Viewing 54 reply threads
    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      Reflect on the three teaching practices UC Davis recommends for teachers to use to maximize youth learning with citizen science. Which of these practices do you wish to model in your teachings and how?
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Raz K
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      raznrol
      I really like the Taking Ownership of Data Quality... I am a hands on learner and I get excited when others interests are sparked by hands on learning. To see the lightbulb go off, their curiosity peaked, or joy of a question being understood. I also like to let others find out for themselves rather than just giving the answers. I like to give a spoken lesson out in nature, ask the group for their take or input, then to enhance memory, give a short written (on paper) quiz to see what they have retained. We then go over the answer together and save in a progressive journal to refer back to. Throughout the semester I usually throw out a question or two as they come back up in nature.
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      akleinsorge
      I want to work on positioning youth as people who do science.  I work with a group of kiddos who needs to feel empowered to make changes in the world.  They come from homes where they are often just along for the ride.  By making them feel like experts and teaching them they can make a difference  I hope to get their buy-in.  I want them to see themselves as people whos actions matter and who have important roles to fill.  Instead of them talking about science class I want to understand that they are involved in being scientists.
    • Ron
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      ronbrohm
      • Positioning youth as people who do science, framing the work globally and locally and attending to the unexpected are all key educator practices that I wish to model my citizen science programs and teachings.  I want our local students and participating citizens to take ownership and meaningful roles and to be real citizen scientist making an impact and contributing locally but making a global impact also.
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Banjojanie
      I was delighted to read about research that supports students, as citizen scientists, connecting their investigation data with an environmental agency. This an idea I strongly support. When learning is relevant, meaningful, and engaging students will feel successful and value their findings. Best of all- they gain ownership of their learning!
    • Laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      PVAbobcats
      Framing the work globally and locally is of tremendous value to all of us today, as many young people lack a connection and understanding of how their food, clothing, and residence come to be available to them. This will be my first year teaching science in a classroom; I previously have only taught through informal educational venues. In my previous life making connections was the greatest contribution I could give and after teaching math last year in a classroom setting I started to see where the structure is and why there may be teachers skipping the connections; tying learning back to our local communities and the world will benefit us all.
    • Beverly
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      bschieman
      The practice I strive to model in my teachings, whatever the subject, is to attend to the unexpected.  I am always showing my students how I am learning right alongside them, even with texts I have taught many times, because each time you approach any text, or any learning situation, the outcome and responses will vary according to the readers or observers.  What is created between the observed and the observer is the learning, and this is the thing that is always unexpected, and why teaching never gets old!
    • David Lockett
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      DavidLockett
      The UC Davis teaching practices are practical and concise. Global connections are always amazing way to connect students with projects that are relevant and in turn provide a solid connection. Making that connection can definitely reinforce community education and discovery.
    • Pam
      Participant
      Chirps: 33
      Pam Hosimer
      I find the “position youth as people who do science” to be the practice I would like to model in my teaching. The example given of students “helping scientists” as the opposite of this concept was clear and easy to understand. In the classroom I have seen my students react with great responsibility and seriousness when I have honestly shared information and expectations with them about a project or activity, especially when I add that I’ll be learning with them. We all roll up our sleeves and get busy with the task at hand. It is so rewarding to work with them and discover new information together. I’ve also become an expert at admitting I have made a mistake or I was wrong so that they can feel comfortable doing the same. I’m not saying that is easy to do, it’s not. But it is a lot better than trying to balance up there on that pedestal. No one is perfect! Plus it is impossible to teach or learn if your mind is closed because you know everything. As a person who does science if I can make mistakes, be a learner in our classroom and keep an open mind, why can’t they?
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      CoachGoody17
      In my Global Environmental Issues course, the students do a rendition of the One Square meter project to take a closer look at biodiversity.  However, we only report out findings with each other.  I would love to try to incorporate more of the CS projects into this project.  I am currently working on a community project with High School and Middle School students in both my school as well as inner city schools which will connect food systems, bees, and environmental education. One of the best things I can do right now in making that a success, is allowing the programs to grow organically with nature and LET GO of the control. What great advice!   I am taking this course so that creating, monitoring, and continuing CS programs at my school can happen. As I previously mentioned, I sometimes struggle with fitting it in, or keeping it going, or even getting it started. I think that the pandemic is going to allow me more freedom with my curriculum this year, so I am looking forward to stepping back and getting students more involved in "real" science.
    • S
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Ladyhawk85
      Probably the one I could be better at is: frame the work locally and globally. My students have presented their field study results locally: school and community but it's the Citizen Science piece that I need to get better at. This will have more of an impact on my students.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      Lingibbs63
      I relate most to attending the unexpected in my work as an informal outdoor educator. Although I will offer a program focused on a particular topic for youth and families outside, the multitude of environmental stimuli outdoors usually leads to all sorts of questions, discoveries and investigations. I find that I will connect with different learners over different interests, and I love experiencing and bonding with others' enthusiasm about something we encounter on the trail. We stop and investigate things together as co-learners, and it becomes a joyous, inspiring memory with learning applications that extend beyond the particular outing.  I find that I do need to improve my question-framing so as to better position participants as scientists rather than being the source of knowledge, and that I need to make sure and discuss potential actions they can take in their communities more explicitly with my groups.
      • Pam
        Participant
        Chirps: 33
        Pam Hosimer
        Linda, I agree that attending the unexpected connects with different learners. I was working in the garden with three of my students and one of them found an earthworm. The other two screamed! We then spent 15 minutes looking for more worms (we were supposed to be planting something…), discussing what it felt like to hold them in your hand, learning how to pick them up and being careful to not harm them since they were beneficial to our garden’s health. All three students were experts in worm-handling after that investigative experience. Next time I’ll have a better framework for that discussion after what I have learned here.
    • Deanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      DeannaW
      I love the local to global connections as that on is one I emphasized our watershed studies. We make a point to cover the larger watershed through the 3 years of science that I have them. We start with the school yard and wetland, connect it to the stream across the street (field trip). We continue exploring the bigger watershed with 3 field trips to areas along the Potomac River. Eventually make it to the Chesapeake Bay. We try to do water quality testing along the way. I need to help them make more connections with their data-- comparing it to the buoy data, comparing it more from site to site and analyzing it form year to year. They will then take on more of the scientist role besides just collecting the data and using instruments. Expecting the unexpected seems to always happen so I am comfortable learning about things along with the students. My focus will be to maximize the students' role as scientists.
    • Nikki
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      mswallacexth
      The practices mentioned by UC Davis will help me create more contextual experiences for my students as it relates to their own environment. The  ability to develop expertise, contribute data, make meaning, and share the work and take action will allow for students to take ownership of their projects and its importance to their community.
    • Cara
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      carafern
      The three teaching practices are so concise and understandable. I think that I hope to model further "attend to the unexpected" and realize that "failure" or even no data, can be just as important of a result as a successful expedition. I think that teaching and focusing on this mindset is important as an educator, because it puts value back into the process of citizen science.
    • Allison
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      allisonmurphy
      Because I teach programs in a park, I believe that I often engage students with complex systems and also connect them to their local environment. However, I need to work harder to model the first practice, "position youth as people who do science." With a limited time for programs, I don't often engage the kids as scientists as much as just help them experience science and nature. I need to do a better job of facilitating inquiry and data collection instead of directly telling or leading them to what I'm trying to teach.
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Lingibbs63
        Me, too, Allison! I am usually so excited about the topic that it's hard for me to not just take the lead, but we can do it!
      • Pam
        Participant
        Chirps: 33
        Pam Hosimer
        Allison, I need to do more of the data collection too! That would be a good goal to strive for.
    • Sylvia
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Sylvia_Qualls
      The three teaching practices that UC Davis recommends just seem like common sense to me. If you are working with students and they are the learners then they should be doing the "science", and taking ownership of it. However, I would say it is more meaningful for students to drive the project or investigation out of their own observations or interests rather than just solely having a teacher assign a project/investigation to them. When I was a kid my favorite game was to role play that I was Jacques Cousteau  in my own submarine, in charge of my own crew and out there making observations of sea creatures. This was a very elaborate imaginative role play game that I engaged in pretty much every day in my room. It is fun to direct your own learning and find your own project so it makes complete sense to allow the children to take that on. This is also why I prefer to generate investigations out of nature walks and organic experiences. I have tried it the other way, being teacher directed and it just ends up with me having to back pedal so much content language that puts me in the "knowledge holder" role. That is not really my thing. I am comfortable with messy and opportune so I am totally down for attending to the unexpected. I think the teacher lingo is " teachable moments", and just go with it. Thumbs up on that. I definitely frame our learning locally, and certainly connect it to national issues, but I think I probably need to look at how help my students make better connections between "local" and "global" connections/interdependence both in terms of what is common across the world and what impacts others around the globe more directly.
      • laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        Vagabondgirl
        Hi Sylvia. You and I are cut from the cloth. I used to pretend to be David Suzuki and report "from the field" for CBC's "The Nature of Things". I wholeheartedly agree with you that following student interest is central to success. I also do a lot of local focus... local farmers visiting and sharing in the creation of our Learning Garden or our province's woodlot association helping us plant butternut trees or taking part in a shoreline cleanup event. I have been reflecting on the balance of teacher-led investigations (such as these formal citizen science programs) and student-interest led inquiry projects (Like you, I'm comfortable with "letting go", noise and mess!) I will play around with this balance again this year with FeederWatch as part of my overall outdoor program to see what student-interest it inspires. I will continue to tweak my approach here and there as FeederWatch is implemented in a manner that doesn't impact quality of data. We'll see how it goes! Laurie
    • laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Vagabondgirl
      IMG_5454 Instead of selecting one key practice, I considered the 3 Youth/3 Instructor best practices and how they can inform my own practice and philosophy of teaching. These best practices already play a strong role in my own teaching philosophy and daily approach to teaching young children. I suppose my "favourite" would be co-learning with my students. I learn new things every single day and share my amazement with them.
    • Julia
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      j.hardy
      I would like to work to include all three practices, but most importantly the "position youth as people who do science". I feel that with building a CS project that my biggest hurdle is getting students engaged and so if I can get them engaged and excited about participating in a CS project that then, I can build more easily into students not only making the connections locally as they will see it as they do the project but then the referrals to reference materials that would help with making the global connections. Finally the "attend the unexpected", I feel that while yes students may feel frustrated at times because they did not get the results they expected, that this will help them to learn to be flexible and that it is okay to re-evaluate our expectations and come to new conclusions.
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      jenna132
      I would like to include all three teaching practices in my teaching, but the one that aligns most closely with my passion is the idea of using CS to affect change within our communities.  During the weeks that my fifth grade students were engaged in virtual learning, we took part in a virtual field trip with UNC Wilmington's MarineQuest Science Lab and learned about plastic trash and its affects on sea turtles.  Kids were encouraged to pick up trash within their own communities.  I'm really passionate about the topic of marine trash but since my school is in Central New York, learning about marine trash doesn't seem to fit into our community.  I liked, however, how the program linked marine trash into picking up trash wherever you are.  We talked about waterway connectedness and the great likelihood that much plastic trash ends up in our waterway and can affect marine species.  I live in the Finger Lakes region and we could certainly tie something with water quality, trash, and marine species as a meaningful learning experience. I would love to find a CS program that would allow me to tie this passion into my classroom and community in a meaningful way.
