Viewing 47 reply threads
    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      Citizen science and inquiry-based learning both tend to be hands-on, engaging, and fun for students. There are many practices that boost student learning and engagement in citizen science and inquiry that you’ve learned about so far. Which practices or approaches do you feel will be most important in your setting?
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    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      akleinsorge
      I want to get my kiddos asking more questions and feel comfortable posing them.  I feel like they're used to being handed information and/or directions in school.  I would like them to remember what it feels like to wonder things.  I'm thinking about having them start a question/wondering journal.  They could jot things down throughout the day that they wonder about.  I think it might be slow at first, but once they get in the routine of realizing they can ask questions the inquiry process will be much more kid led and much more exciting to them.
    • Laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      PVAbobcats
      I think best practices will be developed through more work with students but for now I plan to work within the new CDC guidelines and still have as open a learning environment as possible where students are given time, materials, guidance, and space to pursue their own interests and be creative while tracking their work and collecting data if appropriate. We'll use journals to record all possible ideas, creations, and more.
    • Beverly
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      bschieman
      I think in my setting as a language teacher, it is important to teach my students the language of practice in science, not just vocabulary of content, which is what they are used to.  Then learning about the language structures of inquiry and research...how can they use the terminology they've learned to describe the processes they see in the natural world and then also the processes they go through as an observer and researcher?  Before all that, developing questions in relation to inquiry is also important...how do we phrase those questions we want to ask?  Again, as a language teacher, these genres of speaking and writing are essential and beneficial, and tie in beautifully with citizen science and inquiry-based learning.
    • David Lockett
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      DavidLockett
      As a classroom educator, I want to incorporate and provide citizen science activities that are authentic and inspiring (link down).
    • Pam
      Participant
      Chirps: 33
      Pam Hosimer
      For me the positioning youth as people who do science would be the most important in my setting. The county I live in is focused on test scores and teachers are required to adhere to the curriculum and be sure all standards are taught with limited time for anything extra. STEM learning is part of the curriculum and this would allow students to do real science. And citizen science would be an additional option if time allowed.
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      CoachGoody17
      Honestly, I think both of them are important and can be easily adaptable and incorporated in what I am already doing now.  Having 50% reduced class size is going to help also in executing real inquiry studies and CS projects.
    • Deanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      DeannaW
      I want to incorporate more "I wonder"boards-- especially before they go outside so that we have a basis for discussion in later- research.
      • Pam
        Participant
        Chirps: 33
        Pam Hosimer
        Personally I plan to incorporate the “I wonder” boards into my teaching as much as possible. What a great tool – simple, low cost and able to be used with all ages! I am currently working on rewriting curriculum to adapt it for virtual learning and I may even be able to figure out a way to use the “I wonder” boards in that.
    • S
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Ladyhawk85
      I use a lot of these practices right now. As a science teacher, Scientific Inquiry is the basis of my teaching. Citizen Science would be an integral and important part of my students' experience. It will enhance the feeling of ownership of their findings when they can share their information even further. I like the concept of "I WonderBoards" boards and plan on having one handy!
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      Lingibbs63
      I plan on incorporating more "I Wonder" board activities into the beginning of my outdoor programs with families. Instead of telling them what I think we might see on a walk, I'll ask them what they think they might see, document what we do see, and compare it to the initial list. I will also try to document their questions along the way, then review which ones we answered through observation, and consider which ones we didn't answer and how we might go about finding those answers.
    • laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Vagabondgirl
      Hello Administrators. Just an FYI that the link for the article noted above:  "Science Investigation and Developing Students’ Science Process Skills Through Citizen Science" is not working.  When the link is opened we are sent to NSTA but get a message "Page Not Found".
    • ej
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      tejer!
