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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      After reading the different definitions of inquiry in the chapter and considering responses from other course participants, what is your concept of “inquiry?” Through the discussion board below, share your definition of inquiry, and an image of the concept map you drew. You can take a picture and upload it to the discussion below.
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      akleinsorge
      My definition of inquiry is:  a process by which curiosity sparks questions,  experimentation occurs, feedback/data is received, and results are observed. Inquiry beginning concept map
    • Sharyl
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Cuyamaca 2014
      Inquiry is a thoughtful and creative process that uses a variety of tools and techniques to answer questions and/or solve problems.
    • Ron
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      ronbrohm
      IMG_20200913_200903
    • Ron
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      ronbrohm
      I believe inquiry is the scientific process of learning through curiosity and wondering. By observing, asking questions, brainstorming, collecting data, researching, experimenting and processing all information we can then receive valuable feedback and draw conclusions from our investigation. Through exploring, we will uncover concepts as we investigate. "What do I know" and "How can I find out more" are questions we continue to ask to discover more as we become independent thinkers and lifelong learners. Intrinsically speaking, I also personally  believe inquiry is sparked within us through a collaboration of our 5 major senses (sight, touch, hearing, smell and taste) being "unable" process or understand something which we have encountered or observed which therefore internally creates curiosity, and wonder within us along with a strong sense of discovery and exploration that motivates us to inquire and find out why our senses can't process or understand this. I believe that this internal process, discussed above, is what causes us to become interested in inquiring about something in the first place and that this is possibly what produces the initial natural "spark" of interest in us to find out why, and want to learn more, and to question and and to challenge. Inquiry is a process of discovering truth through science and involves taking chances, random analysis, data collection, research, analysis and drawing conclusions from these efforts. Concepts, theories, understanding , progress, and insight are the wonderful by-products and dividends produced from inquiry.
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Banjojanie
      The following quote from the article resonated with me: "Inquiry is the science, art and spirit of imagination." Inquiry allows us, as human-beings and learners, to remain curious and to wonder about our interactions with the world around us. It provides a pathway for critical, logical, and creative thinking as we set about describing something that captured attention... about something we wish to investigate, to understand, to solve... Inquiry, practiced life-long, is an antidote for: boredom, stagnation, prejudice, despair, and feeling disconnected from life. This is my concept map to represent elements found in my thinking about Inquiry pre and post reading the assigned article. Inquiry_pre-reading inquiry_post reading
    • Jodi
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      jodigirl131
      Inquiry is the process of learning through questioning and exploration. It can begin with brainstorming that will reveal prior knowledge and create interest and engagement. Exploration can include experiments, research or other learning activities. Students will discuss and analyze to find meaning or reveal new questions. Concepts are uncovered as students investigate. As students analyze their investigations checks for understanding allows assessment of the concepts. The final step is processing for meaning to allow students to understand and take ownership of their learning.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      cterranova
      Inquiriy is learning process that is self directed- a spark. It is about being engaged, and interested, and curious. Inquiry is asking questions, and then being okay with not having an answer right away. Inquiry is about  just letting the questions hang in the air as students explore possible ways of learning more. Through patienence, obeservation, and reflection, students create new understandings through their experiences. IMG_3188
    • Tracy
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      tbandy34
      thumbnail_IMG-3019
      • Tracy
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        tbandy34
        Inquiry is a systematic, organized approach to research and is typically project based. It is intentional and relevant to the person/people conducting the inquiry so it provides the participant(s) with ownership. The results of the inquiry are visible. All of these factors related to inquiry have the potential to create long-term learners.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      Lingibbs63
      Inquiry is a process of evaluation that allows a person to categorize knowledge, master a skill, solve a problem, and derive meaning when they encounter something that challenges their current knowledge or sparks their curiosity. Inquiry may be inspired by an observation, challenge or experience that inspires curiosity or raises internal questions. The nature of the question or curiosity then leads to investigation and/or further observation that continues in a feedback loop until a conclusion can be formed. The process is one that is repeated whenever a challenge to previous understanding, or a new experience or observation is encountered. Being an informal educator and biologist who primarily has taught outdoors, this teaching process is very familiar to me. I find it incredibly rewarding to see others' spirits light up with curiosity and wonder, and see them work through the process to better understand the world around them.Inquiry Concept Map
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      CoachGoody17
      Inquiry is a process which empowers lifelong learners to make connections, take risks and solve problems.  It is a discovery process where one takes ownership over learning by making observations, asking questions, and seeking answers.  They draw from background knowledge, prior experience, and curiosity to participate in a more flexible and subtle scientific process that alternatively is more demanding. By using this process of collecting data, drawing upon resources, and clarifying misconceptions, one is able to communicate their findings. What is Inquiry?