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      Curious621
      Position youth as people who do science- my students complete independent research projects.  We start in August and they present their findings at our school fair in February.  We have great expectations for them and although there is some whining and drama along the way by late February the students realize that the process made them grow. Frame the work globally and locally- In doing their projects they gather peer-reviewed journal articles.  I teach them how to properly cite their references and explain that in their conclusions they should explain how their (local) research fits in with the (global) studies they cited.  I try to emphasize that each contribution has an impact and the whole is greater than the sum of its parts. Attend to the unexpected- At times their clearly designed projects don't operate as planned.  Seedlings do not germinate or snow days limit access to human subjects or the results are completely contrary to their hypotheses.  That is all OK!  Modifications can be made and students need to be flexible in doing so.  This is good life lesson as well- thing won't always go as planned and it's not the end of the world.    
    • Robin
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Salthouser
      I believe all three teaching practices are important to incorporate when learning with citizen science. 1. Positioning youth as people who do science is important to engage the students with the CS project. If you don't see yourself as someone who can be involved with posing science related questions, participating in the inquiry process, and making discoveries then why would you want to be involved other than having to do an assignment. I would explain how the students work will have an impact on the CS project. I would find a video recordings of scientists on YouTube (SciStarter) explaining how crowd sourced data has helped advance their research. 2. Attend to the unexpected sets the stage for making discoveries, and dealing with the changes that may cause participants to rethink their hypothesis or approach to gathering data. I think this also fits into the change in attitude that experiencing "failure" is a good experience, and provides opportunity to learn to make improvements/changes for future endeavors. 3. Frame the work locally and globally provides relevance to the activity. My science learning was normally centered around rote activities, and didn't give me a long term reason to be engaged. As someone who has been involved in environmental issue activism, I find it very difficult to get people engaged why we need to save open spaces for biodiversity, or support alternative energy to help reduce global warming. If people are connected to the local and global issues with science research, we may not have the political divides on local and global environmental issues. I love the idea of presenting the information to family, and local policy makers to make suggestions or ask for change. It's important to let children know that citizens have the ability to shape change through knowledge and  community participation.
    • Sara
      Participant
      Chirps: 30
      SaraPi
      Real Science in the Palm of Your Hand is such a great resource to remind us that we as educators, are facilitors of the learning process. When the students are involved from the start of the process through the very end, the lesson's impact has the ability to grow beyond the orignial intent. Teaching students to see themselves as scientist is the most important practice for my role as an educator. In order for students to practice science in an authentic way, they HAVE to see themselves as scientist, they HAVE to engage as a scientist. In doing so they gain skills and confidence that will help motivate them to communicate and engage locally (in their school community) and well beyond. Attend to the unexpected is a practice that speaks to the beauty of discovery - taking time to observe/explore/discuss the unexpected adds layers to the entire process. New discoveries lead to new questions and new investigations!
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 41
      Acorn Woodpecker
      The UC Davis article has given me insights on what I have seen working with youth and volunteers on CS projects over the years.  The three teaching practices are on target.  When youth can envision themselves as scientists,  this makes science meaningful, attainable and friendly. The actions of taking on the roles of scientists by collecting reliable  data and gaining knowledge of something that is happening in the environment can really motivate youth.  This direct experience if framed correctly can lead to an interest in science that otherwise may not happen in traditional settings.   CS  also leads to a deeper understand of the environment.  All environmental educator want to improve environmental literacy.  As the article states when youth know about the environment locally and see their interactions with the environment can be positive, then this life choice and be a life long practice which can impact the globally environment.  This knowledge is powerful which is part of the second practice. The third practice of expecting the unexpected can lead to rich teaching moments. These times of serendipity can be influential and memorable.  They are lessons that we don't seek, but when experienced, they stay with us.  They are like golden nuggets and really part of what teachers can encounter outside of the control classroom setting.  It is wonderful that researchers are provide data to support CS.  I think it is important to model all of these teaching practices.
    • Phanh
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      phanhnguyen
      I wish to practice more all 3 of these points in my teachings, especially the "framing the work globally and locally". Because what we do individually can have effects on many other things, putting things in perspective will help students being more responsible. On the flip side, showing them that there are things we can do at the local level that help solve global issues will be very empowering, help them to be pro-active as well as to learn beyond reciting given knowledge. To model this in my teaching, for every activity we have in the garden, I would have a part maybe called "Seeing the big picture" and ask students to discuss together how the activity can have affects on other living things beyond our immediate surrounding. Also, we can discuss about how these activities can help address global issues that they are learning in class, or are in the news these days (air pollution is a big issue often talked about in our city, for example).
    • Jessica
      Participant
      Chirps: 27
      jmckenna
      Position you as people who do science is the first key teaching practice. Students need to understand that they can be scientists and contribute to scientific findings at a young age. Giving students a purpose makes them feel more involved and allows them to begin to learn about scientific processes in an authentic way.   The second key practice is framing the work globally and locally. In my opinion, this is one of the most important practices. It gives students knowledge about how what we are doing is not only impacting what is going on in our community but how it it is connected to the state, country or even the word. Letting students know that things we do in one place can have a larger effect on our global community as a whole is very important. If they have this understanding when they are young, they may make more responsible decisions as adults. This is the area where I most need to improve and incorporate more in my classes with my students. In grade one, students will be completing a Marvelous Marine Animals science unit. In this unit, students learn about our local marine ecosystems and what we can do to contribute to keeping them healthy. This is an area where I think I can connect with the global picture regarding pollution and how what we put in our water locally can travel and impact species in other places.   The third practice is attend to the unexpected. It is important for our students to understand we are not experts at all we do and we are learning with them. Taking time to explore wonderings together and discover things shows students your enthusiasm and that you can be a lifelong learner.