      I don't have a formal background in education, but apparently I've naturally tended towards inquiry based learning, so it was nice to be affirmed in what I've been doing as well as see a more developed framework for the approach to enhance the class/group experience. As to a specific item - I will definitely be using the Vultures: See or Smell as it succinctly (and memorably!) captures so many aspects of the scientific process: beyond the basics of observation, questioning, developing investigation, conclusion but also the importance of repeating and continuing to refine and that even 'great' scientists get things 'wrong'. As the current pandemic has shown, even a surprising amount of adults in our society are uncomfortable with the lack of  a single, straightforward, definitive answer to a myriad of aspects of a novel disease.
    • Nikki
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      mswallacexth
      "Learn science by going science." Yes!! This is a motto that I use as an educator daily.  I always say innovating and solving local problems in the biological classroom by doing real science is the only way to make sense out of science. Creating the "I Wonder" board and discussing what is science are two great ways to prime the minds of young people to start thinking like investigators.
    • Cara
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      carafern
      I think in my setting, as an informal educator at a wildlife refuge, the most important practice would be to frame the project locally and globally. This will further help students connect with their local habitats, and realize that everything we do here connects to the bigger-picture globally.
    • laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Vagabondgirl
      My students are 4 and 5 years old. My approach will need to be modified to meet the needs of early learners and, since I teach at a School for the Deaf, a lot of our focus is on language acquisition in American Sign Language and written English. My program is largely outdoors (garden, woodlot, playground, conservation areas) where developmentally appropriate open inquiry is the most common practice. The Ontario Kindergarten Program runs for 2 years and is play-based which provides plenty of opportunity for open inquiry that is 100% student-centred. Of course, there are still some teacher-led segments of each day, but they are very short with a very specific goal in mind, and are not to interrupt a student's natural learning when they are "in the zone" of their own deep play. "Play" is a child's work and it is my job to infuse that play with new provocations and opportunities for deeper inquiry, learning and skill development through their two years with me. Confirmation, structured and guided inquiry are used less in my daily practice. Now I have a greater appreciation for the role of this type of inquiry with young students and will employ them more often and with greater attention to detail during our teacher-directed segments of the day.
    • Allison
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      allisonmurphy
      As an informal educator in a nature center, I am able to provide a lot of hands-on learning in the park. We often do citizen science events, but not as much in a smaller program setting. I feel that I need to bring more inquiry into our smaller programs. I like the idea of the "I Wonder" board. While I can't always incorporate the scientific process in activities and crafts that I lead, I believe that an "I Wonder" board could fit well into any program! The kids can contribute questions to the board throughout the program and at the end we can discuss the questions and how we would go about finding the answers. This way, the kids can take these ideas home with them and work on finding answers as an at-home extension.
    • Sylvia
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Sylvia_Qualls
      The NGSS Science practices are important for my students to understand and use so those 8 practices will be an important part of our process. I like starting with just getting outside, because that is where observation can happen, and then develop into a more formal structure of documenting observations. I also use John Muir Laws I wonder, I notice... observation tool https://johnmuirlaws.com/product/observation-question-stickers/ It is handy as we begin to formalize our observations and questions. I like the I Wonder board idea and will try that out. I also like the whole idea of exploring the kinds of questions on our board and how we can classify them to better understand which ones require research, exploring current data, observational study or experimentation. Analyzing questions will better help students identify the kinds of questions we would use specifically for some type of investigation or experiment vs reading/researching and why that is important. I do think parts of Lesson 2 from Investigating Evidence would be better to do first, such as drawing a scientist. Part of the reason is because it does serve as a kind of pre-assessment and that can be really useful when you are trying to gauge change in student understanding over time. I can do a lot of what I want because my district doesn't have specific science curriculum. We have old textbooks, but I am free to do what I want for the most part. I will teach energy, geology, waves, and structure and function as these are part of the 4th grade NGSS standards. I also teach grade 4 in California which means that  I will be teaching California History and I also teach California natural history as part of this, along with California's Indigenous Peoples. So there is a lot of opportunity to explore native flora and fauna while enjoying schoolyard and outdoor classroom walks, and engaging students in investigations.