    • S
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Ladyhawk85
      My concept of scientific inquiry starts with wonder which ignites curiosity about the world around you, which leads to questions: what do I know about this, how can I find more information, is there someone I can talk to? This often leads to the, "Yes, but" or "I think" and a theory evolves. Then comes active observation and finding a thread to investigate - to compare and contrast which leads to an "in-depth" question and further exploration and evidence gathering. Analyzing what you gathered and applying it to the world around you - full circle.IMG_20200715_124215
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Lingibbs63
        Your description of the process is just how I interpret inquiry, too.
    • Raz K
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      raznrol
      Inquiry is a desire to find answers to a specific question or topic through research, visIMG_20200714_180629626[1]ual tools, discovery, community interviews and observations.
    • Pam
      Participant
      Chirps: 33
      Pam Hosimer
      Inquiry allows students to ask a question then find the answer themselves, not just be given a fact to memorize as the correct response to the question. The memorized fact is soon forgotten, but the lived experience of solving the problem on their own, or with a group, becomes personal knowledge. I love this kind of teaching! My Inquiry Concept Map - 7.13.20
    • Nikki
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      mswallacexth
      Inquiry is finding answers to questions from many sources such as experts, experiments, field work, text, articles, and questioning. Inquiry should be contextual to the students and their surroundings. Inquiry should also appeal and be relevant to the community that is being served especially when it is combined with problem based learning. inquiry_wordcloud (1)
    • Julia
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      j.hardy
      The inquiry learning process is fundamentally the wonder of an individual or group of learners that have questions and is willing to seek answers through many pathways and some that may lead to additional or new questions to provide deeper understanding and learning.   20200712_162629
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      Curious621
      I found the article very enlightening, especially the myths associated with inquiry.  I am a high school teacher and think I want to use more inquiry in my everyday classroom activities but struggle to fit it in and cover the required material for end of course tests.  I teacher upper level students who complete very thorough research projects so definitely inquiry there but I find it harder to work it in with my lower ability students.  I guess I need to learn more on how to guide them and help them stay on task in a more open learning format. cornellinquirymap
      • Pam
        Participant
        Chirps: 33
        Pam Hosimer
        That was a thought-provoking section about myths, wasn’t it? I especially appreciated debunking the myth “doing hands-on science is the same as doing inquiry” with the term “cookbook” activity. Why do we have to teach this way? Trying to use more inquiry will be a struggle for me too! I am a pre-K through 5th grade nutrition educator teaching at five different schools. I must use mandatory curriculum that is scripted which does not allow for much flexibility. I am hoping to find a way to be able to inject inquiry into what I can personalize in my teaching.
    • Sylvia
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Sylvia_Qualls
      I think of inquiry as a fundamental curiosity/wondering/questioning that is driven by observations, most commonly sensory observations. These may be stand alone observations, or repeated observations that follow a pattern of days, weeks or months etc. Inquiry also includes the process of determining how to research or collect evidence, knowledge, or data to answer questions that are being asked. Within the specific process discussed in the articles there is a socio-cultural orientation and valuation to specific methods of inquiry, and kinds of knowledge. There are a lot of things I am thinking about with respect to "inquiry" and how I want to define it and approach it with my students. Mainly what occurs to me is that students need unstructured opportunities for observing, and discussion opportunities for deciding what they value, or find interesting to generate a sweet spot for their own questions, and the tools that they think will support them in documenting their own experience so that they remember it, but can also follow up and begin a path of investigation. Concept Map
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      jenna132
      Inquiry typically starts with a phenomenon (often from the natural world around them) that students are curious about or want to investigate in order to gain a greater understanding of the phenomenon.  Inquiry often begins with the generating of questions that students have about the phenomenon.  Once this initial brainstorming session is complete, students choose a question(s) to further investigate; they come up with a plan to complete this investigation; they record their findings and use those findings to draw conclusions, which they might share with others. Inquiry is rarely a linear pathway in the way that completing a Science experiment in linear; instead it is more cyclical.  As students complete their inquiry based investigation, they may find themselves returning to different parts of the cycle, for example, they may find that completing the investigation actually leads them to asking different questions, and so, they may need to create a new plan and further investigate to draw conclusions and expand their scientific understanding of the phenomenon.
