• Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      This is a very thoughtful Christmas gift from someone who knows me well. I already mess about outside a lot, but I think journaling will help me focus on small details and it will help me ring fence time for myself. I am looking forward to developing new skills; walking in the footsteps of Darwin and developing my knowledge of the wild space on my doorstep. Gorgeous stationery and art materials already make me excited, can't wait to use this kit (and I will try no to be too precious!).
    • Evangelyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I am looking forward to giving myself time to really see what is front of me.  I like watercolors and I think this will give me a purpose that seems more doable than artistic.  Mona Brooks freed me from my terror of drawing and I look forward to bringing my journal along on my walks.  I appreciate Jewel saying that mistakes will happen, it won't always be what you planned but it is a process and cements the memory.  I believe in establishing habits and I think this will be a habit I value.
    • worker33
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I am working on a story about a specific place that has a wonderful natural setting. My interest in this class is to further develop my observation skills and augment the photographs and notes I'm taking as I conduct my research. This course offers some basic drawing techniques which I can most certainly use. I've had journals over the years and done some poorly rendered sketching so I hope to grow a bit during this period. After looking at the various journals I was most drawn to the recording of place/time/weather conditions to help recapture the moment, rather like a good haiku poem does. One of the thoughts i have is to incorporate natural found elements within the journal. Although objects may be suspect to decay overtime, I'm drawn to the tactile and believe it will be important to me to include!
    • mike
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I've been a birdwatcher since high school. I have worked as an educator and field ornithologist throughout my career. I've always enjoyed drawing but have not used it as a regular part of my field notes, a thing for which I'm a bit embarrassed to admit. I'm now 60 and recently retired and would like to develop my nature journaling to include illustrating my observations. I'm a licensed bander and often take photos of various unusual things I observe in the birds I capture (unusual plumage, deformities, etc.). I can imagine drawing some of these phenomena would be a valuable way to notice minutia that might be missed with a photograph. As far as choosing a style of journaling is concerned, I think I'm going to have to just start doing and see what works for me.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1. I love being out in nature and learning all I can about what I am seeing. I asked for this course as a Christmas present, because I would like to deepen my observations when out in the field and have a record of my discoveries/experiences. 2. It was helpful to see the evolution of their journals, as I am a bit intimidated about starting. It doesn't have to be perfect right away! I like how the first journaler used a combination of sketching and writing on her pages, and her style feels informal and spontaneous. I like the zoom-ins and how at times she treated the sketches as a field guide she could learn from & refer to in the future. 3. I don't have any new journaling ideas - but I am hoping I will develop my own style.
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I am inspired to keep a journal to help me observe and remember more than I would by photos (a point made by Jewel, Shayne and Margaret). What I would like to try is making quick sketches of behaviour and gestures of birds and insects that I encounter (discussed by  D.J. and Margaret). Drawing moving objects has been daunting to me (as mentioned by William) .  In the past I have only done watercolor of static plants and landscape. So I will see how I progress with the difficult task of fast moving birds. I intend to use lots of rough paper to practice gestures of birds before committing the drawings to my journal. I would like my journal to be a lasting memory along with a  notes, date and place. I may try boxes to add style. I was impressed by Holly's beautiful presentation style and skill in her journal but think I might not reach that  level.
    • Lindsay
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      During Covid lock down, I have been appreciating the birds both in my neighborhood and a near by conserved area where I hike regularly. I had never really paid much attention to the bird feeders set up at the start of the trail. But discovering the feeder cams at Cornell, the need to connect with something larger than myself during covid and a desire to dust off my observational drawing skills impelled me to sign up for  20201210_072914this class. I want to include the weather and other observations, not just isolated bird drawings. I'll use the live cam to practice quick sketching. For my approach, I want to include a mix of loose and organized sketches.
      • Heather
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        Thanks for the tip, Lindsay - I'll try using the live cam to practice quick sketching, which is what intimidates me the most about starting this course and nature journaling.
    • Jeff
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1.) This class got gifted to me, and I think that nature journaling might be a good outlet for me. 2.) I want to try a combination between the monthly journals and the journal with just sketches. I think I could realistically do a journal like that. 3.) I can't think of a different journaling style right now.
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I signed up for this class because I think nature journaling will help me to slow down and look more carefully at what I see.  I'm hoping that it will also improve my artistic skills. I appreciated the variety of the journals.  I like the idea of having some goals to make sure this inspiration to slow down and look and sketch doesn't fall by the wayside.  I'm thinking of a once per week goal of watching/noticing/sketching something.
    • Gina
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1) I was inspired to begin journaling as a method of holding beautiful memories on my trips. Also to help me slow down and notice small details in nature. 2) I loved the idea of journaling every day; however, with my schedule, it is hard so when I saw another artist do a monthly drawing method I was sold on the idea. I also what to capture data or details that maybe my art skills cannot like the smells, the weather that day, a little geotag perhaps. 3) I think my style of journaling will evolve but I thought about interesting facts about what I am seeing like if I am drawing a fern perhaps googling something about the climate they thrive in or variations of ferns.
    • Madeline
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I am a Field and Ecology Biology College Student and I love to draw and watercolor nature. I was inspired to combine the two things I love to do in to one. I already love taking field notes as a biology student, but I wanted to take it to the next step and include drawings and watercolor in to it. From the approaches and ideas, I liked idea of a monthly and daily journaling unique style to each.   I want to try journaling by making my goal to designate one page a month to fill and rest of the pages each day I try to see and document something.