      • Sara
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        SaraPi
        I love that in first grade your students are discovering how we are a global community! Have you looked into the NOAA marine debris tracker app? You could setup your own team and collect trash around the school yard as a way to engage your students in a project that helps keep waterways clean. The website has a map showing data about the trash collected (pics), location, and collector so it'd be a great way for your class to see how their effort helps the entire world!
      • Laura
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Curious621

        @Sara This sounds fun, even for high school students!  I will look into it!

    • ej
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      tejer!
      Position youth as people who do science - engaging students in decision-making and trouble-shooting processes! Frame the work globally & locally - looking for interconnections/crossover which is easy for something like butterfly migration or groups like  lab of O that monitor nationally or beyond. But this is still possible with anything: doing water monitoring? - see if there's citizen science or community groups working on water quality downstream, visit their website or contact. Monitoring bats in central PA? Look up other bat monitoring groups in NM or NZ! What species of bats are they seeing, what are environmental/habitat/disease issues they're facing, what monitoring issues have they run into? Embrace the unexpected - discuss process vs product. If product/results aren't what you expected/robust/usable, have students review the process - what could be changed if the project were done again? Design solutions!      However,  don't invite the unexpected - be sure to have the groundwork in place to proceed. I'm embarrassed to admit the first time I did the Great Backyard Bird Count (with my own kids who were very excited about it after visiting friends with a very active feeder), we got a feeder but I kept forgetting to get bird seed. And when I did remember I forgot the local Agway closed at 5. And then there was a snowstorm. And so forth. I finally got some the day before the 4 day start counted. We got the feeder filled and hung the 1st morning. And....not a single bird all four days. It can take them several weeks to discover  a new feeder. Oops!
    • Kinta High School
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      KintaZoology
      Since I am already using Citizen Science in the classroom, here is what I do- 1.  Students develop science understanding by doing science. This includes gaining new information and using the data. 2.  Students become the scientist. 3.  As students become aware that they have to share their findings, then there is increase ownership of actions and understanding in order to explain.
    • Jackie
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      JackieScott
      The three concepts are to develop an understanding of environmental science content and inquiry practices, self identify as experts, and allowing students to create change whether it be large or small in their own lives or in their community. For me where I struggle is encouraging students to self identify as experts. Confidence in their knowledge of the subject and confidence in being able to find the right resources. I recently heard Neil degrasse Tyson speak about giving our students the tools to find the right resources and that as educators providing them opportunities to explore and distinguish between good and poor resources.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      amyeroche1
      The three key teacher practices are: position youth as people who do science, frame work globally and locally and attend to the unexpected.  Without knowing it, I think I kind of attend to the three practices, but I definitely want to be more intentional about it now.  I was really fascinated by the term ESA, or Environmental Science Agency.  I had never heard that term before and I'd like to think some more about that.  I looked at the citation and want to do some of my own inquiry around ESA now.  Great article!
    • Antoinette
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      ahatzop
      Great article!  Having our own garden of plants native to our area have given our students the power to "do science", explore, observe and have ownership.  I always say "the more we go out, the more we will discover, investigate, and learn."  We get a lot of surprises on our 7 acres.  The students are naturally excited to share, and these three practices allow us to teach across disciplines.  We need to start a citizen science project right from the beginning of school to maximize learning.  They can extend/compare to what they observe in their own yards.  We can do the ladybug, butterfly and bird projects.  We have iPads, and the children have learned how to take photographs.   Our students also use nature journals and take great pride in their drawings and observations.  Doing the citizen science projects will elevate their learning and make it even more meaningful.
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 41
        Acorn Woodpecker
        Thank you for embracing these CS at your site.  It sounds like you have a lot of resources and opportunities for your students.  Kudos to you.
    • Alana
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      C.cyaneus
      I believe that all three practises are important for different reasons. Having the students know that they are doing science and that their findings are actually getting used, gives them a wonderful sense of empowerment. It's amazing what kids can come up with if we give them the independence. Framing the work globally and locally helps them see how they can make a difference as an individual. Attending to the unexpected can be a challenging mindset to get across, but an important one to learn early on. I really like the philosophy of "there is no right answer" and "we don't know what we will find", to me, that is the excitement of science!
    • Alaina
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      AlainaYoung
      I definitely already use the first practice, as I frequently have participants contribute data to larger projects and emphasize why their work is so important., framing with "You guys are going to help scientists by giving them information". I have also worked to connect the local with the global - as a land trust, we are conserving land locally, but we are contributing to the conservation of an important migratory corridor that spans the US. Canada, and the Great Lakes system. I try to enforce that in a lot of my programming. I think that I really need to work on the final principle of attending to the unexpected. I want to be less rigid in my programs and expected outcomes, and instead be better at adapting to nature (as it is always changing and surprising us!)
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Lingibbs63
        I love that STR programs contribute so much to the larger understanding of the river ecosystem and beyond, Alaina. I feel like we (Tug Hill Tomorrow) struggle with this mostly because the organization is really in its infancy as far as school programs. But we do really well with attending to the unexpected. We should get together and exchange ideas!
    • Edna
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      wvteacher87
      The three best practices for teachers include: position youth as people who do science, frame the work globally and locally, and attend to the unexpected.  I liked the idea mentioned during Tuesday's webinar in connecting to scientists via Skype, Zoom or other methods.  With students interacting with scientists and understanding the importance of their jobs, I think students will be excited to develop expertise and join the ranks.  I plan on using the SciGirls videos to increase student awareness of jobs available in science and to discuss interests.  The two Citizen Science projects I would like to start at my elementary school are Project Bird Feeder and eBird.  Both of those projects would help students go from local perspective to a more global perspective.  As far as attending to the unexpected, I think we allow learning to steer us in various directions.  Therefore, I don't think I can describe this until after I see the many paths our learning may take.
