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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      What are your thoughts on measuring proportion in the field? Is this technique helping you capture your subjects more accurately? Do you find that proportion is easier to measure on some subjects as compared to others?
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      mararbizu
      image
    • Blanca
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      BlancaManzanilla
      Thank you, Liz. Always had trouble with Proportion but this technique helps a lot. I have even sketched my GS which I've been wanting to do. Proportions
    • Marta
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      MartaOli
      Getting proportions right1_Marta_Dec1_2020Getting proportions right_Marta_Dec1_2020 I went outside, at first, to practice measuring proportions using my pencil. It worked, helping me to balance the pond size and configuration, as well as the bench. Then I practiced indoor, using a still from the video provided here. While outdoor, I think didn't notice negative space as much as drawing the second time, indoors. I realize these are techniques I must keep on practicing. The negative space helped me a lot, while drawing the "Pink Lady's Slipper" flower.
    • Candy
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Candy.schrank
      20201127_091950
      • Candy
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        Candy.schrank
        The eagle was sitting in this tree for quite a while, just moving the head to different positions.  Because it was gloomy and the bird about 200 feet away, I took a photo, zoomed in and brightened it to better see the side wings, feet, etc.
      • Candy
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        Candy.schrank

        @Candy DSC02678

    • May
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      May-A-A
      flamingoDrawing the negative space to show the flamingo
    • May
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      May-A-A
      Measuring proportions helps at looking at far away object to depict the proportions of each element on a 2D surface. Below are two drawings, the first measuring inside of space. The second measuring an outside scene. Both drawings where measured using the pencil. insideoutside
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      jenneve58
      This technique has definitely brought my sketches to the next level. Living, moving animals are definitely harder than landscapes. Using photos and video that you can loop I find is very helpful. Below is a drawing I did do a toad I found in the garden when digging the last of the potatoes. It was certainly an exercise in proportion but also negative space as the garden soil made such a contrast to the toad. I worked off a photo that I took. I am pleased and surprised how well it turned out using all the techniques I have learned so far in this class. Thank you!image
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      amykarst
      I think my flamingo was better using the negative space than if I had tried to draw it as "the bird"flamingo
    • Janice
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      JaniceMcDll
      I practiced a gesture drawing of horses in the neighbouring field, and realized that after they moved on, and some of horses looked liked elongated sausages, that this would have been the perfect application for measuring a head, and then using that measurement as a tool to refine my gesture drawings. Not having done that, all I know is that my ‘sausage horses’ aren’t in proportion, but I don’t have the info to correct them. Great tip for using the tools at hand!
    • Caroline
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      benjaminboies
      IMG_7937 Measuring felt overwhelming at first but it removed complexity once completed as I could focus on the details and not worry about missing a part of feeder because of a measuring mistake. This took me close to an hour and not one bird showed up! Measuring feels easier with scenes that aren't as cluttered. I realized after watching the video that the bench example was straight forward, symmetrical, easy to understand to get the point across. Finding something in nature that works the same way isn't that easy. I walked around for a good 10 minutes before finding the proper sit spot+view combo. I'm learning so much. This is awesome.
    • Bridget
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      rimuridge
      This was really helpful. I found that I underestimated the relative sizing each time. It was helpful to move away from what I thought the subject should look like to paying more attention to what I was actually observing. IMG_20200920_145006
    • Lumi
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      lumifox
      It was hard, really hard! But after a while, the drawing began to look like I wanted it to. I was drawing my dog, Lumi, the Leonburger, of whom I am obsessed with, (I’m using her name for this) and found she was harder to capture realistically. (I’m more of a cartoon artist) However, she is from a bit of a lazy breed, so that made her easier to sketch because she moved so slow. I don’t always use basic shapes to correct form, but I feel I should more, it is definitely rewarding. Lumi’s head is so large it’s almost disproportionate, which was hard to draw, but after I tweaked my drawing a lot, I found myself with a drawing I want to hang up.imageimage
    • Kimmai
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      KimmaiNunnery
      IMG_4084 I find that objects that dont move like plants, landscapes, seashells are much easier to measure proportions than moving object like animals and insects which can be much more challenging !
