• j
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I was inspired to start nature journaling because I wanted to become a better birder. I wanted to be able to identify the birds by sight, sound or even behavior. I wanted something tangible to carry with me to track my progress. I also wanted to learn how to draw my surroundings, so I could immerse myself more deeply in the natural world. More importantly, I just wanted to document my experience in nature. To have something to look back on, and maybe share with people. First assignment. draw the yellow warbler. It took me 40 min 😆 BEC41674-3C5E-4D96-B449-BD418372D52C
    • Paula
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I was inspired to begin nature journaling because I love the blend of sketching, watercolors, and writing. I feel like this will be a wonderful way to express myself.
    • Natalija
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Hello fellow natural journalers! 1. I am currently enrolled in The University of Newcastle, Australia course called Drawing Nature, Science and Culture: Natural History Illustration. It was while searching online for the topic of field sketching (which is the third week homework) that I stumbled upon this Nature journaling course. I have always been fascinated with nature journals and the way they combine text and illustration. Seeing as I am used to drawing from photographs at home, what inspired me to take this course is the desire to get out, observe firsthand and finally create a nature journal of my own. 2. My idea is to try to focus primarily on landscapes, plants and various small natural objects that I run into. I know that I would like to combine several drawing (graphite pencil, colored pencil and pen) and painting techniques (watercolor and gouache) and quick gestural sketches with sustained drawings. I would also like to work on good composition, informative notes and accurate illustrations. 3. I like that some of the journalers recorded the date, time, weather and location in their journals and some colour notations. Not my idea but I have seen in other journals scale references and dissections of plants that illustrate their structure. These are some things that I would like my nature journal to include. I have attached an example of a page that I was recently working on for the above mentioned course. It is drawing natural objects and all of them were done at home on a desktop with desk lamp lighting. Additionally I scanned and arranged the drawings and hand written text in Photoshop. I look forward to starting my nature journal and seeing how the immediacy changes my drawings, my style, composition and most importantly the new ideas this experience will spark!   week two objects small file size
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I'm taking this journaling course to reconnect with my writing life and to create more vivid, personal memories when my husband and I travel.  I want color incorporated in my journal, which is now computer/word oriented, and though I have had little training in drawing and was frustrated with a watercolor course I took years ago, this course seemed perfect for trying out mixed media in a private space, with pinpointed drawing and painting techniques.  I'm hopeful this will become a spark for creative growth, and already I'm excited by the course content.  Things that spoke to me in this first lesson are Holly's two-sided explorations with nature and with art techniques, and her discussions and drawing/memories of her "encounters" with mushrooms, pine cones, birds, etc.  I also loved Liz's journal overall--it's looseness in form but kind of chatty quality which is very personable--and I especially responded to her reminder that even unfinished sketches have memories associated with them.  I can see that if I catch the habit, it will be for all seasons, and not just the special circumstance of travel.
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Retirement and Covid came at the same time for me.  I have been lucky to be able to be outside and love it, taking walks in our little woods and working on our little garden area.  I have taken many photos and having just discovered the macro mode on my phone  has invited me into the smaller worlds I might otherwise miss.  Drawing with journaling seems like a natural occupation for me because I often sit or stand for many minutes to visually explore and observe.  I especially liked the journals with repeated drawing of one subject as with the hummingbirds and thereby learning the significant features of the bird.  All of the examples sparked inspiration.  I need to learn about drawing techniques and can see that regular journaling with illustrations will help with that. I was so happy to find the course through eBird and am excited to get started.
    • Rita
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      1. I've always been interested in drawing but have had no formal training.  I'm a photographer as well, but have had the desire to sketch when sitting along the beach, looking at flowers, etc. The difficulty I've always had is trying to figure out how other people can sketch so quickly even if the subject is moving. Also, I've gotten frustrated with watercolors in the past, but I've always loved the look.  I'm looking forward to learn how to successfully use them. I definitely want to include the pertinent data of date, location, time, and weather conditions. That is what I do in my photography. I always strive to identify any object from nature as well -- seashells, plants, birds, etc. I will definitely include the identification. I want to use a looser style to leave room for my sketches and text.
    • Cathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I belong to a Pollinator Gardening Club where I live and I would love to learn how to draw/paint the many flowers, plants, bushes, bugs, and butterflies in the garden.  I have never drawn or used water colors so this will be fun to learn the process.  I like to make collages and I think this will help me to be more creative.  I love nature and being outdoors.  I look forward to recording the sketches and journaling my thoughts and observations about plants I am seeing.  I also look forward to the time being quiet and to enjoy and contemplate nature.  I really liked Shayna Miller's nature journal as she had order and structure on each page with the boxes and I think this will be helpful to me in learning to nature journal.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I have been interested in nature journaling for a long time, and have started them off and on for years. But I'd love to get more consistent with it! I volnteered for the Wild Wonder Nature Journaling conference last year and it was really inspirational.
