we took a trip to the forests near Sisters, Oregon where we saw Williamson's sapsuckers, white-headed woodpeckers, western bluebirds, common nighthawks, and pygmy nuthatches.
    • Bobette
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Bobettem
      One of my favorite places to go birding it the rookery at UT southwestern. It is in the middle of Dallas, and it has nesting snowy egrets, cattle egrets, and more. The habitat has mature live oaks with an open area, but then it also had some dense understory, that so I can’t see the middle very well. I have been thereafter a storm and it’s interesting to see the amount of fish laying on the pathway. Where did they come from?? I can’t see if there is any water in the middle. I think one of the forks of the trinity river maybe near the area. Vs the my backyard. I have a big open grass area with raised beds that have native plants, it backs up to a green belt with tall mature tree. Not far alway is water where the egrets could eat., but they don’t nest in this type of habitat
    • Hannah
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      hvelde
      Activity 1: I visited the Hamilton Waterfront Trail which is an aquatic habitat. The trail runs between the shoreline of Lake Ontario on one side and some marshland on the other. It is abundant in Red-winged Blackbirds who love to perch on the cattails in the marsh. I also saw some gulls (unsure which species) flying overhead, some terns (unsure which species), and Canada Geese. I also visited Beamer Memorial Conservation Area, which is a more wooded habitat. The trail I walked is right at the top of the Niagara Escarpment and it is punctuated by breathtaking views of the city below (Grimsby). The birds were more difficult to spot in this area, as they were well-hidden in the trees. I could certainly hear them, though. I heard mostly songbirds, but struggled to confidently identify the birds I heard. I saw, and heard, a Bluejay and some sort of raptor. I suspect it was a hawk of some kind. I also saw a couple of robins. At one point, I thought I heard a woodpecker, but it may have been just the trees creaking in the wind. Activity 2: I used the two spots in Arizona. Some of the species that can be found at Roger Road are Red-naped Sapsuckers, Black-tailed Gnatcatchers, Wood Ducks, Hooded Orioles, a few sparrow species, a few swallow species, and Cooper’s Hawks. This leads me to conclude that this hotspot may be a mix of a forested and an aquatic habitat. Some species found at Mt. Lemmon are Swainson’s Thrushes, Williamson’s Sapsucker, many species of hawks, Cassin’s Vireos, and Painted Redstarts. I think this hotspot is a forested habitat, maybe of a higher altitude.
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      pegkahn
      Activity 2. The two British sites, Down House and Sevenoaks, host species or subspecies different from their North American counterparts and appear to be different collections of habitats. At Down House, the 44 total species include birds that frequent a variety of land habitats, including humanly built and humanly frequented ones –gardens, open fields, and young woodland.  For example, the three types of pigeons/doves tend to live in farms and fields, and the corvids and raptors are adaptable generalists. The ring-necked pheasant likes grassland and cropland. The woodpeckers favor woodlands. The Eurasian nuthatch likes deciduous or mixed woodland. The Common Chiffchaff is a warbler that favors wooded and scrubby habitats. (The gulls seemed to be passing overhead).   EBird lists 3 rose-ringed parakeets there, I always thought of the parakeet as a cage bird in Europe and North America, but I gather there are wild populations now, probably escaped from city cages. The Sevenoaks birds, 135 total species/sub-species, inhabit either a water-based or land-based habitat, including deep and shallow lakes, ponds, rivers and riverbed, grassland (scrub) and woodland. The water birds include swimming birds (a great variety of ducks, swans, geese) and long-legged waders and other shorebirds (herons and egrets, a Eurasian Spoonbill, Eurasian Oystercatcher, Pied Avocet, Eurasian Curlew, plovers, snipes, sandpipers, gulls). Kingfishers need water, but I’m not sure into what category of bird they fall. The trees and scrub support woodpeckers, warblers (some live in reeds), swallows,  cuckoos and swifts.  There are also corvids and raptors (Common Buzzard, Red Kite, Eurasian Sparrowhawk, Carrion Crow) with some overlap with Down House species.
    • Catherine
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      cvanderplaats
      Activity 2: since I have friends in England and I've been to and around London, I thought I'd check out the two sites near there, and it was truly amazing to see how obvious the answer to the environment would be: around Down House the largest numbers were meadow and grassland types: pheasant, doves, partridges. The only surprise there were the several types of gulls that were mentioned--perhaps they are like the ones here, having become "urbanized" (and being rather a pest around shopping centre parking lots....). The other site, Sevenoaks, is a nature reserve, very close to Down House  and lists especially various types of geese, swans and ducks--again a very obvious list, as it is located around several small lakes.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      MDV1952
      Activity 1:   One trail near me that is a hotspot for birders consists of open pastures and scrubby fields, wetland and boggy areas and a river.  This habitat attracts birds that like open habitats, wetlands and being near water.  Birds I observed there recently included Tree and Barn Swallows, Red-winged Blackbirds, and an Eastern Meadowlark.   Other bird species that like this habitat have also been sighted here such as Northern-rough-winged Swallows,  Grasshopper, Song, and Field Sparrows and a Great Blue Heron. A second birding hotspot that is near me is in the Blue Ridge Mountains.  The habitat is primarily forested with thickets of mountain laurel and rhododendron.   This area attracts birds species that prefer forested areas.   Birds I have heard or seen there include a Scarlet Tanager, Wood Thrush and  Ovenbird.   Other bird species that have been observed here include several different types of warblers (Cerulean, Hooded, Black-throated Blue, Chestnut-sided).