    • Emilie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      PanamaM
      I was surprised to see how accurate the flamingo came out.  I liked using negative space.IMG_7919
    • Adella
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      adellamarie
      I noticed it was difficult to measure a large subject and fit is on a smaller page in my journaling book.  It is important to measure correctly because it will throw off the balance of the sketch although you can adjust. Some of my subjects were more difficult I think, because of the size & depth.   A flat subject was easier.
    • Adella
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      adellamarie
      2020-08-28 - Proportion & Negative Drawing #22020-08-28 - Proportion & Negative Drawing #12020-08-28 - Proportion & Negative Drawing #3
    • diana
      Participant
      Chirps: 49
      ittybittyart
      8D70081B-954C-4C45-8B52-EF69A38331D0E09674A0-6F3B-4306-9C70-14DFD961FAA5 It Was Difficult! Too hot to find any animals out so got gestures and proportions from soccer field — using human dimensions. Fortunately for me, a killdeer and some urban birds showed up on sign fixtures so I captured some wildlife too. I used videos for gesture inspiration of funny owls & also negative space around the theee.
      • diana
        Participant
        Chirps: 49
        ittybittyart
        5CA5F60B-C808-4DCA-BC35-53B420952B3F 4AE5BB70-5749-4586-B1A7-04B6CF13116F Sketching - it gets in the bloodstream... From a random encounter with a killdeer in the parking lot to be sketched to digging up videos for behaviors / gesture observation, ind thing leads to another. Doesn’t it? Clearly the first sketches with proportion & negative spaces in mind for gestures helped to get a better sense of the killdeer’s body and nest relative to its’ chicks.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      patofvta
      20200815_093617 Proportion 120200815_093638 2 Proportions I have been pleased with the measuring technique and have selected two places for my sit spots. I have a water fountain and the birds like to visit but are not sure about me.  So over a period of time I have been sketching them or the fountain when I was lacking birds.  I also starting taking photos when I can catch them so I could get the various angles and markings on the birds.  One afternoon I sat at the beach and was open to any and all subjects.  I think birds are a challenge because they move so much and in so many directions, children are tricky too.  I have found that proportion is relative to other subjects, so mostly I am just working on getting familiar so I can see and capture the different perspectives.  This is actually leading me into an idea for a composition with the fountain.  I just need to have more birds bathing and splashing.  I might get a journal page yet. Pat
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 30
      susangreta
      proportion)_mullein sketch
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        susangreta
        I don't know what happened to my text! I am trying to focus and use the measuring techniques - good for my attention now during the Covid crises, as I am having some ADD! This little mullein plant attracted me as it is a tiny replica of larger mulleins in the neighborhood. I think it's a mullein? In any case I am having trouble delineating one part of the plant from the next as they all seem to flow together in the actual plant. I tried to keep the drawing life-sized to work on the proportion. Difficult. Will now try to add more shading and color to be clearer with what part is what.
      • diana
        Participant
        Chirps: 49
        ittybittyart
        Great job
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      JFeldkamp
      I took a prior class that covered drawing proportions, and I hated that one too. I find it very difficult and don't really know what I am doing. But, of course, proportion is important, or drawings look lopsided and odd. I guess I will have to keep at it. I also was introduced to negative space not too long ago. It didn't make sense then, but this time, it made much more sense and is quite interesting. I tried a drawing in the field as Liz did in this lesson. Using the measuring technique, or at least trying to, I think that I got the proportion of the leaves more accurate. They became larger and larger the closer that they got to the ground. My first attempts were too small. Thank goodness for erasers. I was interested to observe the negative space between the leaves. But I didn't have much time to develop the drawing. Proportion and Negative Space
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Peckalot
      Did a sketch had time and finished it. Notes were added after to the photo. I need the practiceIMG_0387
    • Scott
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      ScottA010
      DSCF1614i i went to the Cornell Botanical Gardens after dinner, I had a long day at work so I decided I should have a relaxing night of sketching and took my camera with me also so I could sketch more thoroughly in the near future from a photograph. I have noticed a few things about the Globe Amaranth when I was sketching it that in my mind it was very delicate flower with so much detail , the flower looked like it was alone by it's self which drew me to sketch it and being a soft color of purple. The Iris was in a different part of the gardens and love them it was a beautiful purple with yellow; some are probably thinking my favorite color is Purple, not so but it's beautiful you can guess if you want on my favorite color......