    • Cristi
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1. I spend as much time as I can in nature and love observing nature, I write my sightings but have never considered a journal specific for nature. I love the idea as it could help me to remember, distinguish and appreciate the animal at that moment in time. It also may encourage me to be even more observant about an animal's behavior or characteristics. I will spend more time in nature and observing every day! 2. I like an organic flow to a journal with sketches or watercolor with comments, description and behavior of the animal. I also would like to incorporate my experience in observing and being present in this particular place in nature. 3. If possible I would put the occasional flower, stem or leaf in the journal if the space allows.
    • Judith
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      My careers have been steeped in words and numbers, and so I want to work on developing my visual skills. I want to "see" better. My journaling goal is to slow down and observe the details of the plant or animal in my focus. I'm also an art quilter, and I'd like to be able to incorporate drawing/painting into that art form.
    • Erica
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      My goals are to become more intimate and curious and tune my observational skills.   to still my brain, processing piece and just be present, and really see.  I also like the idea of afterward doing a bit of science or data about it.  May it grease the creative cogs!
      • Kathy
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I admire and echo your thoughts.
    • Brandii
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I recently moved from Alaska to the Oregon Coast. In Alaska, I grew up learning all the flora and fauna, what to eat, what bloomed fist, when the moose calves dropped. In a new state, I have found that my extensive knowledge is barely adequate. It is harder to learn as an adult so I decided nature journaling would be a good way to recreate that emersion learning experience from hours spent in the Alaskan woods as a child lost in wonder.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I've been doing some field sketches since the pandemic began.  We have hiked at many of our state parks and spent time at the bay over the summer.  My journaling so far has been a combination of reflections, lines of verse that are like poetry to me looking back.  I have just done pencil sketches of landscapes, plants, flowers and a few birds but am interested in learning how to add watercolor, since I always make a note of the colors I observe.  Having a notebook made of better quality paper will probably help!.  I love that the one woman sketching the hummingbirds didn't worry about how many times she tried or how may pages she used up!  That is encouraging to me!  I will definitely be making note of where I am at the time of the entry.
    • Kuria
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I have always wanted to start nature journaling and the last big push for me to really start was reading a book called "Explorers' Sketchbooks" by Huw Lewis-Jones and it was just simply stunning seeing all these sketchbooks over the years. I was thinking of journaling like they do in the book, much more writing along with the field sketches.
    • Tracy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I have loved nature for my entire life and have come to love watching the birds at my home feeders for years. A friend mentioned the Cornell Feeder Watch program as she's a feeder watcher, too, and we decided to take part together so we could share in the experience. In doing so, I discovered this class and I was excited by the prospect of being able to draw some of the birds that I adore watching and learning more about. As a much younger person, I loved and had a knack for drawing and painting but didn't continue in any structured way into my adulthood. I saw this class as an opportunity to rekindle the joy I once had in doing so. I have a background in science and I like the idea of creating my own little reference book of the nature without and within my home with, of course, notations of time, place and conditions. I especially liked the format of drawings being surrounded by text, and the drawings being both detailed and broad, as in the finer details of a feather vs a silhouette accompanied with a full landscape view. I appreciate each journalist's perspective and after seeing all of them, I feel like I have permission to be experimental and imperfect and let my journaling evolve, or not, as it will.
    • Angie Paola
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      A: 1. The idea of being able to create your own description of the observations, as well as the most representative moments of the trip, make your own sketch inspired by those observed. A: 2. I really liked Shayna Muller's approach, the order in which she does them where she puts the illustration or drawing first and based on this she makes some descriptive notes attached to the drawing. A: 3. I also liked to attach my own photos to my diary, especially of new species "lifers".
    • Sandra
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Enjoying nature and taking time to feel creative is very important during these difficult times.  Our daughter lives across the country, so she and I have enjoyed experiencing these excellent classes together.  We connect online and work together.  The program is amazing, and it has already made me see the world through different eyes.  Journaling will add joy to my life.
    • Sherrie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      My love for birds and art lead me to this class. I've started many journals through the years and as I reviewed them I noticed all the little drawings I had done. I enjoyed seeing the various art journals in this lesson and I feel it would be fulfilling  to release some of my creative energy that's been on the shelf for awhile. I'm looking forward to learning Field Journaling.
    • Florence
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      I got interested in journaling after taking online classes.  I love drawing and painting flowers in particular but also birds.  I saw classes offered  in my Cornell lab  email and this  one in particular.  Also want to improve my watercolor painting.  I have gotten some ideas on journaling from the videos and will see where this leads me.  Learning how to “see” is where I need help and this class is doing that for me.  Thank you Liz.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I have always taken photographs of nature that have interested me. I thought this would be a different way to observe and record those things that have attracted my attention. I like the concept of drawing an item, bird, flower or landscape and then incorporating a written description along with it. Also including the date, time location, weather conditions and maybe questions about the subject.
    • Peggy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      My friend, Lisa, told me about the course - she's my drawing and painting buddy - so I signed up. The idea of nature journaling appeals to me because if I want to draw or describe an aspect of nature, I need to slow down and really take time to notice all the details. Noticing the details of a bird, leaf, etc., will make the interaction experience more memorable. I want to be looking closely and appreciating nature. I feel like journaling will help me along this path. After looking at the various journals, I definitely will include the date, time of day, weather, and location for each drawing or notation.  I'd like to include color, using the portable watercolor set - watercolors are challenging, so nature journaling will allow me to improve my skills in this area. I liked the "zoom" technique one of the journalers used - to show greater detail of a larger sketch.  I realize even if I can't fully capture all the details, the sketches and notes will be a reminder of what I saw. I like the idea of what one journaler did with the boxes - kind of a way to make the space of the page less daunting. I may use that techique.
    • lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I can’t even imagine being able to do a nature journal but I LOVE birds and recently took another of Liz’s classes and she actually has me convinced that I can draw!!!  It was enormously helpful to see the different journaling styles as well as the approaches to capturing impressions.  I’m looking forward to learning how to SEE!