    • Kenneth R
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      kennethrwindsor
      Activity 2: The more aquatic habitat around Sevenoaks seems to have more waterfowl, waders and shorebirds along with the raptors and others. The open fields and sporadic areas of shrubland around Down House seem much more suite to birds who prefer those types of habitats.
    • Kenneth R
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      kennethrwindsor
      Activity 1: In and around the Lithia Park Reservoir in Ashland, OR we have a Great Blue Heron that comes back in the morning or afternoon, the occasional pair of Canada Geese and the usual Mallards. I have also seen a Belted Kingfisher several times but only in early morning. Yesterday, a Red-breasted Sapsucker was tapping away at tree on the edge of the reservoir. This time of year I have also seen Dark-eyed Juncos and Spotted Towhees foraging around the reservoir. Further up the hill, on one of the partially forested trails above Ashland, the Warblers, Tanagers and Hummingbirds passing through have been seen recently. A few days ago a Cooper's Hawk was hanging out midday, I suppose looking for lunch or digestng the one he just had.
    • Marlene
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      mg47831
      We were able to take a trip to Lake Michigan last weekend. About 2 hours from our home in the Northeast WI. This habitat showed us quite a few different water birds that we don't often see in our area. The most prominent was the seagull. Many of them hover over the lake to catch fish and other food. When Point Beach State park is busy with tourists by the pavilions, the seagulls also love to scavenge for food scraps from them. The other bird we saw was the Cormorants. While they are not as prevalent in this area as the seagulls, they are around. Lastly, we were able to see a killdeer on a sandy, grassy area up from the lake shore. Closer to our home in the woods of Wisconsin, we also have a large lake nearby where we also observe some of these same water birds, but not to the degree we observed at the larger Lake Michigan.
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      PowellS9
      Today I went to a local park to try to recreate a recent virtual bird walk video from the county parks department, where the naturalist showed off the different habitats found in the park and therefore variety of birds common in each one.  The areas I walked through included grassland, upland forest, riparian forest, field, and a little bit of shrub-scrub wetland.  I could hear lots of birds but only see a few.  I was able to notice how the bird songs and calls changed from each area, and use Merlin to identify a few of the calls, like the field sparrow which I heard the entire loop around the grassland but nowhere else.  I'm also positive I heard an owl in the upland forest!! It sounded the closest to Great Horned Owl on Merlin (of the birds I compared it with).  Birds that I saw and ID'd with Merlin were a Warbling Vireo in the upland forest and a Tree Swallow at the edge of the forest and pond. IMG_1489IMG_1491
    • Julie
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      juliehoskins
      Activity 1 - The two areas I visited are a large recreational park near our home and a state park near our home. The interesting thing is that both are about a one mile walk from our home, and they have very different bird life. The recreational park is full of nesting parrots, and ravens emptying the fast food bags. Also the usual pigeons and sparrows. The habitats at this park include sycamore trees and pine trees, and at some times of the year, a small stream runs through it. The state park is a very different habitat, it is very dry chaparral, mountainous with more lush canyons, but otherwise pretty dry.  Today we saw huge birds soaring above the canyons, there were four of them. We saw them about a month ago also, so this must be their habitat. They were soaring at a high altitude, and so I never saw anything but the profile of them in the air. I believe they were turkey vultures, although it is not out of the range of possibility that they were California Condors. We also saw quail - the California State Bird - which I have never seen in the wild before. Pretty fun.
    • Cara
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Yesleks
      Today I visited Sydney Olympic Park where there is a great wetland reserve. I saw a Great Egret, White-faced Heron, and many Black-winged Stilts (which I adore), Black Swans, Fairy Wrens, Swallows, Black-fronted Dotterels, Silver Gulls, Royal Spoonbills, and Chestnut Teal ducks. The water on the reserve is shallow and marshy is many areas, and these were the places the Stilts and herons hung out. The ducks and swans were on islands and banks in the deeper areas. The Fairy Wrens were catching bugs in the shrubby area at the edge, and the swallows just swooped over the whole area, catching lunch. Notably absent were the Red-necked Avocets I saw in the warmer months amongst the Stilts. They must have migrated north for the winter. The pelicans that are usually in the area were also absent, and whilst I did see a few cormorants, they were not present is as many numbers. Hope you norther hemisphere birders are enjoying the abundance of birds in your areas!