    • Sara
      Participant
      Chirps: 30
      SaraPi
      Inquiry is driven by our natural curiosity and solution-driven brain. Our ancestors had to be curious, make observations, solve problems using trial and error, and then utilize these new discoveries in order to survive. Children easily tap into this natural curiousity, and eagerly embark on adventures and exploration to learn about the world. Education systems that nuture and encourage curiosity and observation, risk taking, and information processing should be more the norm than the exception. These skills empower students to be their own 'teacher' and promote learning beyond the classroom setting. Inquiry
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      amyeroche1
      Inquiry is a natural process humans go through as they seek the answers to life's questions, both big and small.  I think it is our job as educators to tap into this natural process and equip students with the skills necessary to more effectively engage in inquiry for the rest of their lives. inquiry
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Lingibbs63
        I appreciated that inquiry was described as a life long learning process, as well.  I agree that it's a full-circle feedback loop that helps us navigate life's challenges, becoming able to recognize things that challenge our preconceptions or find things that we have had no occasion as yet to learn about, and pursuing answers.
    • laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Vagabondgirl
      At its best, inquiry is a life-long, multi-faceted, pursuit of knowledge and understanding. It may be a solitary or collaborative process that is creative and rooted in our natural curiosity about the world in which we live. It is a continuous cycle stemming from our observations, wonderings, and ability to problem-solve. In the classroom*, inquiry is an authentic means of learning and assessing as it is student driven and action-based. Since it is based on student interest, inquiry lends itself to differentiation and a means of learning accessible to all students. Through inquiry, students are empowered with the skills to ask and answer their own questions they have of the real-world. Inquiry is cross-curricular and a heavily integrated approach to education that focuses on the development of the whole person impacting the intellectual, emotional, social and even physical skills of students. *the classroom does not necessarily mean a room with four walls... it is the place where learning happens. In our Kindergarten, this is often outdoors or on field-trips, in the kitchen, and on the playground.Inquire1
      • Laura
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Curious621
        I love the spider web here  and the idea behind it- that inquiry knowledge gained branches out into future experiences.
      • Pam
        Participant
        Chirps: 33
        Pam Hosimer
        “Inquiry is cross-curricular” resonated with me, especially because your concept map combines science, art, and nature. Inquiry is also a lifelong skill once you learn how to use it.
      • Sarah
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        CoachGoody17
        This is amazing! I love it and I want you to teach me to use color like this! :) thank you!
    • Alana
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      C.cyaneus
      FullSizeR1 copy
    • Alaina
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      AlainaYoung
      I had fun with this! I view inquiry as a way to foster independent thinking, and encourage kids to ask their own questions and engage with their environment to deepen their own understanding of the world. IMG_1564
      • laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        Vagabondgirl
        The sweeping "in search of.." arc pointing towards "understanding" really highlights the philosophy of Inquiry. In search of understanding is a driving force of our desire to learn. I love the flow of your chart and the cross-overs, moving from general to specific and pulling it back again in on itself through your arc. Really a great capture, I think. Thanks for sharing. Laurie
    • Kristen Mae
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      kmaecarpenter
      When I think of inquiry I think of young children asking: why, why, why, why? I think this curiosity of how the world works is a natural trait of all youth. However, the reaction we receive from our many "why's" determines how many more questions we might ask in the moment and as we get older. If we're met with frustration, anger, and dismissal we may begin to lose our natural tendency toward inquiry and as we grow into middle and high school we still associate this curiosity with being annoying and uncool. But if we are instead met with encouragement, excitement and leadership, our desire for inquiry can last beyond our adolescence and well into adulthood.CamScanner 07-09-2020 13.31.39_1
      • laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        Vagabondgirl
        Right on, Kristen. I share your enthusiasm and I wholly agree that our sense of wonder is our natural state that somehow gets suppressed as we grow. I too, believe that this is largely due to the responses we have to our inquiries during pivotal stages of our development, especially during our early years and adolescence. Our educational systems also are more interested in "right answers" than they are in process which has, in my opinion, a huge impact on our willingness to take risks and ask increasingly complex questions. Too much energy spent in memorization and surface knowledge is great for trivia but poor for discovery.