    • Jean
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      3F4A3DFE-9C1A-469B-A9E4-65B4A3264555 I was introduced to nature journaling in 2021 when I took a quick lesson through Sketchbook Revival.  It was taught by John Muir Laws. I love nature and I love creating.  I am enjoying sketching and want to learn more about watercolour. To date I have mostly sketched and drawn birds from other’s photos.  I would like to be able to draw them from life.  The page above was easy for me because plants move a lot slower than animals! I also took part in International Nature Journalling Week 2021 and Wild Wonder 2021.  They were eye opening experiences for me. I have so much to learn!  There are so many different ways to do things! I liked all the journals shown in the video.  One thing that struck me was the difference in the amount of time required for each style of journaling. I have limited time, so Holly’s journal really appealed to me. I can do a page a month or a small sketch every day.  Last year I jumped with both feet and tried to do too much at once. I was going in all directions. This year I want to take a slower paced, more focused approach.
    • Larry
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I am always looking for ways to learn and improve my creativity. I take a lot of bird and wildfowl pictures however as my collection grows something is missing and that is a more personal connection with my work. Some days I can take hundreds of pictures in a day but by adding journaling, I hope it will slow me down and allow me to connect more with the subject. Journaling should also help me improve my drawing and watercolour skills while adding something to my photographic skills. I haven't figured out how I want to keep my journals other than the basic of date, time, weather etc. but through practice and experience I will develop a process.
    • Terri
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I've drawn on and off over the years but never with any discipline outside of a class structure.  I'm looking for an approach to help me to tap into that creativity and discipline. I've always been drawn to subjects in nature and am an avid hiker and camper and am now spending more time outdoors and traveling.  In looking for a class to jumpstart a drawing practice, coming across this course on nature journaling was a revelation!  It seems like exactly the approach I have been looking for and I'm really excited to jump in.
    • Chuyu
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I want to begin nature journaling since I really love those birds flying through the sky and I enjoy the process of painting. I think nature journaling is a great way to combine these two interests and this process help me to enhance my drawing skills. As an beginner, I don't many specific idea on how will I deal with my journal, but I think that will be an excellent experiences to explore different style of journaling and find the suitable one.
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      My initial interest in exploring nature journaling was as a way to strengthen my sketching ability and provide possible designs for my art as a printmaker. Looking at others’ nature journals, I see that an observational journal could also be useful to me as a gardener. I also realized that not everyone is a skilled draftsman (one of my concerns, as I don’t think I am), but that useful information can be observed and recorded regardless of “artistic ability.” (I still want to get better at sketching, though!)
    • Esther
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      What inspired me to begin nature journaling is to both observe things more closely as well as improve my rendering skills. As with handwriting notes, drawing is a great way to reinforce learning so I think that’s what I’m excited about.   It’s hard to pick one style of journaling, but I like the idea of notations that go along with the sketches.
    • Olivia
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      Since I was a child have been in contact with nature, I have great respect and admiration for animals and I love to draw, so that´s the reason that I decided to begin my nature journaling, I saw the different videos and I think all are interesting, with  differents and personal approaches that brings me ideas and helps me to define and create my own.
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Desire to participate in what I’m observing with more patience for detail and form.  A way to give observing greater time.
    • Cecilia
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Why did I want to begin nature journaling? Seeing the videos of others' journals gave me clarity. I love drawing and painting. Art wasn't my career. I've spent 4 decades teaching midwives, nurses and doctors. I wanted some activities that would take my brain away from health career and stretch my thinking. I've been bird watching with my daughters for several and doing the Audubon bird count. I did the bird sketching class and enjoyed Liz's work so much that I wanted to do more. My husband jokes that when he travels with me and my daughters that we can't walk more than 3 feet without stopping for a bug, a bird or a bud. Journaling will help me document the highlights of the experience without taking endless flat photos.