    • Mary Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      makelly415
      Activity 2 As others have said, Roger Road must be near some kind of body of water, with over 250 sightings. The list included ducks, so maybe it was a pond. Mt. Lemmon had only 120 species listed and included many hawks and owls, indicating fields and meadows.
    • Mary Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      makelly415
      Activity 1-My favorite place to walk is Croton Point Park in Westchester, NY. It is located on the Hudson but also it has a capped landfill. The meadows of the landfill attracts red-tailed hawks, Northern Harriers, owls, and all kinds of sparrows. Croton Bay attracts waterfowl such as Mergansers, Buffleheads, and Great Blue Herons. It is famous for the Bald Eagles and their is an annual Eaglefest every winter.
    • Wendy
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      wrogan
      Activity 1 I visited a local wilderness park that encompasses coastal sage scrub habitat as well as vernal ponds. In the sage scrub habitat, I observed several species, including a Great-Tailed Grackle and an Allen's Hummingbird. In the ponds, I observed a Snowy Egret as well as a Ruddy Duck. I also saw swallows and terns flying above the ponds, but I was not able to identify the exact species.
    • Nicole
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      rosie2020
      Activity 2: My initial thought,before looking at numbers or recorded sightings would be that Mt. Lemmon would have a bigger variety and see more birds but after looking at both sites more carefully and getting an idea of their location and habitats it makes sense that the number and types of birds. I am guessing a lot of birds migrate through there or make it a pit-stop. It seems smaller birds, song birds are very common whereas at Mt. Lemmon there are larger birds, perhaps less migratory? What an amazing spot that must be- so much to see and it must be pretty condensed because the park is not that big.
    • Nicole
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      rosie2020
      Activity 1 con't Rockefeller Preserve in Westchester County, NY is one of my favorite places to walk, especially around Swan Lake. Lots of different birds to see from those that make their home here most or all of the year Canada Geese to those that are passing through or just here for a short stay- Green Heron. There is so much wildlife to spot at this Park it never ceases to amaze and surprise. It is a welcoming spot, whether it be by or in the water or further into the woodlands or open fields- there is a place for so many species. DSCN4637DSCN4484DSCN4558
    • Nicole
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      rosie2020
      1. Near my parents home in Putnam County, NY, which is a development about 10 years old in which the builder leveled all the trees before building and just now are the new trees and more natural areas coming back. One of the neighbors has a few bluebird boxes hung up and the bluebirds and tree swallows take advantage of them every year. In the same development another neighbor has a few feeders hung up that attract 10-20 American Goldfinches as well as other birds at one time. It is a sparse area, not much other wildlife, some deer, a rare squirrel but the birds seem to have made their way back and found comfortable spots to feed and nest. Turkey vultures and a few hawks routinely fly over head. Canada Geese, Robins, finches, sparrow, swallows and bluebirds are common. Tree Swallow on fenceDSCN4769DSCN4893
    • Charlotte
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Cnemeth
      20200518_182823Tanagers were in the manmade pond/waterfall in my wooded yard. I also see many woodpeckers, cardinals, nuthatches, and starlings regularly. At the lake about a quarter of a mile down, there are blue herons, swans, mallards, geese and kingfishers. Occasionally eagles are present as well.
    • Charlotte
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Cnemeth
      20200518_182823
    • Tricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      tdthrasher
      Activity 1:  Now that some of our local trails have opened, I had a chance to visit a nearby canyon trail. It has upland scrub, some limited riparian, and a pond at the beginning. I heard a lot more birds that I saw, but there were hummingbirds, and a California Thrasher in the scrub area, I heard some drumming in the trees in the riparian section, but was unable to locate the bird. Today there were no water birds at the pond, I have seen ducks and a great blue heron in the past. Activity 2: I looked at the species ebird lists for the 2 Arizona sites. The Roger Road site appears to have both shrubby/scrubby habitat types and some wetlands features, while the Mt. Lemmon site appeared to have more birds that like forested habitats.
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      rspayne
      Exploring 2 English e-bird hotspots At Down House (a home of Charles Darwin ) was described by Darwin as "being situated on rather high table-land, has somewhat of desolate air ... The charm of the place to me is that almost every field is intersected (as alas is our's) by one or more foot-paths— I never saw so many walks in any other country",  I used e-bird to screen just 2020 sightings and there were only 27 species seen by only 2 birders.  There were only birds of the fields and scattered forests.  No water birds of any kind.   The land has had a house for hundreds of years and there are enough old trees for a woodpecker population.  Several raptors were also observed and introduced species (ring necked pheasant) by the English gentry. Sevenoaks is a wildlife preserve which includes ponds (looks to be freshwater from map).  75 species were observed in the same 2020 period.  There were many water-birds including herons and ducks and geese.  There were most of the birds from the Down House as well. Similar to many of the observations from classmates in the course so far, the presence of water nearby enriches the variety of birds and their visibility.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Northstar56
      Hi, all. I live in the southeast corner of British Columbia, Canada. I walk daily near 2 ponds and a larger lake in a park. I've seen ducks, hawks and bald eagles at the ponds and the lake. However, the lake is the only place I've seen loons, flycatchers and sandpipers. The ponds are the only place I've seen Red-winged Blackbirds. (This difference in sitings could be my own limited ability to see birds that are there.)  I live across the road from a vacant grass field. I hear different bird songs than I do on my walk through the park. I think I can identify the song of the Western Meadowlark which is the only bird I've identified in the field.