    • Allison
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      allisonmurphy
      As I did the concept map I just let my mind wander and wrote down everything, so it's a little more personalized to how I consider inquiry. To me, inquiry is natural wonder and excitement over the magic in life. I experience inquiry everyday, like when I wake up in the morning and immediately look out the window to see what birds are visiting my bird feeder. Inquiry comes from experiences that make you go "huh" and make you want to keep learning new things. While this comes naturally to me in my adult life, I can see how inquiry, especially scientific inquiry, needs to be facilitated in youth. I'm very excited to get back in the classroom and help kids see the wonders in science and nature so they can gain a lifelong curiosity. Inquiry Concept Map
    • Antoinette
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      ahatzop
      Interesting article and one that should be studied in every education program for teachers....As children grow, they need time to be in the moment and explore their surroundings.  From the time they are babies, they can make a mess and naturally learn as they use their senses to explore their natural world and play with their toys. That leads to their first step of questioning and curiosity and confidence to investigate and wonder and experiment.  When children ask questions, I like to respond with "what do YOU think?" Screen Shot 2020-07-09 at 9.14.29 AM
    • Nini
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      Ninich
      Inquiry is innate and differs from person to person.  The teacher acts as a guide to reawaken a process which came naturally to the very young and needs to be encouraged as students grow and participate in school.  Inquiry drives learning which helps to motivate a student to find out more about a subject.  It needs to be authentic and include ways of processing the information so that more questions can be posed and further learning can continue.  From the reading, I realized the importance of collaboration and how it can contribute to the excitement and drive that we hope our students can find. IMG_1054
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 41
      Acorn Woodpecker
      INQUIRY is something that is part of living.  People need to learn new skills to live.  The article was remarkable in that inquiry can be used to engage students into active and meaningful learning.  The learning though inquiry looks open ended with topics and outcomes evolving.  It is amazing to see all of the concepts maps that have been posted.  These maps are diverse and extremely interesting.  Word Doc concept map
      • Pam
        Participant
        Chirps: 33
        Pam Hosimer
        The diversity of concept maps is interesting to me too! They are giving me a lot to consider in both style and substance.
    • Robin
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Salthouser
      InquiryConceptMap The process of making an inquiry starts with a question about something you want to investigate. After making observations or gathering data, the results may cause you to rethink your question or may allow you to continue to make discoveries through critical observation or data gathering. This process can also be affected by what you already know, and applying the knowledge, making sure you take into account the new discoveries. Once all the data has been collected, and reviewed, an assumption can be created. The findings can be shared and reviewed by others. I really like the emphasis how critical thinking and life-long learning skills are developed when going through an inquiry.
    • Jackie
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      JackieScott
      To me inquiry starts with some sort of observation or there is a question. Once you have that a person does some research to see if the question or observation can be explained. When we want to see how something works or if the research is true and experiment is conducted. Data is collected and a person draws conclusion. Conclusions can create more question and the process can repeat. inquiry
    • Laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      PVAbobcats
      After reading about inquiry, I’ve expanded my thinking about all it encompasses. I found the readings to reinforce the value that I believe inquiry holds, and gave me better ideas of how to share with others the value of inquiry as well as a broader way of thinking about it. A broad, deep understanding about the world around us is one of the greatest contributions I think we can make to our communities.image
    • Phanh
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      phanhnguyen
      My definition of Inquiry: Inquiry is a process used by active, lifelong learners to understand the world, using knowledge, skills, and creativity. It is individualized, and natural in children, but can be nurtured and sharpened. It starts out in curiosity with questions about some observation that doesn’t fit in one’s expectations. Through prior knowledge (our own and others’), we come up with a hypothesis, devise ways to test it, collect and interpret data. Incorporating discussions with others, we broaden our understanding and reflect to raise new questions, thus continuing another cycle of the process, deepening our interactions with the subject. The role of teachers is to be a facilitator that guides students through their own inquiry process. Inquiry Concept map: IMG_20200708_123749   And this is the "Before (reading)" concept map, for comparison: IMG_20200708_122117
    • Jessica
      Participant
      Chirps: 27
      jmckenna
      8A0D2B2C-5103-452E-B2A6-BFCA1B068576 Inquiry is the way humans learn about their natural world. It is something humans naturally do but unless it is nurtured, we forget how to participate in the process. When we answer children's questions and do things for them we are stifling their ability to figure things out. We must nurture their curiosities and encourage them to try to find the answers to their questions through investigations.
