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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      Reflect on the three teaching practices UC Davis recommends for teachers to use to maximize youth learning with citizen science. Which of these practices do you wish to model in your teachings and how?
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    • kristin
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      kangello
      Well, ideally I'd like to model all of them!  But I think the most important one is the first one, "Position youth as people who do science".  I have my labs set up as data collection activities where students will analyze data after collecting it, then make a mathematical relationship with it.  The students are used to "cookbook" labs where they are proving a relationship they already have learned.  I find that students take a while to get over the frustration of not being able to manipulate the data to get a known answer.  They need to first buy-in to the idea that they need to observe the data and look for patterns in order to develop and design a conclusion.
    • Adam
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      sweeney718
      All three teaching practices I would like to model in my practices.  The classroom environment is vital to me for any successful learning so positioning my students as youth who can do science is important.  Making them feel like they are real contributes to a larger scientific community will make their contributions more meaningful.  I especially like the questions "Could a scientist use this information?"  The second practice (frame the work locally and globally) is also important to me, especially on the local level.  Students will be much more invested and intrinsically motivated if they believe that their work will make a difference in their own lives and community.  The third practice (attending to the unexpected) is a perfect way to allow inquiry to come through in the class by allowing student discoveries and questions drive what they are learning.
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      wbondi83
      After reading the three practices, I feel like the one I would like to most model is to "position youth as people who do science". I think a theme that I see with my students is that scientists are these highly educated individuals who are smart and that they as students couldn't come up with something as innovative as a scientist. What they fail to see though is that science is a collaborative effort and anyone can be a scientist at any level. I would like to start planting in their minds that they can do experiments and collect data that they can evaluate and interpret then see the relevance this has to the larger scientific population. I think the wording they discussed in the article is an important concept to consider and one that I will need to be cognizant of as I frame these concepts with students.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christinelamont
      I have been looking at Anna and Aaron's responses and they make great sense to me. I'm most worried about being able to model, or really not model but to have the students be scientists and experts. Thinking about this as three practices is making me more aware that the first practice is where I will struggle. I'm going to have to be careful not to frame things as " helping" scientist but as being scientist. I have seen some students develop expertise on previous activities I've been involved in. I had a great experience doing water testing in Buffalo, where students became expert macro invertebrate  assessors and water testers... this unfortunately was not CS as we didn't provide our data to anyone. We did do some of the steps described with thinking out if our data  was of high enough quality for scientists to use.
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      AnnaEndreny
      I think it would be hard to be successful at citizen science lessons without doing all three practices.  But, for me,  I am most motivated by framing the work locally and globally.  I want to give students agency to solve the problems of our world-climate change, plastic pollution and equity for example.   Initially I do not think students would understand this connection unless I was explicit about it.  For example, how does monitoring bud burst contribute to local and global issues?  I imagine it is something to do with climate change.  The students know climate change is happening but how does doing this science help? I need to do more research on this topic in order to make this project more meaningful for the students.
    • Aaron
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      asirtoli
      The three teaching practices described by UC Davis were positioning youth as people who do science, framing the work globally and locally, and attending to the unexpected.  If I had to choose one practice to focus on, I would choose attending to the unexpected.  When teaching science using an inquiry approach, unexpected outcomes will occur.  If a teacher is fearful of unexpected outcomes occurring, he or she may also be fearful of using an inquiry approach to pedagogy.  When students are practicing true science, unexpected questions, observations, and results will arise.  Learning how to use these experiences to broaden student perspectives and understanding is essential.  Teaching students that the unknown is acceptable and encouraged is essential when using inquiry.
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