    • Robin
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Salthouser
      I'm currently not in a position to provide an inquiry-based learning project. The case study based on the Lost Ladybug Project was a great model I would like to emulate. I like the point that the teacher should be the facilitator to guide students through a citizen science project. As a facilitator, the educator should help team members take on roles that take advantage of their strengths. Having a student or student(s) find a skill that they excel at, and that can be highlighted during the project would be wonderful outcome in addition to any other outcomes provided by the other three educator practices.
    • Julia
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      j.hardy
      Since I work as a non-formal educator and the students I see, I am adding to their classroom instruction or reinforcing what they are learning in the classroom. I feel it is best to encourage students through their observations, making personal connections, and try to add in the wonder board, since the wonder board would be something I would be able to leave with students for them to add to and the teacher can also follow through with for the remainder of the topic related discussions. Also, this may allow for me to come back and elaborate with students on their observations and may allow for my current lessons to be taken more into the inquiry/citizen science project levels.
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      jenna132
      We use the FOSS kits with my district;I have not yet gotten to view them so I'm not sure how much inquiry they involve or whether they ask students to complete a lab where the teacher poses the question, tells them how to complete the lab and record date, and then moves on.  If so, then I would really like to incorporate either CS and inquiry-learning into the curriculum.  I love the idea of a Wonder board and know that I have access to an outdoor classroom, so I can imagine using that space as a place to observe nature to develop questions and to engage into CS.  I also really want to incorporate the idea of empowering students as scientists.  Before I took over my fifth grade classroom in October last year, the prior long-term sub had students fill out a poster telling what kind of scientist they would like to be when they grow up;  I could see instead, researching, interviewing, or skyping with actual scientists in the field to learn what different types of scientists there are, but then asking students to develop poster/journal on each type of scientists and brainstorm ways that they can practice being that type of scientist through our CS and inquiry-based learning, for example, one big unit for sixth grade is weather patterns.  We could learn about the different kinds of weather scientists there are and then develop/complete CS or inquiry-based lessons that help students practice being that type of scientist.  This way they can be a scientist, not just help a scientist, which in turn will empower them to engage in science and develop a deepen understanding of weather (I hope).  I also really want to develop ways to use the ideas of students as experts who can teach other students, adults, or community members what they know.  In our school, the sixth graders have typically completed a co-taught egg hatching unit with first graders.  I think it would be great to have students use the CS and inquiry-based learning ideals to become the experts who teach the first graders.  I also really want to find more ways to have my students use what they learn in our school and local community.
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      Curious621
      I would love to do what was discussed in Lesson 1 with observations and development of the I Wonder board.  I had an opportunity to experience this first-hand through a Project Wild workshop through my local park district.  We walked around the park, came up with several questions, and then chose one to study.  It was very open-ended and would easily work in my suburban schoolyard. I also like the drawing of a scientist even for my high school students.  I think it is important to encourage students of all types to consider themselves capable of becoming scientists and their stereotypes may interfere with that.  From the webinar last week I think it would be great to incorporate guest speakers of all types so students can meet real scientists and recognize their diversity.
    • Sara
      Participant
      Chirps: 30
      SaraPi
      Since I work at a nature center, the most important way we can help layer upon classroom instruction is to encourage students to make observations. We regularly chat about what a scientist looks like and what scientists do - calling attention to alternative careers beyond the mad scientist cliche image. So far this unit has helped me understand just how important it is for students to be involved in the entire process, from proposing the question to recording the data and then the dissemintation of results. Although we don't always have time ffor this entire process in a single-day visit, I think this approach would work well for summer camps and youth mentor groups.
      • Laura
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Curious621
        In the past year I have gotten more involved in my local park district and I have been amazed at the resources and guidance that they can provide so thank you for doing what you do- it matters!