    • Kathy Nerdy Birdies
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      kbalman
      Inquiry-learning is a holistic approach to science and a complex cycle that involves many people and does not follow set steps. It allows learners to become scientists and "do" real science. The inquiry process is learner and curiosity driven, and creates lifelong learners and a love of learning! 20200707_113941(1)
      • Jessica
        Participant
        Chirps: 27
        jmckenna
        This is a wonderful concept map! I like how you added the process in not linear and a complex cycle. I cannot agree with you more.
      • Deanna
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        DeannaW

        @Jessica Great map- you clearly captured my thoughts about inquiry.

      • Robin
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        Salthouser
        This is a very thorough concept map, and clearly defines the relationships and actions involved with inquiry.
      • Julia
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        j.hardy
        This a well thought out concept map! I think it defines the inquiry process without using the traditional definition format.
    • Veronica
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      vhorton
      Although inquiry can be defined using a variety of terms that seem endless as you continue to brainstorm, I like to think about inquiry in simple terms as finding the answers to questions about things that interest you through discovery and trial and error. Concept Map (Inquiry)
    • Kandis
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Kandis+1
      INQUIRY- An investigation to finding an understanding, more knowledge or truth about a specific topic.  inquiry
    • Smriti
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Smriti Safaya
      Screenshot 2020-07-07 at 9.00.30 PM
      • Nini
        Participant
        Chirps: 32
        Ninich
        Smriti, you have some points which I really like.  Open-minded experimentation and the need for sparks to begin the process of what about ...? or what if...?  I also really like that you consider the whole person and the character and skill development which happens along the path of inquiry and the importance of reflection.  I am curious what you mean when you say it shouldn't be overdone.
      • Smriti
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        Smriti Safaya

        @Nini Hi Nini, Thanks so much for your feedback!  I love sparks and can't help but think about my students' experience when they are in my class.  I really work on the principal that "if I'm bored, then the students are bored", so I'm conscious of their socio-emotional state as well as their cognitive state whenever I'm working with them. As for the 'overdoing reflections' - I have seen many instances of reflections being demanded of students after every piece of work or every activity, and it gets tiresome and disingenuous.  I think there is a time and place for reflections, and when done at the right times, can be very powerful.  Some of the times I think that are appropriate may not be universal for all students, so I think we could differentiate reflections based on that too.  For example, I've found reflection works well when a student:

        • makes a discovery or has an 'aha!' moment
        • arrives at/overcomes challenges in thought or process
        • has an emotional reaction to their learning
        The mode of doing reflections could also be varied and youth-friendly (too often I've seen reflections had to be written, which limits some of the critical and creative thinking that goes into reflecting), so I try to keep it flexible and appropriate for the objective of the reflections.  It doesn't mean that reflections are always easy - I would argue that sometimes they should be hard because it requires thinking about thoughts and feelings, which takes effort.  For example, if I want to capture quite spontaneous reflections, I would suggest voice/video or diagrammatic reflections.  If the reflections require a little more time, then perhaps a written form would be more appropriate, but I leave it up to the student.  If ever a reflection is part of a summative assessment (usually they are only formative), then I make clear the objectives and provide some rubric for guidance in terms of content. Please share how you do reflections with your students - I'd love to learn from your perspective!

      • Sara
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        SaraPi
        I really appreciated your use of squiggly lines to represent that the process is not static. Also love that you point out the process, not the end result, is the point of inquiry based investigations.
      • Smriti
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        Smriti Safaya

        @Sara Thanks, Sara!  The squiggles also represent my brain's journey - it's definitely never in a straight line and I go all over the place!