    • Moya
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      moyakinnealey
      I looked at the bird sitings of Down House and Sevenoaks. I think Sevenoaks  must be an aquatic habitat  with a tidal pond and marsh/ wetlands as the birds sitings include  swimming birds, shore birds and sea birds. There bird sitings also included doves etc that are habitat sharers.  Down House  may be predominantly scrub-shrub (maybe a field) with a forested area. The sitings that made me think shrub-scrub were pheasants,  swallows, and larks.  I thought there was a forest because of the nuthatches, finches, jays and crows.
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      rspayne
      Exploring Bird Habitats Activty 1 visit 2 different habitats and look for differences In Estero FL (longer than usual due to COVID 19) and having hip issues so I went to my lanai (second story in a strip of big Live Oak trees and Palms) and  a spot on a nearby pond where I go all the time.  The rainy season has started and there is a rainy season puddle off my lanai making the sightings much more similar than they are in mid winter dry season. From lanai I only saw a blue jay in the tree but was slow with the camera and you all see them regularly.  Then a big bird flew in and landed in the puddle.  It was a little blue heron.  He stood still for a while and then dashed over to the edge of the puddle and speared a tree frog. He/she then went back to edge near the bushes and waited again.  A second one came but left quickly.  Based on the noises from the trees, most frogs have emerged from the pool and it is not yet full of this years crop of pollywogs and maturing frogs.P5250125 When I went over to the pond I saw redwing blackbirds and two interesting waterside sites.reddish and Ibis One was a reddish egret (new bird for me this week) seen above with an Ibis. Below was where 2 of the ibis that are usually there went.  Lok in the tree to their right and there was also a great blue heron in a place one might expect a raptor. He was about 40 feet above the mangrove and most smaller pines.   I had seen the ibis but missed the great blue with out the aid of my 300mm of telephoto. P5200098 I went to familiar places and saw unfamiliar sights.  Fun with birding..
    • Kristine
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      klolorenzo
      I visited an area with open grassy fields alongside wetlands surrounded by a little bit of young forest. We were able to see Great Egrets, a Green Heron, and many Canada Geese in the wetlands, swallows and warblers in the grassy areas and trees, as well tons of Red-winged Blackbirds everywhere. In contrast, I live in an urban area, and the birds I observe are unlikely to be egrets and herons, but the Red-winged Blackbirds seem to really like it here too!
    • Danya
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      dfurda
      Activity 1:  We visited two of our favorite birding spots over the weekend.  The first one is Duranceau Park & Griggs Reservoir and the second is Walnut Woods Metro Park.  Both are in Columbus, Ohio.  The first area is the best area we've found to spot warblers, Baltimore Orioles, and river birds such as the Great Blue Heron.  The second area has two different sections - one section is meadow and open fields with ponds and the second section has tall trees, both deciduous and pine.  We have found Field Sparrows, Red-wing Blackbirds, Tree Swallows and numerous woodpeckers here. By the way, I observed a Great Blue Heron do the same side leg and wing stretch.  I never noticed any bird do this before until this course.  We also are loving the Merlin app!  My husband finally broke down and bought a good pair of binoculars on Amazon so he is much more interested now in birding with me than before.  I am noticing birds so much more now than I ever did before. Activity 2:  Both the Roger Road location in Arizona and the Sevenoaks location near London feature pond birds whereas the Mt. Lemmon and Down House locations have forest birds (and especially at Mt. Lemmon raptors).  These last two locations have a greater diversity of birds, not just waterfowl. Below are three photos of birds from our weekend birding, including a Canada Warbler, Indigo Bunting, and Red-eyed Vireo. 1-IMG_5873 1-IMG_5917 1-IMG_5937
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      jluccaHR
      IMG_0209 We visited two local wooded trails (well known to us but now seen in a new light) with descriptions from our area Audubon birding map. The first site has a pond that attracts mallards, Wood Ducks, and (rarely) Green Herons. We didn't spot any ducks here although we had recently seen them at a National Wildlife Refuge Center (photo of mallard enclosed). One bonus of this hilly trail walk was noting we'd have a great high perch along this trail for viewing hawk migration in the fall. The second site visited was a trail alongside a creek that hosts large conifers and a shrubby understory used as habitat for migrant and wintering birds. We keep our Birding map in the car now---along with our binoculars!