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 41
      Acorn Woodpecker
      CS and inquiry-based learning are fun for children and adults.  The young birders' club that I lead visits nearby natural areas monthly.  I would like to explore ways to make these field trips more actual science based rather than a hike for families and a chance to be outdoors. The kids attend with their parents who provide the transportation.  Most parents want their children to have these experiences or the children are interested in birding.   I wish there was a method of conveying to the parents the value of these field trips and what their children are gaining through these experiences.  This class has brought these deficits to my attention.  Furthermore,   the club often visits natural areas and the staff at these sites generously shares their time and knowledge with the kids.  These talks with the experts  (scientists) could be framed as more of inquiry experiences where the kids can ask questions.  Using the "I wonder" board may be a method for the kids to reflect and develop questions in advance what they would want to know when we talk to these experts.   I am not sure if the families and kids are utilizing the science lessons that can be realized through these encounters.  It would be great if they could take more responsibility in these field trips.   Since the viral outbreak, may of our field trip have been cancelled.  The young birders club offers these hands-on and engaging field trips, I need to contemplate a better approach to make these field trips more science bases with inquiry components identified.  Perhaps using something where the club members could stay engaged beyond the monthly field trips would be smart.  These lessons have given me a lot of consider.
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Lingibbs63
        It's hard to keep adults engaged with the kids, it's true. I, too, would like to make our field trips more meaningful scientifically. I have more regularly been in the role of the trail guide/scientist - it would be great to have 'I Wonder' questions from a group I am taking on a hike in advance! I could then ask the adults for their questions to add to the list, maybe getting them engaged as well. Cancellation of field trips has been very difficult, as so much of what we are trying to do is to immerse everyone outdoors. Virtual field trips aren't nearly as sensorial. However, you might arrange for  one or more live sessions with a naturalist/expert with your students, or have them record a video addressing the students' questions.
    • Jackie
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      JackieScott
      Stating to think of inquiry at different levels and taking that approach I think will be helpful. I can be more deliberate in how I structure my learning. There has been a lot of confirmation of my belief system of how teaching should be done.  I now have some items tools in my tool belt. I've been wondering how to use citizen science in my classroom in any capacity.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      amyeroche1
      I plan on using this whole unit this upcoming year.  I started with it this year and then when Covid hit, things went sideways.  The thing I'd like to get better at this year is becoming more familiar with some of the Citizen Science platforms so I feel more confident using them in the classroom with students.  I think I will start with Celebrate Urban Birds.  I really want to have a deeper understanding of eBird so that I can capitalize on all the rich opportunities for data analysis.
    • Phanh
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      phanhnguyen
      Because I mainly work with young students in the gardens, where anything can spring up anytime, I think the "Early bird club" and the "Wonder board" are practices that will be useful for promoting observations and posing questions among students. Also, inquiry-based and citizen science learning is local-based, with readily available materials, and can be done without expensive laboratory settings, so it'll be great for public schools with limited resources in our city.
    • Jessica
      Participant
      Chirps: 27
      jmckenna
      I feel like the most important practice or key point so far is choice of project to make it meaningful an authentic to students. By choosing a meaningful project students are invested in and feel connected to, it will be easier to hit on other key practices such as following and promoting inquiry and investigations, teaching them scientific processes, connecting both globally and locally and having youth "do science." If a project is not age appropriate or does not match up with curriculum, these other points will be very difficult to achieve.  
      • Sara
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        SaraPi
        Jessica, 100% agree. The kids have to feel it's something that is a part of their expeience - and by allowing them to ask the questions they naturally follow their own interest to discover the 'answers'. If they cannot connect it to their world - why does it matter to them? I so wish our center had more opporuntities to work with students on a repeat basis so I could facilitate an open inqiry format. What fun!
    • Antoinette
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      ahatzop
      I like the ideas of the "I Wonder" board and "Meet a Scientist."  My students were fortunate over the last couple of years to have parents and a grandparent who are scientists/teachers.  We invited them to our class, and each visit was hands-on, inquiry based, unique and interesting.  The students created "thank you" books with photos and their thoughts. We have perfect opportunities to participate in more than one citizen science project with our own garden and the discoveries we make on our own school grounds.  It will be a focal point for us this year.