    • Kristen Mae
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      kmaecarpenter
      After I introduce myself to the students and before I take them out into the field, I always say to them "today you are the scientist." I think this encourages them to take pride in their observations. It's not just another assignment, it's their personal observations that they can use to make their own conclusions. At the end of the day we discuss what we learned about being a scientist, how did we make observations and use those to answer questions. Before they leave I remind them that when they are out investigating the world, they are always scientists. Them being a scientist does not end when they get back on the bus. I would like to find ways to incorporate citizen science lessons into my organization's current field studies. So that the students can take what they've learned during the day with me and continue it after they have returned back to their school and even their homes.
      • Alana
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        C.cyaneus
        What a great way to get the kids involved and empowered! I love that "today you are the scientist", I can imagine what a positive effect it has on them!
    • Kathy Nerdy Birdies
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      kbalman
      I would like to improve on and model the  "Attend to the Unexpected" teaching practice for the students. I want the students to know that failing is okay and part of the learning process. I would like to use the unexpected failures they encounter as teachable moments and be able to encourage them to continue pressing on.
      • Edna
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        wvteacher87
        I am responding to your post because this is the one that I thought would be harder to discuss.  I agree with you about unexpected results are part of the learning process.  Sometimes, that can lead us to a deeper understanding of what we are trying to understand.  I looked at this practice as a multitude of paths that students or I may not foresee until we are in the midst of our investigation.  Therefore, details would be more elaborate as we pursue other avenues.
    • Veronica
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      vhorton
      I would like to model for my students the ability to see themselves as "people who do science" not just as students who have to learn science. Many of the students I teach feel a since of defeat before they even get started with certain academic subjects like reading and writing. However, I have seen that glimmer in their eyes when science and discovery enter the picture. Science topics (animals, the planets, plants, etc ) provide interest for my students and are a entry point for getting students to be more vested in their own learning. If I can show students that they " belong to the club" so to speak they will begin to feel more comfortable taking risks as well as feeling that they have something important to contribute to any group, project, or discussion. I also want to extend that self confidence to the extent that students develop themselves as experts who are in charge and take ownership of their learning and do so with a vested attitude.
      • Nini
        Participant
        Chirps: 32
        Ninich
        As someone who supports students in the Special Ed population, your comment about students feeling a sense of defeat resonated with me.  How interesting that science can awaken so much in a student and contribute to a drive to learn that may transcend their struggles with reading or writing.  The power of observation in these investigations can also lead to highlight other strengths for the struggling reader/writer who has an amazing ability to represent their observations by drawing.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      maroberts64
      Reflection:
      • Positioning Youth as People Who Do Science - This helps students to build upon their natural curiosity to become scientists. It's a way of learning that builds intrinsic value to observe, show data, and share conclusions with their community.
      • Attend to the Unexpected - Teachers need to take the unexpected and use them as teachable moments, not hurdles but rather slight detours that address related topics. Young scientists should understand that this is part of the process.
      • Frame the Work Locally and Globally - Having students work framed in their community gives them a purpose beyond the grade. They are scientists providing information for the good of their school, neighborhood, or world. Learning that they can make a difference in the world is a valuable lesson to learn early.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      maroberts64
      I feel that all of these practices are important to model, but my primary practice to model would be Positioning Youth as People Who Do Science. Teaching students to be scientists who gain the confidence to observe, question, collect data, and come to conclusions to share with others - these are all skills that can be used and grown throughout a lifetime. Students have the curiosity and can come up with the questions. Once they wear the hat of a scientist, it will never come off. Nurtured, it will continue to grow, giving students the power of their own learning.
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 41
        Acorn Woodpecker
        Nice outline and goal.  I like the idea of wearing a scientist's hat and nurturing growth of your students.   Great way to place them in the driver's seat.
    • Kandis
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Kandis+1
      The three teaching practices that UC Davis recommends are a great framework to teaching citizen science.  Positioning Youth as people who do Science as the first suggestion needs to be taught at an early age, youth need to see themselves as able to do science, make personal connections to science, find the interconnectedness of the community in which they live.  Getting youth engaged in science at a young age will allow them to see that they can in fact do science, and it is fun.  “Think Globally and Act Locally,” a quote one of my colleagues uses frequently.  Framing the Work Globally and Locally, stepping up the open-ended critical questions with how this data they are collecting can be used, why is it important, how can they make a difference locally that will play a larger role.  This gives youth an understanding on how they can make a difference, doing science for the larger good.  Allowing them to take responsibility for their community, creating understandings on how things work together to create the beautiful world in which we live. Finally, Attend to the Unexpected, as the last recommendation to teaching science allows youth to take on more of an inquiry based approach to learning.  Giving students time to ask questions and research why something may have happened during their research.  This allows youth to take charge of their learning, finding out things that matter to them, making more of a personal connection. The three teaching practices show the stepping stones to inquiry-based learning using three steps instead of four as mentioned in The Many Levels of Inquiry, by Heather Banchi and Randy Bell.   I see, Positioning Youth as People who do Science as aligning with the confirmation and structured inquiry levels mentioned by Banchi and Bell, where youth are given the question, procedure and possibly the conclusion.  Work Globally and Locally as a guided inquiry approach where youth are allowed time to think about how their findings effect the world in which we live.  Finally, Attend to the Unexpected as open inquiry allowing students to ask questions and have time to research their “I wonder statements.”