    • Frankie
      Participant
      Chirps: 74
      FrankieBird
      Activity 1: I live in Maryland, and we have a very diverse habitat. In a commons by my house, there are 3 different habitats in small areas. It is a great birding area because of this diversity. First, there is a beautiful field bordering a forest, where we find robins, bluebirds, and sparrows. Then, as you get into the woods, we see warblers, thrushes, and woodpeckers. I recently spotted a black-throated green warbler on the edge of a field, which was a lifer for me. You then come out to a sizable creek, where warblers, sparrows, and shorebirds reside. There, I spotted an Osprey, which we have seen flying around our neighborhood. It’s amazing the birding hotspots you can find just mere blocks away from your home.EB3CA246-B56B-431D-BDFC-818E417CB5B9
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Mark Mcgeachie
      1.  Wooded  valleys with old growth eucalypts. Nesting hollows for Powerful Owls and Cockatoos. Smaller hollows for other parrots. Lower bushes and undergrowth provide cover for smaller birds such as honey eater species and Silver Eyes. River banks often occupied by ducks, gulls, herons etc. Grassy areas and open woodland have Magpies and parrots.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Mark Mcgeachie
      Activity 1.  The area I live in is a peninsula between the George’s and Wa
    • Annie
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      akiene
      Activity 1: I visited the Harris Neck National Wildlife Refuge this past Sunday. It's a big nesting spot for Wood Storks, and there were literally hundreds if not thousands of those guys. At Harris Neck, you can find a lot of species of coastal birds and waterfowl. One I was unfamiliar with was the Black-bellied Whistling Duck (pictured), and I used Merlin to identify them. While I didn't see one that day, Harris Neck is also home to the Painted Bunting - one of my favorite birds! Since the refuge consists of saltwater marsh, grassland, mixed deciduous woods, and cropland, this is a great spot to view a great variety of bird species. As I'm typing this, I'm at another location: my town's local high school (about 30 minutes from the refuge). I'm the librarian there, and I am currently sitting outside waiting for students to drop off their library books for the end of the year. Anyway, I'm facing an open athletic field and a few medium-sized trees and bushes. Besides the bunny that is hopping from bush cluster to bush cluster, there are about ten or so Boat-Tailed Grackles (thanks again to Merlin!) who appear to spend most of their day around this spot. While you would probably find these at Harris Neck also, they are unavoidably noticeable here. They are loud and extremely visible. Not shy at all. There is a also a mockingbird that drops by occasionally. At any rate, this place is definitely NOT conducive to species like Wood Storks or Painted Buntings. P5100014
    • Julian
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      FishIsTheWord
      I visited a certain suburban neighborhood that was recently constructed, and it is very hard to find birds in it. There aren't any mature trees or open natural grassy areas in the neighborhood for foraging. It's just planted sod with hardly any weeds, and the inhabitants use lawn chemicals all the time. It's very sad. However you can find some birds if you know where to look. In the one tree that is medium-sized, lots of House Sparrows chirp. They may be seen hopping on the sidewalk too. House Finches live nearby in the gutter of one of the cookie-cutter homes. If you look up in the sky for a while, you can spot soaring Turkey Vultures looking for road kill. All these birds are generalists, and they are able to make a home in the uninviting neighborhood. A little walk to the edge of the neighborhood reveals a small area of habitat that is easy to look past. Perhaps it is the only "eyesore" in the entire place, although a necessary one. It is the drainage ditch, and the water-loving plants that grow in the center are unable to be mowed down. On the electrical poles and from the cattails is the song of the Red-Winged Blackbird, which prefers a wetland habitat. The ditch is only big enough for one family group, but at least it's something.
      • Jay
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        PeanutJay
        Sigh... yes, a depressingly common "habitat" these days... the neighborhood was probably called something like, "Hidden Grove." Pretty hidden alright... Otherwise, great post -- and thanks for continuing to explore even in suburban wasteland!
    • Link
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Leafblade61
      Activity 1: The first place I went was my front yard, which is in a suburban area. There are a few big trees, and lots of wide open grassy yard. It is also near a busy road, and surrounded by houses and telephone poles. I House Sparrows and House Finches in the trees. I saw starlings poking around in the grass in my yard. I saw doves on the telephone poles. Next, I went to a nearby pond. Here, there is a large-ish body of water with a bridge over it. There's a rock barrier separating a secluded spot from the rest of the pond. There are a few smaller willows. Here, I see many Mallards and coots. I also see Barn Swallows catching bugs over the water and perching under the bridge. I see gulls and cormorants perching on the barrier.
    • Carole
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      blithewood
      I wonder if coastal dune scrub would fit under shrub habitats.  I find bluebirds, nuthatches, shrike, phoebes, kestrel, yellow-rumped warblers, gnatcatchers, tree swallows, mockingbirds, thrashers, towhees, dove, and a few sparrows if I'm lucky.