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 41
        Acorn Woodpecker
        Thanks for this great idea of creating thank you books with student reflections.  This is simple, but effective.
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Lingibbs63
        How wonderful to have real, live resources who provide such great experiences for your students! I love the idea of the thank you book. I could see doing a reciprocal one if I were the person that met the students, as well.
    • Nini
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      Ninich
      I continue to believe if we can find that 'spark' of what interests a student, it will continue to motivate and excite their learning.  I was reminded in the readings of the different scientists how many of them could recall back to a time in their early childhood when something peaked an interest and their scientific pursuits took off from there.  I was also reminded of how research can be done, and then be looked at again as in the vulture study to find new information.  I liked this perspective especially because a well-known name like John James Audubon made some observations, but also some assumptions that were subsequently questioned and disproved.
    • Alana
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      C.cyaneus
      I really appreciate the reminder to share information with outside audiences. It's a great way to get the students involved and allows them to "make a difference".
      • Sara
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        SaraPi
        Sharing also helps educators check for student understanding, think on the fly, and experience that love of learning as their auidence might propose even more questions!
    • Edna
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      wvteacher87
      I love the idea of having an "Early Bird" club.  Students that get to school early or can arrive early could participate in this club if they are interested.  The eBird project will probably be a great place to start.  It makes sense to start on a small scale and build from there.   I plan on using the idea to have students design ideal bird feeding areas, and finding the best location for birdhouses and bird baths.  With all the resources I have read and listened to, I think I just need to prioritize and start with one idea find out interests and go from there.
      • Nini
        Participant
        Chirps: 32
        Ninich
        I, too, was inspired by the 'early bird' club and hope to develop this at our school in the spring months.  This along with creating a field guide of plants and animals around our school yard and possible ways for interactive models of parts of a plant or bird placed around our playground or nearby trail in the woods could spark further scientific thinking.
    • Kristen Mae
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      kmaecarpenter
      My organization is a support group for the area's National Forest and Wildlife Refuges. The students get the opportunity to explore and learn about these places. I would like to connect these lessons and experiences so that the students don't forget about their public lands once they leave the field trip. A goal of our environmental education programs is to inspire young students to become motivated citizens that will continue to protect our public lands. I think that citizen science and inquiry-based learning can spark this interest to want to protect the places they learned about and even take their new knowledge back home and spread it to their family and friends.
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 41
        Acorn Woodpecker
        Kristen - yes this is always a struggle to continue the learning once the students leave the places they are visiting.  It is so important. If you have any ideas - please elaborate.  Thank you.
    • Kathy Nerdy Birdies
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      kbalman
      I am lucky in that my program is completely outdoors and designed primarily for the homeschool community, so I don't have any standards or curriculum that I must follow, and I don't have to answer to an administrator. Citizen science has always been one of the main pillars of my program however I want to be more intentional about it moving forward. I want students to not just collect data but actually begin to use the data to ask questions and solve problems. I also want to include the step of having their peers review their claims prior to submitting their evidence and claims to scientists. I also hope they can go a step further and actually implement their solution. Throughout this course, I have used my fall theme, of invasive species as an example. So when I talk about taking it a step further an example relating to invasive species, would be them helping the park with restoration and/or eradication of the species in question. Another aspect I am adding into our citizen science work is having students create informational brochures and/or posters that they can share with the public to raise awareness about invasive species and why they are a problem for our fragile desert ecosystem.
      • Kandis
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        Kandis+1
        Intentional! That word is so important while teaching, asking intentional questions, setting up intentional outcomes!