    • Smriti
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Smriti Safaya
      I'm completely biased about how awesome UC Davis is: I did my undergrad in Geology there, and almost chose to do my PhD in citizen science there too! Ok, back to the question. I wish to model all of them because they are equally important. 1. Positioning Youth As People Who Do Science: Even though I don't teach science, I feel like 'doing science' is actually about building the capacity for inquiry and the confidence to investigate a phenomenon.  I apply this in geography (in topics like environmental sustainability, urban environments, quality of life, etc.).  This also instills a sense of independence and open-mindedness, because CS project answers/conclusions aren't often "google-able" and it takes some critical and creative thinking to find answers.  These are transferable skills of value across disciplines, and students of any age can appreciate this mindset.  I would do this more by creating opportunities for mini-investigations throughout my topics based on their own issues of interest. 2. Frame the World Locally and Globally:  I would actually put the 'local' first, and then the 'global' because so often in international school education (where I've taught) we look beyond our own neighbourhoods and consider the big, often-used case-studies that have caught media attention, but forget to recognize opportunities closer to home.  This can then expand on opportunities for experiential learning, place-based learning, project or challenge-based learning addressing issues that are arguably even more relevant to students because it's about their place/school/neighborhood/culture, etc.  If projects involve addressing local issues, then this is where some tangible impact can be measured (measuring it at a global scale is rather difficult in the time frames of schools years/terms/lessons).  But this isn't to say that recognizing one's place in the global context is not as important - it is very important.  The key lesson about how one's actions impacts others is one of the most important values to teach in a variety of contexts and disciplines.  This applies in social sciences as well as the natural sciences. 3. Attend to the Unexpected: Being ready for the unknown and being comfortable in that space allows for honest reflection, motivated inquiry and open-ended discussions.  It is often hard to build time for these in regular lessons because of the need to cover curriculum (external examination pressure, etc.) though I do often go down these types of tangents to see how far the students want to go, but I find that field trips and field experiences provide easier opportunities for this.  Otherwise, in order to try to 'make time', I would try to use online tools to garner ideas and discussions that stemmed from unusual discoveries in the classroom.  It takes skills to recognize when these 'teachable moments' can be grasped by teachers and students alike, so I would like to support my students more in being able to follow a line of thinking, with peer feedback, modelling and reflective discussions.
    • Annette
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      AnnetteSteele
      Youth As People Who Do Science -  I think if all teachers took their lessons from lecturing students on science content to  people who do science, there would be a much different look  in a lot of science classrooms. When students know the work they are completing is meaningful and relevant, they are much more engaged and motivated to learn. Frame the Work Globally & Locally - Once again, work that is meaningful and relevant to the learner will lead to  students who are intrinsically motivated to learn and  participate in activities and projects that do lead to greater knowledge and possibly environmental changes.  Students need to know that their work is valued and important. Attend to the Unexpected - some of the most meaningful lessons are taught when the unexpected takes place. Student misconceptions can be discussed and  the power of an educator to say, " I do not know why, how can we find out," can be a powerful learning experience for students. I believe the educator needs to be a facilitator of knowledge rather than the source.  Students need to recognize that they must play an active role in their learning. That their questions, gathering of data and conclusion have merit and are valued.
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      MIFRANKO88
      In my high school biology class - I would like to model the practice “frame the work globally and locally.” Since I do not live in the immediate community of my school, it will take some time and research in order to figure out what would be the best application to the local environment. An idea that came to mind is, habitat destruction due to development or how development leads to an increase of travel in the immediate community -- and how these things can affect the environmental quality. To connect to the global aspect, we could use various current events to establish a connection between the student’s CS investigation to other areas in the globe. We do an environmental short film study throughout the year with the hope of exposing students to various things happening in the US and across the globe that we don't necessarily have time to fully explore throughout the school year. We have four main themes: species restoration, everything water, pollution and climate change. I think we could use the film study to make connections to a citizen science project. If students gain an understanding about how our environment is not a closed system, that everything is connected, can help students see the importance in caring about what is happening to your local environment and how it affects nearby environments as well as implications for environments around world.
    • Dianne
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      dhaley1
      As I reflect on the Educators Key Practices recommended by UC Davis to maximize youth learning, I am intrigued by all three.  Position Youth As People Who Do Science, Frame the Work Globally & Locally, and Attend to the Unexpected, each have merit and each have a place as a best practice. I enjoy the thought of even furthering developing my students as scientists.  As sixth graders this year will be the first time they will have science every day for the entire year.   In elementary school it is rotated with social studies every other day for half the year. In the beginning of the year, I introduce science to my sixth graders as 'Who is a scientist?' 'What makes a scientist?' 'What does a scientist look like?'.  I further discuss, 'Am I a scientist?' and 'Are you a scientist?'.  They leave knowing scientists are all around us and they could be scientists, as well.  I feel that CS will feed into this and support my teaching. My students, our students, are the promise of tomorrow.  I constantly tell my students, they are here to fix our world problems.  I love the idea of framing the work globally and locally, and how minor changes can effect a much bigger result both positively and potentially, negatively. Their ideas and suggestions are the solutions of tomorrow. When running a lab, one thinks they know how the data should look, but there are surprises.  For me, they are always welcomed. I tell my students, I do not know all and they are here to discover and teach me! So I welcome the unexpected, that is joy of science! I think I model all three of these practices, but I hope to further develop my students as people who do science.  I strongly believe that all people are scientists.  If you recycle, sign a petition for clean water, or rescue a turtle stuck in the middle of the road, you are a scientist, you find value in our Earth!  I feel that as we develop, we are all citizens of science and the sooner we empower our youth as leaders in science, the better our Earth will be!