    • Annette
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      AnnetteSteele
      Inquiry is to want to know. Without this there is no knowledge. To inquire is to observe, ask, question, investigate, form an opinion, research and understand. The cycle is  often repeated and expanded upon.  Critical questions involve why, what if, how, when and what. Inquiry can have multiple start points and is only confined to the individuals thirst for knowledge and understanding about the subject matter.IMG_20200706_211542
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      maroberts64
      Roberts_Inquiry_Concept_Map Inquiry is taking a curiosity about something - an object, event, animal, etc., and creatively using your schema to discover and explain, and eventually build your knowledge and expand your schema. I like hearing the words "creativity" and "passion" used with Inquiry, because it's about taking the world that one knows, and using that knowledge to play and observe and gain knowledge through the passionate exploration and discovery, trying to make sense of a "thing". It's easy to see how inquiry is differentiated since it is using the knowledge and skill that a person has to scaffold their own learning through their experiences. Providing the right guidance can help keep these scientists continuing their inquiry, whether the guidance is from a teacher or peer or a family member. Exploring and trying to make sense out of something, and being able to describe your conclusions with writing, numbers, and pictures is a pretty awesome journey of inquiry.
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      MIFRANKO88
      I believe inquiry can be explained by its process, qualities and outcome. I organized my concept map into three categories - Process, Goals and Qualities. Inquiry has distinct qualities and a distinct process that distinguishes it from only using hands-on learning, active learning or the linear teaching of the scientific method in the classroom. Inquiry involves observing, questioning, collecting data, interpreting data, constructing explanations, communicating, reflecting and revisiting ideas based on a genuine curiosity about a phenomenon in order to search for a new understanding or new knowledge. Allowing students the ability to embody this process enables them to use inquiry in their everyday lives with questions that may not even be “science-y” situations. For the "goals"section, I highlighted the outcomes that can come from being engaged in the process of inquiry that I saw within the text. Specifically in my classroom, I strive to have the inquiry process lead students to accomplish the following goals:
      • Gain appreciation of beauty and wonder of science
      • Ability to continue to learn about science outside of the classroom
      • Develop skills to be successful in future science and non-science classrooms
      • Develop 21st century skills (critical thinking, creativity, collaboration, communication, information/media/technology literacy, flexibility) to be successful in future classes and career
      • Gain sufficient knowledge of science to engage in public discussion on related issues
      • To become careful consumers of scientific and technological info related to their everyday lives
      Jamboard Link: https://jamboard.google.com/d/1oa9frG1uyY2E0jRBpS50ReY44k5GVtR1MQKB_CqH-HQ/edit?usp=sharing Screen Shot 2020-07-06 at 5.00.52 PM
      • Laura
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Curious621
        I love this.  I have just recently heard of Jamboard but want to use it!  Your processing of the article was much like mine only the layout is different.
    • David Lockett
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      DavidLockett
      Interesting article. Inquiry can involve a whole new vocabulary and can tend to be complex for some. Inquiry is using one’s knowledge and understanding of science concepts and processes to solve realistic problems and issues. I made a rough concept map for a multifaceted activity that involves observation; posing questions; observing and other sources of information to see what is already known. IMG_5343
    • Deanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      DeannaW
      Inquiry Inquiry is complex, yet, simple-- hah! It relies heavily on curiosity (wonder) the drives questions coming through the imagination. Science and art help with the questions-- which includes research, exploring, designing, testing, and re-doing, and redo-ing, and re-doing. Summation and communication can occur through out the process. Everything above it rests on those 2 words.  Not a linear process.
      • Deanna
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        DeannaW
        *throughout*  (Not sure why I wasn't allowed to edit)
    • Edna
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      wvteacher87
      I found the article very interesting.  I never thought of inquiry similar to what happens with art.  Students are very inquisitive or artistic initially and are sometimes expected to follow the steps which squashes creativity. Also, I agree with students going down individualized learning paths.  Inquiry can be affected by personal interests, students wondering about certain topics and/or having a passion to learn more.  I made my concept map in a circle because I find that one inquiry can lead to another.  For example, the banana experiment went beyond whether the banana would float or sink.  Inquiry is a lot more complex than exploration. Screenshot (134)
    • Dianne
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      dhaley1
      IMG_1876 Inquiry is the process of exploring something interesting.  It is opening yourself up to the world around you just as we did as infants!  For me, it is a process of questioning, investigating, discovering, understanding and then finally, knowledge!  Which then drives us into more INQUIRY and the process goes on and on!