      • Edna
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        wvteacher87
        I love the idea of students creating brochures and/or posters to inform the public about invasive species.  In our reading book, we have a story about invasive species in Puget Sound.  I like the idea of making connections children's literature to the environment, specifically invasive species in our area.  Task performance of having an end product of students work would be priceless. ;-)
      • Alana
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        C.cyaneus
        Such a beneficial project to have the students share their new found knowledge with the public and be able to actually make a difference and raise awareness!
    • Veronica
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      vhorton
      My school has an overall traditional way of teaching science that I have tried to move away from. They use prepackaged science kits and scripted curriculum that leave little room for inquiry and discovery. Students become consumers rather than doers of science. I think it is going to be real important for me to redirect students thinking about what it means to be a person who does science. Although most students in my school are drawn to science topics they seldom have the opportunity to have their questions answered about wonderings and noticings through their own investigations and discoveries. If I can offer and teach students the skills they will need to carry out their own investigations I will be kind of like giving them the tools to fish on their own. Also, students at my school are taught to be compliant to get a good grade without seeing the personal value or real world connection their learning might have. I want to help students see the real world connections and impact that  doing science can have in their lives. I think open inquiries based on students interests will help start a movement toward more inquiry based, student centered, teaching and learning of science at my school.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      maroberts64
      I can see that student involvement in observation and collecting data creates questions by students. When they are able to pursue activities to answer these questions through investigations, they 1) are more invested in the project, 2)gain confidence as a student and a scientist, and 3)become leaders and peer teachers. This process is flexible, with the ability to start and progress as teachers and students become more familiar and confident with their citizen science project. Knowing that makes this venture a little less scary, and modeling the citizen science learning process along with the students will help everyone to become more successful!
    • Kandis
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Kandis+1
      I think the most important thing to engage youth in Citizen Science is allowing youth to take the lead and internalizing the need for their research, allowing them to have time to go off track and ask more questions in an open inquiry setting.  In college I was taught the use of KWL charts, What you Know, What you Want to Know and What you Learned, as a way of assessment and youth taking a lead on their own learning; this closely relates to the “I Wonder” statements being discussed.  I love the idea of asking kids to observe their I Wonder statements and brainstorming questions.  I would use this as a group opportunity, let youth ask questions about the statements they see displayed, helping each other frame the questions as most effective for conducting an experiment.  This would allow youth that have trouble with coming up with their own research question to reflect on their statements in a positive learning environment.  After brainstorming questions, allowing time for youth to explore articles and other research being done on the topic, bringing in real-world examples and making connections to other scientist.   I also like the idea of peer reviewing, this allows for youth to see and reflect on other’s work adding to their repertoire of ideas and concepts while giving others constructive feedback and ideas to consider.   Likewise, it is important for youth to have a purpose for their research, whether they create a science project from the data they collect, create a podcast or submit their findings to the  BlueSleuth Investigator Magazine, giving youth a connection to a real-world will help instill the importance of science and how they can contribute or even make a difference. This way of teaching is not only allowing youth to gain knowledge about a topic of their choice but it is teaching youth how to become life-long learners, teaching them to ask questions and use non-biased researched based articles to seek answers.
    • Annette
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      AnnetteSteele
      I believe my students need to be the major stakeholders in Lessons. They need to develop the skills to take the lead on investigations and  bring their interests  and curiosities to the table.  Authentic experiences that are student led have a deep and meaningful impact and lead to students who want to develop and investigate their own ideas. This natural intrinsic motivation will help students become vested in their own education and foster a love of learning and the knowledge that they are capable of questioning and researching ideas,  collaborative learning and their ideas are valued and important.