    • diana
      Participant
      Chirps: 52
      F4DBC5DE-E0C4-4278-80A8-593C5B8CDCDF REBOOT: I’m restarting through this program in the new year to refresh my skills. - I was inspired to nature journal by migrating wild birds in Texas & other floral/fauna on Gulf Coast - by contrast I’m “rebooting” in the winter Midwest / Jan.Feb. - I like how in video Shayna takes a STUDY approach & learns factually through journaling. This parallels my approach. I focus less on the art now and “pretty pages” and more on paths to learning. - ALSO I like how she says her style continues to evolve and be less rigid over time, as that’s also true for me & so she’s  validating. - on my page in the photo (wind chill below zero), I wasn’t going outside, so I had to work harder to journal & from inside my window, studied skies and researched tips to help me briefly re-enter nature when it’s harsh   - ALL of the journal videos/styles & journalists  are helpful for different reasons & especially helpful as I reboot during winter & continue to evolve as a nature journalist
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I've seen other people's nature journals, and they looked like something that would keep me focused, learning, and enjoying nature even more deeply than I already do. My husband is an amateur nature photographer.  He sometimes takes a long time to get his images, so this will give me something to do while he is taking pictures and will give us another way to capture the experience. I like the journal that started with drawing and set things off with some boxes. My journal will probably be sporadic depending on when I get out, but I would at least like to enter some things each different season.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Nature has always been a major part of my art journey, but for the most part I have only worked only from photos. Keeping a nature journal seemed like a good way to capture what might be misted or skewed photographs like an understanding of animal behavior, color, and the atmosphere of actually being there.  This also seemed like a good course to take to see if I wanted to peruse science illustrations as a career or just something I would to keep for pleasure time.
    • Michaele
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I am inspired to begin nature journaling to create a record of observations I make when I stroll through a natural habitat. I liked what one journalist said that drawing creates a record of what you see. You have to look closely to capture the details, much more closely than if you just take a picture. I like that I will have a lovely, permanent record of the things I see so that I can go to a field guide and more accurately identify birds and plants that I see.
    • Xhaira
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1. I have always loved seeing nature journals of all types, even back when I didn't realize that it was an activity that real people did and sometimes took on as a profession. I found a seashell guide book when I was maybe 8 or 9 years old, and I was obsessed with looking through them and admiring the art of different shells surrounded by facts and research notes. I would write extra notes in the margins for myself even though I had no idea what I was talking about. I truly miss that seashell book. 2. I really love the idea of marking the page with the date, time, location, and weather. But I also really loved the monthly journal. The idea of just filling up pages throughout the month and then grouping them all together is appealing to me. It's a lot less structured, which works well for stretches of time where I'm not at my best. I think I want to start with the more detailed method of marking my pages, but on other days I may just mark the date and time under the drawing so I still know when it was done.
    • Joy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1. I cannot recall the exact spark, it may have been a few years ago in graduate school where colleagues shared A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold, Darwin's journies were top of mind, and I wanted to be as provocative as Rachel Carson in defining and presenting how human activities are affecting the environment to insprie collective actions for change. I've been wanting to nature journal for years and finally have moved it up in priority. I want to improve my observation and drawing & painting skills. I like the idea of having a record of a day's memories or trip memories as well. I enjoy birding and think it'd be an added way to memorialize time spent in the field where many more questions on species id arise (insects, plants, fungi, reptiles, etc). 2. I want to try being able to record movement and behavior like the hummingbird journal and dove and spider entries but have them also be even more beatiful with all the watercolor applied.
    • Noella
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I am 12 years old and love sketching  realistically so when my grandpa gave me the corse for my birthday I was exited to jump right in. I think that field sketching will be a great way to express my love fore nature through doing something I love. I liked the idea of drawing the different positions of things and to box my drawings I also like the idea to right down the experience behind the picture.
    • kat
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I've written in a journal for years - mostly for clarity in what is going on in life. I always started with the date, weather, where I was and what I was doing.  I love being outside and observing nature. Expanding my journalling to include sketches seems like a natural progression.  I like the idea of spending time to observe rather than - for example - checking off a bird and then peeling off to get another one. Sometimes that's fun too - especially if one has consumed a lot of caffeine. I like that some of the journalers had a question that may or may not have been answered. I like the idea of using the calendar. I need a bit of a push. I think I'd find it too much to do an entry each day but maybe a weekly or monthly pages would be good.  As I am not artistic, I appreciate how some of the journalers gave themselves time and space to observe, practise and write about what they didn't quite capture in a sketch. I am happy about the time of year that I am starting this course - January. Some of the days are so cold and dark but there is beauty in the subtle white, grey and blue tones and shapes of branches. If it's too cold to be outside, I can have a good look at my collection of fossils, rocks, bug bits and pieces, feathers, pine cones and leaves. Or, there's always the bird feeders to watch. Spring is around the corner.