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      michelle_quezada
      Of the three teaching practices that are recommended in Real Science in the palm of your hand the one I will model in my teaching is "position youth as people who do science". Creating various roles within groups and providing students with leadership opportunities is one way the authors shared could assist in this. I have found that many students are not confident about themselves and this can be seen in their resistance to engage in new academic challenges. Engaging in a citizen science project where they learn to identify the quality of the data and get to learn from each other could be a great opportunity for them to gain confidence and see themselves as active participants in science. The second practice of framing the work globally and locally helps affirm a student's identity as a person who does science. If they are answering a question and providing some type of feedback on the local level it can affirm a belief that they are scientists.
      • Dianne
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        dhaley1
        Michelle,  I agree!  I love the idea of empowering our students as scientists and looking to them for solutions.  Thanks for sharing, Dianne
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      alrichardson
      While each of the three teaching practices recommended by UC Davis are important I chose to focus on “positioning youth as people who do science.”  I teach 1st grade and some children in my class have lacked confidence, motivation, and perseverance when working on STEM and science experiments and investigations.  To begin the school year I think it’s important to teach children about what a scientist is, what they do, and how they help our world.  Through the use of literature, examples from our STEMscopes science curriculum, and by inviting scientists from the community into the classroom students would gain some valuable insight before our units or citizen science projects begin.   Through our science investigations and STEM activities students write or draw their ideas and findings and communicate with their classmates.  It tends to stop there when it doesn’t have to.  In the article, “Real Science in the Palm of Your Hand” it stated that we want children to be capable investigators alongside scientists.  We want them to understand and see that they are indeed scientist’s helpers!  Even though they are six or seven years old…they can still be a scientist!  Through citizen science projects my students would learn that the observations and investigations that they do at school and throughout the community are helping real scientists around the country.  These projects provide authentic learning opportunities for students and teaches them that the data they collect and the observations that they make will be shared with a scientist or organization outside of our school district.  I think that through incorporating citizen science into the classroom alongside our district’s curriculum, students will be more motivated to learn, gain confidence, work cooperatively with their classmates, and will understand that the work they are doing is being shared and used by a real scientist.  What a powerful thing for a young mind to experience!
      • Dianne
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        dhaley1
        Amy,   I agree, as well!  Our students are the scientists of tomorrow!  I love the idea of empowering them to change our world for the better.  Thanks for sharing, Dianne
      • Mark
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        maroberts64
        I totally agree, and I think students struggle to be creative because they are used to giving a specific answer to a specific question. The skills gained through becoming student scientists will help in all subjects because they are more confident in their abilities. :)
    • Johanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      jdelwood
      The UC Davis article, “Real Science in the Palm of Your Hand”, provided three important practices for teachers to consider as they begin planning citizen science projects for their students.  As I read the article, I thought it was important that this information was included in the article.  Much of what we read in citizen science is focused on the projects and how to engage students in the projects.  I appreciated these paragraphs dedicated to the practice of teachers as they incorporate citizen science projects in their classes. The first practice is for teachers to conduct the projects in a way that students recognize themselves as people who do science.  I thought this was a great practice to encourage in teachers.  I often remind my students that anyone can practice science.  All they need is an inquisitive mind and the initiative to take time to observe what is happening around them.  Citizen science projects will instill these practices in students. In the second practice, we are encouraged as teachers to frame the citizen science project on a local and global scale.  With the variety of databases available to teachers today for citizen science projects this should not be an issue.  When students see that their data is being added into a global database for scientists around the world to use in their research projects, this will make the classroom project a real science project for the students.  Being able to share locally and to have the attention of school and community leaders will give value to the project for the students.  To see their community, act based on the work of the students will give the students encouragement to continue citizen science projects. For the third practice encouraged for teachers, I was reminded of some of my own experiences in field projects with students.  I like the way the authors described this in saying, “attend to the unexpected by paying attention to surprises that emerge.”  I refer to these as teachable moments.  I have had a few of them with my students.  As a teacher, we must always be aware of what is happening around us when we are with our students, this is especially true when we take our students outside the four walls of the classroom.  There is much to be seen and experienced in outdoor projects and we must be ready to answer questions or explain the unexpected to our students. I value all these practices and have varying degrees of experience with incorporating all of them in projects with my students.  I believe the first practice of helping students to recognize themselves as people who do science is the practice that I will focus on for citizen science projects.  If this is a trait that is strongly instilled in students, then it will hopefully stay with them throughout their lives, at least to some degree.  This will be planting a seed of appreciation and care for natural surroundings in young people whose lives will take many different directions.
    • Vanessa
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      CPAWS-Education
      I believe that work locally and globally is important. Not only does it allow for clear cross-curricular connections, but it also provides them with an understanding of the community. They are scientists that are a part of a broader scientific community they can participate in. We will do this by exploring some of the maps/data which are submitted from global citizen scientists. Understand how the data which we collect can make changes. Perhaps provide examples of how citizen science has created structural changes in the past.
    • Elisabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      evhartman
      Of the three, the practice that best suits and supports the work we are doing is to frame the work globally and locally. Many children are naturally drawn to animals, but for some children, particularly those in urban areas, the only animals they may identify with are domestics such as dogs and cats, or zoo animals. We think it is very important to nurture any and all respect for all animals, and recognize and relay there are things we do or use that affect wildlife in other countries or continents and that habitat loss is a global issue. However, knowledge of the wildlife in their own backyard is fundamental to them understanding and being good stewards of our local natural environment and how to best support it wherever they live.
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LauraYoung
      I wish to model all of these practices in my teaching, but I especially want to focus on positioning youth as people who do science. I work with newcomer students who have little to no previous formal education, and my colleagues and I have found that developing a "growth mindset" around school-related work can be especially challenging for these students. By positioning my students as people who do science, and helping them become experts and active participants in citizen science, I hope to make my students feel proud, confident, and empowered. I think it's also important to make their science learning more authentic. I hope to model this in my teaching by finding real citizen science projects for my students to participate in, helping them see their roles as important and real, and supporting them by giving them the skills to become experts.