    • Sandra
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      sg333
      activity 2: Roger Road. Wetlands, mountains on both sides, parks, river, a large number of species, feeders of many varieties. Likely a large migration area due to the abundance of food. The many duck varieties would have leaves, reeds, small fish and crustaceans. Many tree feeders like the sparrows. Flowers for the hummingbirds. Park and open areas for hawks to hunt. Some flycatchers. Mt. Lemmon: Half the number of species as Roger Road. A great deal more larger birds; hawks hunting, woodpeckers who have a varied appetite for insects, nuts, sap and pine seeds. Being a mountain area there are likely a lot of evergreens; a perfect place for hawks and Ravens to sit and watch for rodents. A number of tree foragers like the sparrows. Colder temperatures and limited food sources, compared to Roger Road. Most of the species there likely are permanent/seasonal residents.apr11,2020 (6)glenApr2020 (4)
    • Sandra
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      sg333
      Activity 1: Surprising to me, by our large lake, there is not a lot of diversity. A lot of Canada Geese, some Mallards and other migrating ducks, Sandpipers, and a few birds in the large trees close by (American Goldfinch, European Starlings, ). In the marshes close by are Great Blue and Grey Herons, Mallards, Ruddy Ducks, Gadwall, American Coots, hybrid ducks, American Wigeon, sparrows, Osprey, and on and on. The marshes have so many food sources compared to the lake. I have seen the herons at the lakeshore, but not often. chichester (2)Chichester 2019 (11)
    • Jason
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Jason Stanley
      Activity 1: Two different habitats that I frequent when out birding are 1) a wooded and reedy riverbank, and 2) a wetland forest area. I definitely see different species in each, though there is an overlap. In the former, I see many water fowl (e.g., Mallards, Great Blue Herons, Double-Crested Cormorants, Greater Scaups, etc), as well as a large quantity of Red-Winged Blackbirds, Tree Swallows, and Song Sparrows. In the latter, I also see Red-Winged Blackbirds, but I rarely see any water fowl or Song Sparrows. Instead, I see American Robins, Common Grackles, sometimes White-Breasted Nuthatch, a few different species of woodpeckers, and a wider variety of warblers. Activity 2: I compared species at the two locations in Arizona. Roger Road seems to be a wetland. We see water fowl, a variety of sparrows, birds that forage in shallow water, like Great Egrets, and so on. By contrast, Mt. Lemmon seems to be, well, a mountain top. We see a larger variety of hawks, woodpeckers, and other birds that live in forests. I would guess it is a forested mountain trail.
    • Deborah
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      debcuk
      I thought Roger Road in Arizona was more aquatic in nature (like a lake or pond) since I found swimming birds.  Mount Lemmon in Arizona was more like a scrub shrub because there were chicken like birds, hummingbirds, fliers, raptors and owls.  In London at the Down House it seemed to be more urban with Pigeon and Dove, songbirds and fliers.  Seven Oaks London had an aquatic nature (maybe a lake) with swimming birds; ducks, seabirds; gulls, pigeons and doves and fliers.  This was hard a hard exercise!
    • Jay
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      PeanutJay
      Activity 1: This optional activity was a bit more challenging given widespread park closures, uncooperative weather, etc., but I found it very rewarding: different habitat, different birds! I guess I’d never really paid careful attention to it — and especially not while traversing among habitats. IMG_6020 Open habitats: I drove to a parking area along a road adjacent to cow pastures. Along the fence line, I spotted a number of Tree Swallows (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Tree_Swallow/) going in and out of nest boxes there and also zipping and darting through the air above the field. Leaving the parking area on foot, I saw a Barn Swallow (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Barn_Swallow/), who, I kid you not, flew out of a barn! It was possible to further distinguish him by his deeply forked tail and orange-brown underside. Soaring above the fields were a few Turkey Vultures (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Turkey_Vulture/), judging by the gray flight feathers. They were riding thermals and looking for, presumably, dead stuff. IMG_6018 Forested habitats: Following the trail led me first into a mature forest. I could hear a number of different songs and calls but, this being decidedly not my backyard, the sounds were unfamiliar to me. I found it frustrating to be very close to birds but not able to see any… until a brilliant red caught my eye, high in the canopy: Scarlet Tanager (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Scarlet_Tanager/) hunting (?) along a branch. Merlin helped me to quickly identify this bird and listening to the in-app sound clips made me realize that I’d been hearing him all along! In the more open, second-growth part of the forest, I saw a pair of familiar American Goldfinches (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/American_Goldfinch/) and a few less familiar Blue-gray Gnatcatchers (https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Blue-gray_Gnatcatcher/) — the latter identified by their long, mostly black tails with white edges (helpful, since they were flitting about quickly overhead and hardly paused!). Finally, there was a bird that I wasn't able to see clearly enough to identify (I only have a pair of 8x21s after all): it was sparrow-sized and appeared to be feeding from a bloom high in the treetops. I guess it's good to always have at least one mystery to ponder.
