Viewing 32 reply threads
    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      Which citizen-science projects have you used with learners, if any? Do you have any advice or suggestions about how to participate in the specific project you have used or with citizen science in general? If you have not done a citizen-science project with learners, reflect on the readings and how you might incorporate citizen science.
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    • Ashley
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      ABloch01
      I haven't used any citizen science projects with my students, but I am looking forward to incorporating some of these into my classroom in the future.  I think they will be a great way to get my students really immersed in the material!
    • Frank
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      fduross
      Last school year I had my students complete the Cornell Lab of Ornithology - Celebrating Urban Birds activity.  On three separate days I took the class out to a small park near our school so that they could collect data.  There were a couple of challenges that arose.  First, students really did not see many birds, I think they found this pretty disappointing.  Second, students did not have much background knowledge of bird identification.  I certainly could have spent more time on helping students to identify the different species.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      AmySenn
      I haven't really used any citizen-science projects in the past.  I've signed up for project Feeder Watch for this year.  I had some GLOBE training a long time ago as a part of another program.... it might be something I would revisit. The CoCoRaHs program looked like it would be pretty fun for kids to keep track of precipitation and make a hail pad. Because they want the data in a particular time frame, I am not sure how to include all classes.
    • ruchi
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      ruchi.rai
      I have been conducting a Citizen Science Programme with students of grade 9-12 in association with Vulture Conservation and Breeding Centre at BNHS (Bombay Natural History Society) in Rani, Guwahati ,Assam. We have been working with the local people in order to conserve the Vulture population of the White backed and Slender-billed vultures. Our students have been conducting Art for Conservation programme for the village kids and have been designing lots of Street Plays and performing the same to generate  awareness.Also, they have been learning and understanding the science behind captive breeding programmes.
    • Jenny
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      jambud
      For several years I had our students (grade 10-11) take part in a citizen science project of their choosing. This was often a winter or spring break project. Students overwhelmingly chose something that they could do from their computers. They often found something on Zooniverse where they were transcribing, identifying objects in a photo, or playing a game. Eyewire was always a favourite. They would need to spend a total of 5 hours on the project, where up to 2 would be spent learning about the project and figuring out how to do it. I wanted students to get a sense of the amount of different projects out there in the hopes that they would continue with one that sparked their interest. I also wanted them to be part of a larger scientific experience. Over the years doing the citizen science project with students I have tweaked small things such as doing the projects in a small group to reporting back to a larger group, to try to increase accountability to complete the project and to encourage deeper processing of what they were involved with. The science being done behind some of the citizen science projects can be a little hidden. We did have success in getting students to dig deeper by asking students to identify parts of the experimental design in the project they were participating in. Our group of students is really keen on doing science and even though they are part of the scientific process and contributing data it doesn’t always feel like it to them. I never heard any follow up as to if they had continued with one of the projects. They generally enjoyed the work although many reported being either frustrated with technical aspects or tended to get bored over time. I am hoping taking this course I will see some new ways of integrating citizen science into our program. I think having the science being something that students experience away from their computers would be ideal – observing physical phenomena.
      • Maria (Dede)
        Participant
        Chirps: 74
        dpander37
        I like how you "increased accountability" having small groups reporting back to the larger group.
    • Sue
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      SueWatts
      In our Junior Naturalist After School Program. We have tried the Nature's Notebook Dogwood Project - we had great fun talking about phenology and going out and tracking the progress every time we met (every two weeks) but we never sent in the information - there was never enough time and that seemed an insurmountable task. I think if we had familiarized the students with the website and used it to illustrate what the plan was and how their collected material would be used by real scientists the last step would have been easier to accomplish. Because we only have an hour and half every two weeks I like to get them out into nature straightaway. So, even though I love the idea of these projects I feel like I have never really had the courage to submit results. Over the past couple of years, I have become increasingly interested in Moths and next week is National Moth Week https://nationalmothweek.org/.  I am going to try and set up a light and a sheet at my house on Saturday night and document the moths that visit. They suggest using Project Noah - which I have been playing with today. Their mobile app is being redesigned but I can easily upload from my computer. Project Noah also has connections to other projects, too many to list but check them out here. https://www.projectnoah.org/missions
      • Ashley
        Participant
        Chirps: 23
        ABloch01
        The Junior Naturalist program seems like a great after school club!
    • Lauren
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      laurenscull
      I have not used any official citizen science projects with our guests. Personally, I have used Seek and iNaturalist and have done some research as far as incorporating Frog Watch. Since most of the guests we see are only there for a short time, and not extended, I would like to offer a Frog Watch program in the spring, or even Project FeederWatch. Essentially, it would be a 2 - 3 hour program with a classroom portion to discuss how the project works and how to ID amphibians, followed by a hike out to our creeks and vernal pools for some in person data collection together.
