Viewing 5 reply threads
    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      Supporting youth curiosity and questions is crucial. What strategies or tools do you use to encourage curiosity and questions? How do you inspire deeper observational and experimental questions? Please share your thoughts in the comment section below.
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Adam
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      sweeney718
      The strategy I use to get students to go deeper into observation and get beyond surface level questions is time and probing questions.  Most student observation are at first reference questions, but by acknowledging those questions as a valid and a good starting point, it give students a safe environment to probe a little deeper into their statements.  I ask students follow up questions to their reference statements and give them time to go deeper into their observations.  I believe working with their initial questions gives them confidence that they are on the right track so they feel comfortable following their own curiosity.
    • kristin
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      kangello
      As someone said in an earlier post, I try to provide an encouraging and supporting atmosphere in my classroom where I allow students to feel comfortable to ask questions and be curious.  When students ask what might happen if a variable were changed in a lab or demonstration I almost always allow them to go ahead and change it up to see what would happen. I also try to take time to ask questions myself when they pop into my head and honestly tell students "I don't know".  I think when students learn that the teacher is still learning, too, it encourages them to question.
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      wbondi83
      In our classes we use a lot of case studies for medical diagnoses. Students learn how to assess patients and how to use the observations they make to come up with questions. They then have to research their observations and narrow down the focus and try to diagnose the patient. This is great because it shows the importance of listening to the patients and using the skills of observation to aid them. It does tend to lead to some close-ended questions though (ex: what disorder does this patient have?). The best lessons I have that allow for deep observations and experimentation are the bacterial or DNA labs we run. There is a lot of room for error and inevitably every year, we have some experiments that don't go correctly. This leads to a lot of questions as to why that is and I have often used these as talking points in the class or as research the students can then use to figure out why the experiment went wrong and what we can do to fix it in the future. It also leads to a lot of "what ifs" where they wonder how changing something would lead to different results.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christinelamont
      I try to provide students with opportunities to make observations. This year I got a grant for equipment and bought digital dissecting microscopes. These have been a great strategy for engaging curiosity. The slide about Keep calm and pretend its in the lesson plan made me laugh, I should have that on a T-shirt. I started by having them practice focusing the scopes on sugar and salt to observe the difference.... this almost immediately  lead to examining our finger nails, which in turn lead to making plates of under nail scraping  and trying to find the dirtiest spots in the classroom.... I am in a very privileged positions in this respect as my  elective classes allow me the freedom to let students explore. I worry that many of our "regular" classes are so crammed with content and our lesson plans restricted to getting through our objectives on a daily basis that we may kill the wonder in our rush to "teach science"
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      AnnaEndreny
      For me, I get the most questions, naturally when the students really care about the topic.  For example, co-vid 19 generated TONS of questions.  Now with NYSSLS, we start the unit off with phenomena.  Unfortunately, I do rush through the question part.  They create them and pick their top three.  Sometimes I have done lessons on closed and open questions.  But, with our new standards, I have not developed a lesson yet that gets them to change their questions to experimental questions.
Viewing 5 reply threads