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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      What was the most impactful thing about creating your sound map? How might you encourage the children you teach to use their senses to observe the natural world more fully? Share your thoughts in the comment box below, and add an image of your sound map by clicking the small “image” icon under the comment box.
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    • kristin
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      kangello
      I love the idea of a sound map (currenlty it is 38-degrees and raining, so I'll have to come back to do this another day!).  My son is in 7th grade and his science teacher has them keep a weekly nature journal from the same spot.  She had them do a sound map as one of the first entries.  My son said, "This is stupid.  It's going to be wind, car, and a bird".  But when he came back inside 20 minutes later (yes! TWENTY minutes!) he was amazed at all the things he heard. What is neat about this assignment is that, like Aaron said in an earlier post, is that it causes you to be present and mindful.  You need to slow down and really become a part of your observation.  I don't think we rely much on our sense of sound.  So when we close our eyes and remove the sense of sight it allows us to observe things we never really thought about before.  And I think that is what can really open up the "I wonder" area of our brains
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      wbondi83
      I like the idea of having children do sound mapping. It forces them away from the daily activities, puts them outside and teaches them how to use their senses. This was an enjoyable experience to me and I was amazed at how many birds chirp in my neighborhood that I didn't really notice before! IMG_2595
    • Adam
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      sweeney718
      The most impactful thing was the ability to slow down and notice the things that usually are not noticed by me.  I started hearing more subtle sounds like the skittering of squirrels and the distant bark of a dog.  The time I took to make the observations was important because the longer I waited, the more became apparent to me.  For my students, I want to encourage them to take their time in observing their environment so they allow the more subtle things occur to become noticed.sound map
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christinelamont
      I think the fact there was so much , and such varied noise in my quiet front yard was impactful. If I had predicted I would have ecpected far elss and fewer types of noises. I think this would be a nice activity to do sith students. I taught with a college professor who had students sit outside and observe ( all senses allowed)as there first lab experience. It has made me think that I may not do enough with practicing observation. I really like the idea of trying the lemon activity. The teacher was with younger children but I'm not sure this wouldn't make a good start to the living environment lab series.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christinelamont
      IMG_1718
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christinelamont
      IMG_1718
    • Aaron
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      asirtoli
      IMG_20200319_082431280 (1)
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      AnnaEndreny
      When I listened, the most consistent, constant sound were different birds.  I noticed that there were different types of bird sounds coming from different places.  This made me wish I knew more about which birds made which noises and why they were making those noises.  I think at this time of year a sound map would be more exciting for kids than visual observations because there seems to be a lot more things happening when you just listen.  I could not see most of the sources of the bird sounds.  But, through listening I realized that there was a lot going on.
      • Aaron
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        asirtoli
        I had the same experience.  I couldn't believe the variety of bird sounds I heard!  They all seemed to be coming from the same place, but I only saw a few of them.  Toward the end, I was starting to run out of symbols for the different sounds that I heard.
      • Christine
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        christinelamont

        @Aaron I was a little different, I bird, so I walk ( in this case sit) about trying to hear birds. I was taken by the noises from the trees and the dead leaves. It was windy, which may have been why this was so.  My encounter with my doorstep chipmunk was its usual.... usually I'm to blame as I try to use his doorstep to enter the house.... today he was to blame... I was sitting there minding my own business when he screamed at me.

    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      AnnaEndreny
      IMG_0467
    • Aaron
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      asirtoli
      Creating a sound map was very relaxing.  It caused me to feel more present.  In many ways, it was meditative.  It encouraged a state of mindfulness.  It also made me more aware of all of the noises created by human activity outdoors.   I'm excited to try this with students.  Students are very distracted by technology, and don't spend much time observing the natural world.  I could use this activity with students, and follow up the activity by having students create an "I wonder board" where students create questions based on the observations they made with the sound map.
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