    • Manyu
      Participant
      Chirps: 42
      SManyu
      Activity 1 - Place 1 - My office in industrial area - I saw jungle babblers, sunbirds, treepie, red vented bulbuls, tailor bird, Indian robin, Brown rock chat, francolin, swifts, green bee eaters, house sparrows and of course pigeons. Place 2 - Man Sagar lake, Jaipur  - I saw Mallards, Egrets, little cormorant, herons and other water birds.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      kbarlow
      I am blessed with living on a farm where we have several habitats, including crop fields, pasture with hedgerows, an orchard, pine forest, mature hardwood forest, pond and lakeshore.  I watch Canada Geese, mallards, wood ducks, mergansers and grebes on the pond and lake.  Osprey and kingfishers also choose to fish there.  The Kingbirds that spend time catching insects in the pasture will often come skim the pond surface for water bugs, or to get a sip of water.  (I’m not sure what they are getting, I just see them swooping down to the pond’s surface.) Great Blue Herons also stalk around the shallow edges of the pond and lake and they hunt for fish. The hedgerows along the pasture are home to field sparrows, Gold Finches, and Purple House Finches.  We often see Meadowlarks and Mourning Doves in the pasture, along with Redwing Blackbirds, Cowbirds, and Starlings. Bluebirds and Kingbirds perch on the power line above the pasture searching for insects to catch.  In the orchard, I see Mockingbirds, Blue Jays, Cardinals, and sometime, Phoebes. The crop fields host a variety of birds, depending on the crop planted there.  Corn, soybeans, peanuts and cotton are the crops usually grown, rotated yearly.  Seagulls fill the field the days the fields are tilled, and for a couple days thereafter.  Tilling time is the only time I see Seagulls on our farm. Once the crops begin growing, the bird population in the field changes. Killdeer have been known to nest in the field between crops. The mature hardwood forest hosts Great-horned Owls, Wild Turkeys, and Pileated Woodpeckers.  Many small birds flit between trees and I struggle to identify them when I only get a brief glimpse. (this course is helping, as I am using Merlin, and a camera to capture pictures I can study)
    • Manyu
      Participant
      Chirps: 42
      SManyu
      Activity 1 - Lockdown has been lifted partially , 7 Am to 11 AM only, will try to go to lake Mansagar tomorrow. Activity 2 - Two spots in Arizona: Roger Road and Mt. Lemmon Belted Kingfisher,Mallard,Great Egret,Snowy Egret,Double-crested Cormorant,Green winged teal, double crested cormorant and wood duck these birds indicate that there is a lake/river at Roger raod.  This is the only difference that I can prove through the difference is the species , without looking at the terrain maps of these two places.  
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      glomdoc
      Activity 1: The land right around my home has both open field and trees/wooded areas so we have birds that one would expect in that habitat, but do not see water birds. When we ventured to a nature preserve nearby located on the Shenandoah river, we saw great blue herons nesting, plenty of Canada geese, and a bald eagle. When bicycling along the C&O Canal towpath we saw common loons and a green heron on the water in the canal.
    • Robyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      RobFork
      Activity 2: Roger Rd. vs. Mt. Lemmon in Tucson, AZ I know this area of Pima County well having lived there for over a decade.  Mt. Lemmon's peak is around 9,000 feet.  Switch-backing up the mountain, one begins in a lush riparian ecosystem called Sabino Canyon filled with seasonal waters from spring snow melt on the mountain.  Roger Road is in the arid, flat lands of the Sonoran Desert.  The Pima, who call themselves Tohono O'odham people, were early engineers channeling run off from the mountain and annual monsoon rains for agriculture whilst also utilizing desert native plans such as prickly pear cactus fruit and mesquite beans for flour.  These two location, as one would expect, are as geographically different as night and day--literally alpine forest vs. desert floor and the bird diversity or lack thereof is evidence of that.  Roger Rd. has no bird sightings yet for May on eBird and only a few bird sightings (2 doves, 1 vireo, 1 flycatcher) in April.  Contrast that with the bird diversity and abundance on Mt. Lemmon which had, in May so far, more than 10 each of:  yellow-eyed junco; house wren; violet-green swallow; stellar's jay; as well as a wide-array of other birds including robin, warblers, thrush, and hummingbird. Activity 1:  My neighborhood (Los Gatos, CA) vs. Los Gatos Creek/Vasona Lake My neighborhood has lots of both native (California Buckeye, Coast Live Oak, Redwood, Sycamore) and imported (Chinese Elm, Magnolia, etc.) and flowering bushes of lots of varieties (bottlebrush, oleander, etc.), so it attracts a wide-array of tree/shrub dwellers year round:  red tailed hawk; tree swallows; hummingbirds; wrens; oak titmouse; sparrows; etc.  At the end of my street is the entrance to the Los Gatos Creek trail.  The trail is fed bay Vasona Lake which is fed by the Lexington Resevoir in the hills.  The Creek is set about with willow, oak, and other native trees.  On the creek you'll find coots, mallards, egrets, herons, and Canada geese.