    • Scott
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      ScottA010
      DSCF1613DSCF1612I started drawing one and it was way off and I decided instead of getting frustrated I decided to draw a second one which came out better. I find that I am better at actually drawing positive space shapes than negative, but I am getting used to drawing negative space with practice
      • diana
        Participant
        Chirps: 49
        ittybittyart
        👍🏼👍🏼👍🏼
    • اليازية
      Participant
      Chirps: 27
      Alyazia
      IMG_6683 Away from the birds, I measured the proportion of my camera and its tele-lens. I used a pencil (I prefer ink though). The technique as a technique is very useful. It is very helpful for still-life and a subject that isn't moving much - not for fast birds. With time and practice the sight is being trained to measure without this technique; I rarely use it because I'm not that patient :/ - I'm here to train myself , I'll give it a try with future drawing. -
    • Isabel
      Participant
      Chirps: 30
      IsabelTroyo
      • I think that this technique was very useful to get better proportions. IMG_20200601_180245IMG_20200601_180145
      • diana
        Participant
        Chirps: 49
        ittybittyart
        Love these
      • Christine
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        seadahl80

        @diana I like the way you included your proportions with your sketches.

    • Frances
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      2616Etna
      I started with something that I thought I would succeed at.   In my backyard, on a hot day, I worked on drawing a pot on the end of a bench.   The bench is very weathered, with many subtle colors and two patches of lichen.   I tried.  I am not happy with the way the shadow cast by the pot came out.  I have not finished with this.  This is not an ambitious attempt.  The lines are simple.  I thought beginning with a subject with easy-to-measure proportions would be best. IMG_1302
    • Leonora
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      noniebird
      5A4BD373-3C7B-4153-8693-C85714628957C2A56CBF-A1CB-40BA-853F-1D882143E3D9
      • Adrienne
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        mystierodan
        I absolutely love the aesthetic of this journal page! Beautiful lizard and the different writing styles are wonderful!
    • Colleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 43
      CBMac7
      FAACE27E-5993-4CDC-9A96-B10423109269I definitely like using my writing utensil as a measuring tool while drawing to help with proportion & accuracy. I had forgotten about using that & negative space in finding the correct proportion & accuracy in my drawings. Also I have a 6 inch ruler too. Yes, I have found that proportion is easier on landscapes, animals that aren’t moving quickly, and a single animal (than a group of animals), & some simple plants. I have noticed that my proportion was badly off which was leading to not be accurate with my drawings. Big improvement.
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird
        Hi, Colleen. Your little wren is perfect! Can just imagine how beautiful it will be when you add color. Yes, I agree. This measuring technique has helped me also. 👍🏻
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7

        @Leonora Thanks Leonora. I’m pretty pleased with that wren too. Not sure 🤔 how ready I will be to get some colors on it though. That’s where it really gets muddy. Looking forward to seeing how to add some colors to it. By the way you lizard 🦎 looks really sharp and I am blown away by the drawings that you do.

    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Great Kills Park
      Enjoyed this exercise, proportions for me is something I will need to keep practicing and reminding myself to check-
    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Great Kills Park
      measuring proportion - sketching front garden
    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Great Kills Park
      nature sketch - measuring negative space and proportion
    • Stefania
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Stefiex22
      It is easier to draw a stable animals and to the measurements. This technique has enabled me to make a better capture of the subject and manage my inconsistency about drawing a body. I like what Lis has done with the pencil and I have tried to repeat the same  with the animals. I found interesting to draw both the penguin and the owl. By watching Lisa's video, i have recalled the importance of negative space and I am planning to draw more flowers to get the habit of proportions.
    • Jenny
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Jenny
      It took a lot of fiddling to get the proportions right.  I lost it at the bottom where the legs meet the perch.  I find I need to pause quite often as I am working to remind myself to use the proportion tools. IMG_4948
      • ANDREA
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        barnea2
        great work! Sometimes I "cheat" and move the branch closer if I need to shorten the leg.