      • Maria (Dede)
        Participant
        Chirps: 74
        dpander37
        A Frog Watch lesson sounds good.  Taking students on a hike for observations is a great way to generate interest.
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Laura Schofield
      I have used the Project Budburst with my 6th graders, which I hope to help expand into the 9 other middle schools in our district.  Some suggestions I have for having students participate in this project are all about communicating with your school community about the project's goals and expectations:
      • Prepare students for going outside in all types of weather. I do this by having students draw diagrams of types of clothing and supplies that will make their trips outside to observe the trees more successful and pleasant. Each student's diagram goes home to families with a letter explaining the project and when students will be going outside.
      • Get your principal on board. Meet with your principal and explain what Science Practices and standards students will be addressing during this project. Be clear on how and when the data will be collected.
      • Speak to school nurse to address any possible health concerns - I have had students with different health issues, which required a second adult to walk to the playground with our class to make our observations.
      • Set students up for success, practice with the students inside the classroom, the tasks they will be doing when outside at the research site. I.e. measuring leaf size, sketching branches with leaves, identifying stages of bud burst
      • Be explicit with behavioral expectations.
      • Martha
        Participant
        Chirps: 23
        Martha gardenbird
        I appreciate your details in preparing the school community. Sometimes, getting the principal on board has proven the hardest for me! I so look forward to the return of field trips--even if they are only walking field trips at this point.
      • Bridget
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        BridgetL
        I'm with Martha, your details are helpful!  I definitely like the idea of having the students practice the skills before heading outdoors.  I would like to incorporate this program in the coming year and your list has given me some things to think about and start putting into action in regards to having others get on board/offer support.
      • Kristin
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        KristinBlack829
        I'm looking to do Budburst this year, so this was very helpful. I love the idea of the student-created diagram/list of appropriate clothes and gear.
    • April
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      AprilWhitehead
      I have not implemented citizen science into the STREAM Lab, yet. I personally use iNaturalist to log observations of (mostly invertebrate) animals in my area. I think the Project Feederwatch would be the best fit for my students and classroom. I have a wall of large windows facing the playground, and I think that would be an excellent place to place feeders (after adding bird-strike prevention decals). Logging information will be something I will lead with my specials classes; however, I plan on inviting our classroom teachers to participate as well. We are fortunate to live close to the Gulf of Mexico on the upper Texas coast, so we have an excellent diversity of bird species year round.  While many of those birds don't visit feeders, I'm hoping we could attract migrants during the spring and fall.
    • Jon Javier
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      jagjavier
      If we define citizen science as the active participation of the general public in the process of observation (a subject either in the natural or material world), collecting and sharing data for utilization by professional scientists, then the citizen science project that I mostly used with our science high school students is eBird. Please note however that I am not a natural science teacher, but a technology teacher teaching the subject 'Introduction to Computational Thinking' to eight-grade students. For this reason I myself is a citizen scientist contributing my observations through projects like eBird, iNaturalist, Habitat Network which I used to map trees in the campus and visually define the local environment of the site (how I miss using the app of this project and looking forward to its return), at times participating in the annual Asian Waterbird Census (AWC) through the Wild Bird Club of the Philippines, and collaborating with a corporate project Energy Development Corporation - BINHI to help conserve premium and endangered native tree species by hosting a number of species in the campus. Even though I have no direct influence to our learners to use a citizen science project in a classroom setting to help immerse the students in the scientific practices, I use my local knowledge of wild birds and trees in the campus grounds to get students outside (for awareness and to share the joy of identifying and observing wild birds and trees). There are times that I get to help and guide Grade 11 or 12 students whose research subject fall into ecology. One such student research is on diversity of avian population in the area (the students' video abstract can be viewed in this link: https://youtu.be/bNXBFXD_eNc).
    • Kimberly
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      kmichellehowell
      I have not done any citizen-science projects with learners yet. We have a strong STEM-Ag program at my school and we also study Monarch butterflies (all stages) through harvesting , observing, and releasing. It would be a great opportunity for the learners at my school to learn about birds and how they affect pollination and crops. It would involve observing birds in our pollinator and school gardens, and then observing them in other locations to see what conclusions we can make: feeding patterns, what they eat, birds that are helpful/harmful to crops, etc.
      • Maria (Dede)
        Participant
        Chirps: 74
        dpander37
        Butterflies are great for inquiry. One year, I ordered a bunch and their habitat, but it did not arrive until late in the year, and my school held all the packages until everything was dead.  It was horrible.  I hope you have better luck.