    • Diane
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      dianeshaw
      1.  Mowed acre field, north Florida: rose breasted grosbeak (immature male or female, migratory) ruby-throated hummingbird Carolina wren chickadee Adjacent Lobloly pine and sand pine forest: white eyed vireo cardinal Carolina wren whipporwill (evening)   2.  Roger Road: water/shore birds   Mount Lemmon: no water/shore birds
    • Marty
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      wavebird
      Activity 1 Our local pond has many species of birds. when walking around the pond we saw mallards, some with babies, Canadian geese, and we saw one white goose. downy woodpecker. We also saw a group of chimney swifts flying by. Our other habitat is our neighborhood. We saw European starlings - lots of them. Also we saw sparrows, robins, mourning doves, cardinals, turkey vultures and a flicker feeding on the ground.
    • Paula
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Pklazrus
      In my area I have a more suburban stretch with flowing trees and gardens, and also not too far away a boardwalk along and estuary.  In the former I see and hear many types of sparrows, woodpeckers, robins, cardinals, blue jays, mourning doves, starlingss and red wing blackbirds.  These species also appear in the estuary area but join ring and herring gulls and mallard ducks, cormorants and fish crows.   Comparing Roger Road vs Mt Lemmon, we have a wetland or marsh area at Roger Rd vs a Moutainous region wt Mt Lemmon with both open and wooded areas. Looking at Down House and Seven oaks we have two areas in 'settled' zones. The former in the midst of rural fields with trees and hedges dividing them while Seven Oaks seems to be a small wood near a village.  
    • Rosemary
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      stagero
      Along the Cuyahoga River will have area's where the Green Heron, Great Blue Heron search for food along the river in more shallow areas and then there are Mallards diving in the deeper areas.   Further away from river are a pair of Bald Eagles nesting.   In the forest area's I see Nuthatches, Brown Creepers, Pileated Woodpeckers and downy woodpeckers. On Roger Road I noticed more waterfowl and at Mt. Lemmon more smaller song birds.   At Down house I noticed more medium sized birds along with gulls from a nearby shore and at Sevenoaks I notices lots of waterfowl and birds that nest near ponds.
      • Katie
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        karboga3
        Yay! Another Cuyahoga River area person! It has been amazing to see the river's transformation just within the last 7 years or so when they got rid of a few more dams, only two more left now! I've noticed more Kingfishers and the Bald Eagles.
    • Ryan
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      NaniAndrew
      Activity 1 Yesterday I went to the nearby nature reserve called the Marshlands Conservancy, and there are primarily two different habitats.  At the beginning of the trail, it's heavily forested; however, the trees gradually ease off until you arrive at a large marshy wetlands.  In the forested area, I saw many different songbirds, including Robins, Blue Jays, Tufted Titmouse, Downy Woodpecker, and Red Bellied Woodpecker, as well as some Wild Turkey.  When we got to the wetlands, I started seeing less of these species, and started seeing Great Egrets, Osprey, Red Winged Blackbirds, Mallards, and Herring Gulls.  And this is all in the same square half mile!  It just goes to show how many different species can live in very different habitats, in a very small space.
    • Deanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      14deenray
      I live in a forest area, there are many different habitats just looking out my window, an old forest, a newer forest, grassy area, a field, and a short distance away is a marshy area. There's several Bald Eagles around, and an abundance of variety.  This is my favorite time of year, as the migrant birds are coming, as well as old familiars that have hung out all winter. In the photo attached, you can see the various habitats just outside my front window. I am interested in finding out more about Sand Cranes, as in this picture you can see a field, they make a lot of noise, then swoop in and hang out in the field. Why? For many years there were only 2 of them, this spring upon their return there's a 3rd. Seems to be the same pair year after year, same pattern. Lots of noise by the marshy area, then they land in the field and hang out there awhile.turkey with young
    • Ray
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      ray_lidstone
      1. Just by looking at my backyard through my bedroom window I can see several types of birds, including finches and juncos at our feeder, ring-necked and black ducks in the pond at the edge of my yard, and starlings and robins searching for food in the open patches of grass that have started to show through the snow. When I visited a local park earlier I saw ruby-crowned kinglets, chickadees, a red-breasted nuthatch and a hairy woodpecker that was vigorously drumming on a birch tree.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      hallmarkf
      1. Near my house is a small lake with a trail around it, where I walk frequently. The lake is man-made. Near the dam end, one frequently sees tree swallows, Canada Geese swimming, and Osprey overhead. At the other end is a wooded area where the stream feeds the lake, there are cardinals, robins, sparrows, etc. Along the sides, and in between, one frequently sees mallards, red-winged blackbirds, and a great blue heron. 2.Mt Lemmon and Down House would seem to be more wooded, while Roger Road and Sevenoaks would seem to have a body of water present.
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