    • Matt
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      mgoldberg
      IMG_5996 This drawing is of a pool in a stream, and there was a log laying in the stream close the near side. I was tempted to draw the log very close, with about a third of the visible river between me and the log. However using the proportion techniques, it was clear that in my frame, only about of a third of what I could see of the stream lay beyond the log, and two thirds on my side of the log. I think this observation helped me to capture the depth of the landscape a little more accurately.
    • Giuliana
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      giulianacpferrari
      It was quite challenging to draw the negative space, because I kept wanting to draw the shape of the flamingo and had to check myself to return to the negative space. But on and all was an interesting exercise WhatsApp Image 2020-04-28 at 16.23.53
    • Avery
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      boxturtlestudio
      I was not sure how this would go but sometimes forcing yourself to draw moving animals can result in a favorite sketch. I tried to capture the different poses of the vultures. I sat on a convient log and drew for 45 min. I also took photos.  Later, I fixed hastily drawn sections. I tried to use measuring to get the proportions right. I looked at negative spaces. After a while, my hand/eye coordination improved. I colored my flamingo negative shape 20200428_11355520200428_091246drawing to jazz it up.
    • Suzy
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      slyttle
      Great tip! I knew my proportions was something I had to work on. I used it in this activity and feel like it really helped. I used a photograph so it was easy not to have a moving object. I tried it later on a squirrel and that guy moved way to fast!! Porportions
    • Montana
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      mvasquezgrinnell
      I think with more practice I will definitely be able to have better proportion in the field. It's a good guideline to make sure everything is more accurate and looks like a more professional drawing. Also, when the drawing is better I find it to be less distracting with reviewing the notes and information written down in the observation. image0
    • Koen
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Nahtur
      I challenged (and tortured!) myself with making a drawing of a picture of a Broad bellied darter  I made last year. The complexity of its body with  its very specific wing shapes and delicate maze pattern was overwhelming.  In addition to getting the right proportions, finding the right mutual angles between  the wings, the body and the reed  was a particular challenge. Concentrating on negative spaces between those parts fortunately guided me through this minefield…Darter
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Wow, incredible dragonfly. You should torture yourself more often, ha ha.
      • Sherl
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        sarose
        That is fantastic! Great job.
      • diana
        Participant
        Chirps: 49
        ittybittyart
        💚
    • Leah
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      imchickadee
      I think that this technique is really helping me get the right proportions depending on what I'm drawing. This technique is helping me capture my subjects more accurately. I think it is always good to have this trick in your sleeve because it can really help make your drawing much better. For me, it is easier to measure proportion on objects that are tall and thin because my wrist feels weird being sideways and it is a bit awkward trying to measure things from side to side with you pencil. Measuring slanted angles on the other hand is much more difficult for me, and I hope to improve.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Pamfooh2
      I was not able to go outside but I have this orchard in bloom.  Negative space was really helpful.Screen Shot 2020-03-25 at 5.05.13 PM
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      David Santos
      Unable to go outside mainly because weather conditions, I looked up to old pictures and did the task sugested. Proportions with this technique is quite accurate, and even if is not by the milimeter, gives realism to the drawing. I tried with different objects and for me all objects are good for it, although choosing where one takes the measure can help a lot. My flower is a "starish" shape but not in a frontal view and before all I took the proportions of the petals, stem and leaves. All the drawing went from there. 90576239_669246667239467_4044502352533651456_n 90682575_230932261370713_6298164902125109248_n 90442242_2635297563264635_5150319920013115392_n
    • Student Birder
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      trudy10024
      I redid my marsh wren using proportion techniques and also did the snail shell drawing.  then I drew a towhee based on a photo a friend took.  I worked on proportion and had to draw it several times.  Then i decided to add the rust color of the towhee and it looks a little strange when i scanned it.  Anyway using my pencil or fingers for measuring proportion is great.  I tried it when i walked in the park just to get an idea of size,  and I'll try it an outside drawing next.  Snail shellsMarsh wrentowhee
    • Betty
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Bee Kay
      The negative space and proportional measurement practices are more difficult.  I've used the arms length measurements before but wasn't sure what I was looking for when I did it.  I used that process on drawing the barn owl from a photo I took last month at a Sportsman's Show we went to in the area.  One of the locals is a birds of prey rehabilitator and she comes to many events near where I live and I was able to get some good shots of a barn owl as she walked with it near me. He was absolutely beautiful.  The negative space practice was pretty easy for me, I enjoyed this lesson a lot, it was lots of fun.Nature Journal_neg_space2Barn Owl_great swamp~2Barn Owl_Great Swamp
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Cool owl drawing, you really captured it!