    • Smriti
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Smriti Safaya
      There are many benefits for incorporating so many aspects into the educational spheres in Hong Kong, but the most compelling is to have 'a reason' to conduct the investigation in the first place that is relevant to the students' lives.  Sometimes it is about satisfying an internal curiosity, but most often the satisfaction comes from contributing to something bigger than oneself and having a positive impact on something.  I would like to tap into intrinsic motivations and curiosities, and with the range of CS projects, the capacity to build collaborative or co-created CS projects with the help of various NGOs and experts locally and globally (one of my goals is to build a database to bridge the gap between experts and public/teachers/students) and with access to technology (including DIY and Maker-culture), our imagination is our only limiting factor to support some incredible experiences possible for our students! I've written about things related to this (in a 3-min read on Medium) from the perspective of my colleague who has been one of my greatest allies while bringing citizen science into our curriculum: "Exploration + Education + Citizen Science = Students as 'Agents of Change'.
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        amyeroche1
        Smriti, I watched the video you linked.  That's really cool.  I joined iNaturalist this year and have played around with it a little bit.  I want to think more about how I could integrate it into the work I'm doing with elementary aged students.  Thanks for sharing.
      • Smriti
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        Smriti Safaya

        @Amy Hi Amy, you are very welcome!  I, too, am trying to use iNaturalist data to support inquiry with my students (albeit in secondary school), especially since they have to do independent projects/investigations in from Gr. 9 - 12.  I have found the "filter" function in iNat to be very useful for sorting through the database and allowing students to follow their interests based on taxa. Next time I think I would like to also supplement the iNat data with students own observations using a more friendly GIS method - using Google MyMaps. Here is a map I just made in less than 10 minutes of downloading the data from iNaturalist using the filter parameters: birds, observed from Jan - March 2020, Hong Kong region, threatened species, research grade.  What I love about Google MyMaps is the flexibility to present your spatial data and represent it using colours and icons to show the metadata.  I've used it with primary school students and they've found it quite intuitive too. How have you used this tool in your settings?

    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      MIFRANKO88
      In the previous discussion post, I explained how I would like to use CS to frame the work globally and locally for students in my classroom. To begin, establishing a culture of respect in the classroom that will allow for effective communication and discussion in the classroom is a first step that must be taken in my highschool classroom. From here, students will be able to 1) investigate and share their findings in a respectful setting, 2) work in collaborative groups and 3) debate/discuss how their questions, findings and suggested practices can benefit the local and global community. I think working collaboratively and communicating with teachers, classmates, and other stakeholders are important practices for students to become familiar with and to become comfortable with. Then, students will be able to further their curiosity and investigations by learning about and responding to the opinions or findings of others.
    • Dianne
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      dhaley1
      Some of the practices I feel will be most important and work best in my classroom are setting my students up as scientists, have them start thinking and acting locally and globally, and of course, welcome the unexpected.  I am looking to set up some lessons and activities that will both encourage and promote my students as scientists.  Their minds should feel empowered to ask, explore and discover.  I want them to be thinking about the world around them, but then challenge them to think broader and more encompassing.  I want my students to look for surprises and relish in what is uncovered.  With these practices I hope to open up minds to new thinking, nurture new ideas and guide findings into new investigations.
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      michelle_quezada
      Engaging in citizen science projects is a good introduction into inquiry based learning in the classroom. Reading through both lessons of Investigating Evidence I noticed a significant overlap of science practices. One of the practices I am going to keep at the forefront is "positioning youth as people who do science". Through observation and data collection students will be engaged in working towards a larger goal. They will also have opportunities for coming up with their own questions. I like how the first lesson has students focus on observation and posing questions without the weight of having to find answers for them. Through time students are able to using multiple methods to answer the questions. Questions that students think are important or keep coming back to are the ones that they can later focus on and answer. It is a natural process that they authentically engage in.