      • Edna
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        wvteacher87
        Exactly!  I like how you stated that inquiry is a process that goes on and on.
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      michelle_quezada
      Inquiry is a process of observing the world and figuring out the why or the how. Inquiry in science education allows for a lot more creativity and critical thinking as there are multiple ways to go about answering a question. Students are not limited to one procedure or one set of tools but instead use critical thinking skills to develop an experiment or conduct research.  People of all ages engage in inquiry even in an informal format. When I find a puddle of water by the sink I try to figure out why. Did someone spill? Is something leaking? Did a pet have an accident? From there it sparks investigation where I will go through a process to answer the question. inquiry concept map
      • Deanna
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        DeannaW
        What an excellent summation of the inquiry process. You included important points that show how inquiry in a natural part of our lives. Thanks for comprehensive graphic communication.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      alrichardson
      Inquiry is driven by an individual's sense of wonder, interest, and passion.  It is guided by our curiosity and by asking questions.  Those questions then turn into discoveries, explorations, experiments, and observations.  Inquiry gives us the opportunity to make connections to what we know, reflect and communicate with others our discoveries, and allows us to problem solve using critical thinking.  Inquiry empowers us with skills and knowledge to be independent and life long learners.ConceptMap
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 41
        Acorn Woodpecker
        Amy - your thoughts about what drives inquiry aligns with what I believe is true.  Thank you.
    • Johanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      jdelwood
      J.W. Inquiry Concept Map Inquiry is learning new information through the process of observing and asking questions.  Having an opportunity to collaborate with others to share ideas to bring about understanding enhances inquiry.
    • Vanessa
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      CPAWS-Education
      Inquiry Concept Map My concept of inquiry is based around the idea that we are there to teach children how to think, not what to think. Inquiry is encouraging/building the confidence and competence of students to formulate scientific questions about experiences they encounter in their world, look for the answer through research and experiments/more observations and then come to a conclusion based on that
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        alrichardson
        Vanessa, I love your definition of inquiry!  As a 1st grade teacher myself I really related to what you said when you stated that as educators we need to"teach children how to think, not what to think."  I also agree with you that encouragement and confidence building are both essential when teaching students.  I often feel like my students want me to give them the answer because in their mind that's what they are striving for...the right answer.  I also agree that it's important to give students the tools to help them look for answers to their questions through research, experimentation, and observation.  I enjoyed reading through your inquiry concept map too.  Great job!
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LauraYoung
      My concept of inquiry is based in curiosity -- in observing the world, and coming up with a question. This is where inquiry starts. Then, it becomes a cycle of making observations, coming up with an inquiry question, testing possible answers to that question, and observing those answers. Inquiry is supported by a foundation of strong observation and strong questioning skills.IMG_3054
      • Dianne
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        dhaley1
        Laura, I agree questioning is a HUGE component of inquiry!  The basis of science is questioning!  Nice job on your concept web!
      • Jessica
        Participant
        Chirps: 27
        jmckenna
        Hi Laura, Curiosity is the first word that comes to my mind when I hear the word inquiry. You described inquiry in a way that reminds me of a cycle that never ends. We hope our students continue to wonder and investigate all their lives.
    • Taylor
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      TSimon95
      Inquiry is a process that is driven by exploration and curiousity of the world around us. Typically, this leads to lots of questions and observations which will result in experimentation and action to figure out answers to our questions, which will also lead to more questions thus creating a cycle. It is something that is innate in everyone, particularly young children who are naturally curious and open to exploring the world around them. IMG_1984
      • Michelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        michelle_quezada
        I agree that inquiry is a cycle. In the process of answering one question more questions are revealed. I think your inclusion the term "cooperative" is very appropriate as many times students find better solutions when they question and discuss ideas with each other.
      • Dianne
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        dhaley1
        Taylor your map was detailed and very interesting.  I thought your arrows provided a nice visual of the multi-dimensional layers of INQUIRY.
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 41
        Acorn Woodpecker
        Taylor - neat idea that inquiry has dimensionality and as you uncover  one thought it exposes deeper during concept.  Very cool.  Thank you.