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        susangreta

        @Avery Beautiful portrait of the owl!

    • Juan
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Juan Jo
      Is very useful because help you to have another perspective of things. Yes. Yes because all is perspective. image1 (1)
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Lovely rose, you really captured the bending petals well. Leaves are nice too.
    • joyce
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      BlueJz
      image
    • Curt & Jeanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      heuersthree
      I had forgotten that proportion trick. I know I used it a long time ago. Thanks for refreshing my memory.
    • Gail
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Gcoffeywriter
      I found using the measuring proportion technique very effective and gives me a great tool to make sure my illustration are more accurate and proportionally correct.   Queen Anne's Lace
      • joyce
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        BlueJz
        Very nice. I like the way you captured the light petals.
    • Chris
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      HeartBirds
      I call this, “Ok, you can look now”  learning the proportions trick helped me a lot to get close to the shape I was drawing  4646DAD1-03C4-47E0-A58F-9D1C60E686A256C5BF7C-12CC-4C8C-9F9D-35C5836870C8E3772A6F-9D97-48AD-96C1-1A8412A3BF5E
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        I love your cat and your drawings.
    • Heidi
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      HeidiTas
      I used the proportion technique to draw two marsupials that were outside my tent at a recent campsite in Northern Tasmania.  I used the length of the head as my initial measurement.  It made me realize that the Tasmanian Pademelon is a very round animal!  It also has a proportionally larger head to body size, which might be because this was a very young animal, but the Bennett's Wallaby was an adult.  The negative shapes helped to draw the legs more accurately than I ever have before!  I live in Tasmania, so have tried to draw these species a few times before but have greatly improved with these techniques.Measuring Proportions
    • BJORN
      Participant
      Chirps: 40
      suzukiawd13
      20200215_200123-1-120200214_164549-1-1Houseplant, old x-mas tree. free-style sketches.
    • Christine N.
      Participant
      Chirps: 38
      cnykwest
      The tools of negative space and proportion (measuring), I believe are going to make my drawings much better.
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      jalexaphotography
      The proportion trick made a difference to my sketches by eye. It helps rough the image in a bit more accurately so that it looked more like the subject. I loved that simply using a pencil and marking along the way is the only tool you need. Proportion is easier to measure when there are distinct parts of the subject.
    • Maggie
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      maggiewuts
      Before this study I thought I was seeing correctly but the measuring technique proved I wasn't!  This was a great exercise that really helped me.  porportion study
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      hollysnuts
      Using a hand to close around your better eye [or have a small, packable telescope] instead of simply squinting for a your first, immediate view of your field object; or use one piece of paper you stash in the back of your journal with its center cut for you previously with a square or small round you can squint through.
    • LeslieAnne
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      lasanford
      43BD1FF1-8E23-4DFC-9B6E-604A28CDADC8Measuring proportion and using negative space were very helpful in making the drawing more accurate. Because it is still very wet and cold here, I drew from a photograph of a flower I had seen in a Maine forest. Measuring proportion seems to be very useful for drawing parts of plants and animals and for getting their positions more accurate in their settings. I’m still pretty inexperienced in sketching and drawing, so I’m not really sure yet where these techniques would be more or less helpful, but I’m excited to keep practicing and learning.FEB9EAA3-AE06-44BB-8E79-18BE7DCD2E97
    • Jenn
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Jfreeda
      Using the negative space and measuring is very helpful.  I know this is a good way to help gather information for identifying birds etc. so it was great to see how to apply this to sketching.  Appreciating the surrounding area really helped keep my sketch in proportion.  Thank goodness for erasers!