      • Dianne
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        dhaley1
        Yes, I agree whole-hardheartedly that questioning and seeking answers is such a natural process and students will be authentically engaged.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      alrichardson
      As mentioned in the last module's discussion post I felt that "positioning youth as people who do science" is still the top priority for what I feel is most important for my first graders.  Even at a young age they have the power to answer those questions that ignite their curiosity through investigations and citizen science projects.   I want to teach my students to have the drive, the confidence, and the perseverance to take charge of their learning and to know that their discoveries can go beyond our school and community. I absolutely loved the idea of the "I Wonder" board that was discussed in lesson one of the text.  It reminds me of the "W" acronym in the KWL charts that we do in class...what do they want to learn?  What questions do they wonder about?  Through this "I Wonder" board students can pose questions at any time with sticky notes.  I think it's important to teach them about how to find answers to the questions that they are asking through referencing materials, exploring and analyzing data, observational studies, and experimental studies.  This is a great tool to utilize with any topic or focus and comes with many extension activities that can be explored as well.  I'm excited to try using one of these boards in the upcoming school year.
      • Michelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        michelle_quezada
        I agree with you about the "I wonder" board. I really appreciate how in the lesson students have to think how they could find answers to the questions. Although "google it" is often a response I hear, going through the different methods and having students identify which might be best to answer the question is very important to their process.
    • Johanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      jdelwood
      I believe it will be important for me to approach inquiry and citizen science projects with students having ownership of the projects.  It is important for me to respect the questions and answers students are developing as we work through the projects together.  Nothing alienates a student more or destroys their interest faster than for them to feel that their input is not valued.  In students having ownership of the project, it will be important for me to work with students to develop the plan for the project.  It needs to be a project that excites the class or at least holds their interest.
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LauraYoung
      I think positioning students as scientists will be the most important approach in my setting because I believe it's an opportunity to empower students and allow them to participate in meaningful, authentic learning. I think starting with observation and inquiries -- like in the "I Wonder" board is also important, though I think this is something that my students may need a lot of modelling of and practice in. I also really liked the example vulture activity -- I think examples and models will be very important for my students.
      • Dianne
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        dhaley1
        The 'I Wonder' board does seem like a great way to begin the inquiry for our new and upcoming scientists!  I hope to use the 'I Wonder' board to introduce 6th grade science to my new students this year.
    • Taylor
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      TSimon95
      I really liked the teaching practice of positioning students as scientists, as I think it is a great way to get students more engaged and interested in the scientific process and will also make them care more about the environment around them. Citizen science helps connect students to their local environment, and I think that we need more of this from the younger generations in order to ensure there is a more positive future ahead.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      NRGregory
      I love the Wonder Board and will most likely use some of the "extension" activities from Lesson 1 with my group. Since I do not have a set group of students for an extended period of time (90 minutes once a mo.), I would introduce the activity and lead the discussion to sort the types of questions produced on the day's topic.  I think pairing that with some outdoor exploration would lead the students to see themselves as scientists. This would be a good introductory activity as we venture into inquiry based/ citizen science learning throughout the school yr.
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        alrichardson
        Nancy, I also commented on how I think the Wonder Board would be a great tool to use when teaching.  I also liked the idea mentioned in the article of sorting the questions.  You mentioned in your discussion post that outdoor exploration would help students see themselves as scientists.  I agree with you on that for sure!  The article mentioned giving students time to share what they observed.  It also suggested that we as teachers need to practice turning our observations into questions and not answering every question that is asked of us.  For me that would be hard to do because my initial response would be to say "Wow, look at that blue bird!" Instead I need to be thinking about how to turn my own observations into questions, "What kind of bird is that?  What do you think it eats?"  This in turn provides great modeling for our students.
    • Holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      hrdevault
      For my setting, positioning students as scientists is most important. I want them to understand how the process of science works and everyone can do it not just a select few.
      • Elisabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 23
        evhartman
        Yes! good thought, I agree that positioning students as scientists is a great way making everyone feel included and equal. It also gives them the opportunity to learn new things in a way that suits them best, meaning, they may discover they love researching literature or analyzing data!
    • Andrew
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      acatt1920
      At my school, I run a nature club called Outdoor Masters. We will soon be participating in the Bird Academy FeederWatch program. I love the idea in the article of having a small group of students be the "bird watchers" before school to record the data. I could easly establish a small group within the club to do that.
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