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        alrichardson
        Hi Laura, Thank you for bringing in the concept of "growth mindset."  Many of my students lack the motivation and desire to keep trying and to improve on things...especially when related to school work.  I agree with you that we can make our students feel proud and confident through the modeling that we do and by providing science lessons and investigations that are authentic.  I also feel that citizen science projects help students feel that their role is truly real!  The data they collect is going somewhere other than their school and this can become powerful in helping gain that pride and motivation.  Your response was well said!  Thank you!
    • Taylor
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      TSimon95
      All three of the teaching practices that UC David recommends are important, but the one that stood out to me the most was "position youth as people who do science". This really resonates with me as an educator, because I have witnessed students feeling powerless or incapable of accomplishing different subject matter, and I think that citizen-science is really great for empowering students. By helping students take on meaningful roles in the citizen-science projects, they will value their contributions more and value themselves as well. I want to focus on modelling this teaching practice because I want my students to feel empowered and work on ways they want to contribute to their local and global community. One way I think I can incorporate this more is by taking my students outside more, and providing them with more opportunities to collect data and create their own procedures for doing so. In this sense it would be more student-lead than me just telling them exactly what to do.
      • Sara
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        SaraPi
        Totally agree with you Taylor, it's so important for students to feel capable, successful and empowered. Reminding them they ARE scientists and providing opportunities for them to build their confidence is critical in order for them to feel ready to present their findings to others and to develop a sense of community and responsibility.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      NRGregory
      1."Positioning youth as people who do science" seems integral but needs to be acknowledged and intentional as seen from the 2 questions asked of students in the article. How the CS project is approached can directly effect how engaged the students are in the collection of the data and the quality of the data. 2. "Frame the work both globally and locally" highlights how the students are helping make a difference in their world.  I think we, as teachers, can get caught up in our local project and all the good it will do and not share the global nature of the science or visa versa!  I like how the researchers make this a point to be attended to. 3. " Attend to the unexpected" is an essential part of environmental education, especially with young children.  Our job is to encourage the sense of wonder and love of science and the natural world- what better way than to give time and attention to new findings, mistakes and being upstaged by nature! As a whole, I'd like to model all three practices in each of my encounters with students.  In subsequent encounters, I will try to focus more on giving the students more control of the data collecting processes and engaging in the science and engineering practices offered through CS projects. This will  reinforce their role as true scientists and encourage them to view themselves in this role not just at school but in their broader experiences outside school.
    • Carlos Eduardo
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      jumabita
      Youth Share Findings  with Outside Audiences (Youth Key Practices) and PositionYouths as People Who Do Science (Eduacator Key Practices). The first is through the contribution including university degree theses that have to do with the subject, that is to say to somehow involve the school with a little more advanced research such as that of the university, in this way it will be a feedback where Both parties will benefit. It will allow children to approach and learn a bit about the structure of a more elaborate work or investigation, such as a university thesis, and in the case of the University, it will allow them to meet the observational optician who will undoubtedly be supportive and contribute material. additional for the support of the investigations. In the second point and continuing a little with the previous idea, it will position the children as researchers and not only as observers, since they will be providing first-hand very useful material for hypothesis formulation and research.
    • Liz
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      lsiepker
      1. "Youth as people who do science." I thought it was important in how you frame this to students when beginning a citizen science (CS) project. The example used was a question that you could ask students: Could a scientist use this information? By the way this question is asked, gives students a sense of responsibility in the quality of the data they collect if they know someone else is going to use it. 2. "Frame the work globally and locally." Connecting science to a students sense of place is so important here. Depending on the socioeconomic status of students you serve, might mean that some students have not had experiences beyond a local geographic area. Therefore, it's critical to focus locally to help motivate students and give them a sense of ownership. For me personally, I do not reside in the area in which I grew up but compared to my students who are from here, I've been astonished about what they don't know of their "home." I'm constantly trying to bridge that gap and I think CS projects will help. 3. "Attend to the unexpected." This can be such a powerful teaching moment especially when doing CS in the natural environment when anything goes. It appears that many CS projects are conducted outdoors anyways, but if not, an outdoor learning environment would be critical for this to be able to happen.
      • Michelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        michelle_quezada
        I find that some of my students also have a very limited experience geographically. I agree that including a local context to the research would increase their sense of ownership. This could also bring them to an understanding of the role their communities have in the larger context.
    • Andrew
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      acatt1920
      I believe that all three of these teaching practices are important. The second, framing the work globally and locally, is essential. At my school, we have established or restored sustainable wildlife habitat around our campus. This transformation is giving students the opportunity to study animals and insect up close and have a hand in their ensuring the survival and conservation of these habitats and creatures. We've focused our efforts on Monarch Butterflies and Ladybugs, establishing two large gardens specifically designed to be habitat for them. Through the efforts of our students, we were able to get these areas certified as Schoolyard Habitats and Monarch Waystations. We've also raised a couple dozen or so Monarchs and Black Swallowtails and released them into the habitats. This allows students the opportunity to watch the lifecycle process up close and learn how to care for the creatures need (food, water, shelter, etc.). Throughout the project, students learned the larger global connection as well.
      • Elisabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 23
        evhartman
        The Monarch project is a great way to connect local and global work with migration, they are recognizable and relatable for many children and when the children have the opportunity up close and personal to learn what resources the Monarchs need for survival, I think it helps connect the idea that need these resources where they migrate to as well.
Viewing 54 reply threads