    • Paul
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      pbieraugel
      This proportion thing is irritating - BECAUSE IT WORKS - and I'm usually too lazy to do it. But when I do it makes my drawings render more accurately. I did a freeze frame of those Red Foxes from the last lesson's video and tried the "number of heads" method and stuff looked better. It helped me realize the slender length of the parent fox versus the shorter, tighter form of the  youth fox. I'm buying into measuring proportion!  I also used some negative space to capture some of the interaction between the two animals. I like the way the instructor asks me to "be gentle" with myself and also to just go for it. Helpful. I've destroyed a few pages of my book but also have some that I'm proud of! I got this course as a birthday gift and it's one of the best I've ever received!
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      nancyjleonard
      Measuring proportion is a real help.  I always try to visually use the head of a bird as the guide, but the additional use of the pencil as the ruler really helps.  Thinking about negative space was very helpful with drawing the feathers.IMG-0187
    • Seth
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      sfb28806
      mushroomsLittle Sam Knob The lessons on negative space and proportion helped me a lot in these last two.  I did not find any difference between taking a measurement of the proportions of the mushrooms or the mountains.  In both situations, it helped get more faithful representations of reality.
    • Craig
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      cmflyer
      AC05B768-4FFD-4379-8C63-95D2AF9C0629Pretty amazing how easy it is to use this method. Helped me get the proportions right on this planter.
    • Madeleine
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      mlenagh
      It took me a good hour and lots of erasing and re-drawing to get the proportions right on this, which I made from my own photo. Even though the photo was a square format, I ended up making the tiger too large and therefore losing my negative space. I did find the measuring useful, though trickier to use with a photo. And I still managed to get the right eye (our left) in too close initially and having to correct it. Same thing with the chin, which was initially too small and needed correcting. So a modicum of perfectionism (not my strongest point) is a good idea here! Interesting observation: I always think of tigers as being orange and black, even though I spent almost 2 weeks photographing them in the wild last year. Now, when I started adding color, I realized how much white they have. tiger
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Wow, beautiful! I drew a tiger face last year, but it took me 3 hours! Cats have incredible eyes!!!
    • Madeleine
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      mlenagh
      seashell drawing This is more challenging than I thought it would be. Using my eraser a lot!
      • Madeleine
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        mlenagh
        The vertical photo doesn't seem to work, sorry
      • Madeleine
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        mlenagh
        seashell drawing Better
    • Constance
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      constancekel
      IMG_2050The use of proportions really helped in that I tend to get so interested in one aspect of the subject and make that aspect too big!. This forced me to keep that tendency under control. I focused first on relative proportions and then started using negative space, too. It was rewarding that they worked together. I was able to use the proportion techniques on a still plant, but it takes me a long time. It will take a lot of practice before I can do this with a moving subject.
    • sondra
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      sondralynne
      5C437A32-2964-4967-9F17-90630282B490
    • Martha Davis
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      pattonmd
      IMG_4926 I've been working on proportion with landscapes, too, but I've continued to work with leaves a little. This upside down maple leaf was on the library walkway across the street from me. The iconic maple leaf shape is not so obvious because the points of the leaf are largely curled under.
      • Timothy
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        balloon_pilot
        I really like the way the high contrast shading brings out the veins in this leaf. You wouldn't see them so much from the top.
      • Pat
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        ptfojut
        Nice contrast
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      amy_jay_bee
      F3805605-4295-465F-AA0C-F6F8BEE8C155 I think this class is working! I looked at this eggplant and thought how pretty it is, but expected the drawing to be mush. The actual eggplant is prettier and the shadows need something, but I was pleased with how it came out. It turns out that my middle-aged eyes can see either the pencil point or the distant object but not both, so I’ll need to experiment with checking proportions. Negative space helped for getting the leaf shapes right. Gesture drawing frequently also helps: it makes me decide what’s essential.