    • Tim
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      mrtimpopp
      Inquiry is the process of carrying out curiosity through exploring the natural world. It leads to questions, observations and experiments! As a science teacher collecting data and forming conclusions naturally follow as part of the inquiry process.inquiry
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      NRGregory
      Inquiry is a process starting with observations/ phenomena. Curiosity is ignited and questions flow. The instructor can help the group narrow down the questions to one or two that can be investigated and researched.  Peer sharing and collaboration fuel the learning and discovery. More observations and applications and elaborations of the concept are a natural product of inquiry. 821E03F6-98D8-4416-AE23-F6FBE8E4786D
      • Johanna
        Participant
        Chirps: 16
        jdelwood
        I like that you used curiosity in your concept map.  Curiosity is such an important part of inquiry!
      • Dianne
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        dhaley1
        Nancy, I liked your concept map on INQUIRY especially including collaboration...nice job!  Sometimes we forget the importance of collaboration, but I would not be where I am without it!  Thanks for the reminder!
    • Liz
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      lsiepker
      The way I perceive inquiry is that it is innate to humans. It isn't something that is taught but something that we already know to do. Seeking, discovering, exploring, questioning the world around us are inquiries into our own worlds. Inquiry also embodies the "never stop learning" philosophy because to me, just because we figure something out given the best available and current data, have we really figured it out? Do we stop asking questions? No, we do not. Unfortunately inquiry is often suppressed in traditional classrooms across a variety of disciplines so then it becomes this "new" form of pedagogy and "all the rage" which it really is not.20200325_104404
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        NRGregory
        I see what you mean by it is innate and really does not need to be taught- curiosity is natural for most young children. I suppose one reason it is " new pedagogy" is that schools have traditionally not taken the time needed to really explore critical thinking and discovery. Sometime when inquiry is seen as a mandate, teachers can take the time and incorporate this style of education more easily. A welcome swing for those of us who love science!
    • Carlos Eduardo
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      jumabita
      Todo empieza con la observacion que nos lleva a realizar preguntas e inquietudes con las cuales vamos a querer buscar y consultar las respuestas, despues de esto vamos a tener una hipotesis que podremos concluir investigando mas, comparando con otros resultado e incluso aventurarnos a experimentar, para finalmente poder realizar un aporte a la ciencia que sin duda alguna va animarnos a seguir observando y no solo eso, tambien va llevarnos a enseñar e inspirar a que otras personas lo hagan.IMG_1217
    • Elisabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      evhartman
      My concept of inquiry is seeking knowledge, solutions & answers by being a present and engaged learner. It is about satisfying the why, through observations, research and investigations. Inquiry can also be interpretive in nature, there are different methods to reach the same conclusions. image
    • Holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      hrdevault
      Inquiry is a process of asking questions related to observations. These observations are made with our senses and can be enhanced with tools. Next is the pursuit of answers with research. Check to see what information we collectively already have. New questions may arise. More observations and/or experiments may be necessary to find the answer.
    • Holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      hrdevault
      inquiry concept map
      • Liz
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        lsiepker
        I like that your concept map is circular because I feel with inquiry we might be going in "circles" or at least coming back to our initial thoughts and questions to revise them based on new data.
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 41
        Acorn Woodpecker

        @Liz Holly - I like your concept map and agree with Liz that inquiry is circular and you return to your initial question and thoughts as you seek understanding during the process.

    • Courtney
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      courtdew
      B9E50769-2565-454F-9A8E-89A5ED1976F1
    • Clara
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      RedHawkBud#1
      Inquiry is seeking information about a topic or object through observation, brainstorming, experimentation , recording results of experiments, interpreting data and collecting evidence to form conclusions and sharing results, ideas and theories. Accepting input from others to challenge evidence and support strengths and highlight weaknesses of your conclusion.
      • Elisabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 23
        evhartman
        What a great point- that accepting input can give focus to strengths & weaknesses of conclusions!
      • Nini
        Participant
        Chirps: 32
        Ninich
        I agree that accepting input from others to challenge evidence and support strengths is essential to the growth of knowledge and reminds me of the phrase "on the shoulders of giants".
      • Pam
        Participant
        Chirps: 33
        Pam Hosimer
        I agree! Being able to give and take constructive criticism or input is an important part of the inquiry process. No one lives on an island, so to speak, and both positive and negative feedback is essential to arriving at a strong conclusion.
    • Clara
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      RedHawkBud#1
      IMG_0865
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