    • Tom
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      ebirdtgill
      I liked the lesson/reminder about “negative space.”  I say reminder because I’ve heard of the concept before and even “studied” it a bit while reading and doing exercises from “Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain” about 35 years ago.  I found the concept very helpful applied to this science journal focus.  Recently I was in California (from Wisconsin) and my granddaughter came rushing in from outside and said excitedly, “I found a bug!,” and I “humored her" and went outside to see...HOLEY MOLEY, she was right!  This beautiful praying mantis was just hanging around on their patio and I took a pic, then let it crawl on my hand (I remembered from somewhere they don’t really “bite”--other than maybe decapitating their mates) and it became my subject when back in (now cold and snowy) Wisconsin.  I drew a frame around it for rendering purposes so I could use the concept of negative space to help me with the complex shape.  That also allowed for the insect to "break out of the frame" which I wasn't planning, but really liked the effect. I like using colored watercolor pencils, and this was the first time that I scribbled a bit of pencil pigment on the page and then dipped my water-filled brush into it.  This allowed me to mix dry color a bit. An interesting experience.  I finished the drawing with a few extra strokes of the pencils directly on the drawing to give a stronger accent of color.mantis
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        amy_jay_bee
        Nice! Welcome to CA! The frame helps me too with negative space.
      • Pat
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        ptfojut
        Thanks for the tip, I have a great many insect photos so I will try your techniques
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Wow, great drawing! Like it coming out of the box, great layout.
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      hollysnuts
      Was anybody in the class a drafts person B-4 he or she became a interested in field sketching and journalism? I was taught about measuring proportions most simply using a pencil at arm's length or holding my thumb on my paintbrush at arm's length to make measurements and count. Another thing my first teacher suggested re: measure, focus & proportion was use two sheets of printer paper folded into perfect rectangles;  from the folded tip , cut a 1"square from the center of one sheet & from the tip of the other cut a perfect 1"circle. This paper tool worked like the 'squint test ' Fuller asks us to use. Scan3
    • Barbara T.
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      btyczkowski
      2019-11-11 flower
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LindaMizzell
      The measuring technique helped me with this indoor plant. Being even more aware of the negative space helped with proportions and determining measurements. IMG_1339
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      mickelboro
      I have always liked small landscapes.  FDSC_9462or this lesson I picked a spot I created in the backyard.  Since I made this spot it attracts a lot of the neighborhood wildlife.  I was able to use the tools taught in the lessons to set up the proportions for this quick sketch.
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      hollysnuts
      I don't remember Prof.Fuller talking about the use of a hand lens B-4 and I'm curious [as I've not had the chance to look it up yet myself], but I can imagine what such a device might be. I think the 'pik glass' [a handheld tool, almost like what a jeweler uses] my dad gave me would serve the purpose. Holly
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      donnacnh
      A comparison study that I tried to keep to the right proportions, I did use a ruler because the piece of plant was in my hand inside by the time I finished.  Using a hand lens helped for some of the tiny details proportion at the tiny scale is a challenge too.   CE26441A-421B-4121-9209-C8DAD88DCAA0
    • Joannie
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      galjag
      I found that measuring proportions in the field has helped me a lot.  Not so much on moving objects though.  But I now can get a pretty good idea on moving objects since I think about it now.
    • Kati
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      KatiJackson
      i wasn't able to get outside, but my cat proved to be a great source for getting proportions right. For the most part she sat still long enough to get good measurements. Proportion has been a struggle so I'm glad to have had this practice!
    • Montecito
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      favelasco
      This measuring technique worked better for me when drawing landscape, not to the smaller subjects. For smaller works better the other technique taught on the video. This measuring techniques are great, they really help to get a good proportion.
    • Sandy
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      SRMelton
      IMG_2608
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        amy_jay_bee
        Verbena?
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Sustra
      It really did help to have a reference point to start. I'd noticed in my turkey drawings that I didn't have the proportions correct for each area of the bird. They have very small heads leading to a very large intricate body so I will draw them again and get closer to the actual dimensions. What I've drawn is a hibiscus plant while it's blooming. They normally only last 2 days at most so was glad to capture it and will redo in color as we get to that area. Hibiscus-proportion
      • Laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        BartelsBirders
        Susan, the hibiscus is so lovely and accurate that in my mind I am seeing it in color! My mother-in-law loved these plants and for years I had one of them in our bedroom. I see those flowers in your drawing. Cheers, Laurie
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      donnacnh
      FD87EDC0-6C64-4CF9-8491-2F64BC415B85 Some samples from our walk today. Working on observing and recording when I don’t have my notebook.  Fall tree nuts are interesting and we found some branches of oaks too.  Brought them home with us to draw and some from memory too.  Using some texture and shading new skills and trying to get the proportions better represented.  I like the challenging exercises.
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