    • Russell
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      rfriedman1212
      I have not yet led any Citizen Science projects with my learners, however, I have run studies and projects within the local community at parks and natural areas, which could be viewed as a form of citizen science. Most recently, we have had our learners out in the field on a Milkweed & Monarch monitoring project. In groups, our learners locate and map out areas with milkweed present and then take note of any signs of Monarch activity (eggs, caterpillars, leaves that have been eaten, etc.) We are even hatching some of the Monarch eggs in a controlled environment and will release them as full grown adult. I feel this project can very much benefit global projects, such as Monarch Watch. We inspire our learners to ask questions about these animals as we have them observe the Monarch life cycle right in front of their eyes, thus creating more curiosity. When that curiosity is sparked there's a desire to help and become a part of something bigger. This sort of project would fall under such spotlights as Ecology & Insects.
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        AmySenn
        This makes me think that maybe I could look for ways to do a short, limited time part of a larger project so that students could have the experience of a being a citizen scientist without an ongoing, long term commitment. Thanks!
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Sci8Lilly
      The main citizen science project that are of my 8th grade students participate in is Project FeederWatch.  It has involved a bit of creativity over the years because my classroom is on the third floor.  For the past few years I have implemented a game cam to record the visitors to our feeders and then I prepare the photos for students to view and record their observations.  We also used the game cam to participate in eMammal to study our urban wildlife.  Journey North also has provided several different projects that my students participate in every year (except last year) which include the Symbolic Monarch Migration, Red Emperor Tulip Study, and Phenology to track the seasons.  I also introduce my students to Zooniverse which has a wonderful collection of projects to fit individual interests.  STC_0091
    • Catia
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      catiawolff
      I have not used a citizen project yet.  The Project Feeder Watch seems very interesting to me but the others are extremely appealing also.  I work in an alternative school with small class sizes so I would like to see what interests my students most.  Possibly have different groups work on different projects.  I see opportunities for cross curriculum (math, engineering, and science).  I find that I get the most out of students when they are involved in deciding what they are researching.  This year, for example, I had a student that decided to investigate a device called The Plant Choir.  Essentially, the plants would have a different electrochemical pathway which gets converted to music.  There were so many questions that came up.  The first being was, "Is it really measuring the plant or is it simply completing a circuit?"  The students realized that if a metal was used music was not created.  We began further asking questioning, "Would the music change if the same type of plant was tested under various conditions?" The way this project began with one student was his interest in another student's project of how plants communicate with one another.  He was studying how mycelium bricks were an alternative building material.
      • Maria (Dede)
        Participant
        Chirps: 74
        dpander37
        I like the idea of bird feeder watch too, but I have soo many squirrels, that it has been hard to keep them out of the bird feeders.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      pricenj
      I was part of a project that incorporated citizen science through the oceanography department at the UW.  Students collected water from different parts of the area and sent it in to be analyzed by the lab.  Then they received results and talked about the chemical compounds in the water, and how pollution was affecting water across Seattle.  One way that I think this project served the youth in the after school program was by making the project locally relevant.  Students collected water in their local community to understand what was happening in their own places.
    • Lori
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      MPBirding
      I have used both eBird and Celebrate Urban Birds with my 8th grade students. I really liked how Celebrate Urban Birds limited the number of birds that students were trying to identify and also only required them to go out 3 times to complete the study. This fit well into the amount of time that we had for the project and the students were able to make great observations. I really liked using Celebrate Urban Birds during Covid when students were making observations on our virtual days in their backyards. It brought up a lot of great questions and conversations about the types of birds seen based on location (town, wooded, open space, etc.).
    • Elandriel
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      elandriellewis
      I think some of these citizen science projects are accessible to early childhood teachers to do as whole classroom projects.  Some could be done as young as 2 years old.  I particularly like ebird as it allows for collecting data on the birds that you naturally see in your space.  I have a friend that works at a forest preschool (outdoors all day) and he uses it to really help focus on math with his kids.  He likes to help them figure out what birds they are seeing by classifying their characteristics.  The kids really like as the birds are engaging.  Many of our classrooms have bird feeders as well so I think feederwatch might be somethign fun to explore.  Many also do butterfly units, and several even have butterfly gardens, so I'd like to introduce them to the Monarch larvae monitoring project.  I think several other of the invertebrate projects could be engaging too as our curriculum has a whole unit on insects.  All of these though would need to be whole class and guided by the teacher.  Data can be collected and displayed in simple graphs and as exploration storylines - pictures of the students during the process.
    • Todd
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      CoreCyclones
      The introduction does a nice job of giving an overview of introducing the scientific method through inquiry and citizen-science. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) lists the steps (pp. 5) to carrying out an experiment of sorts to answer a research question based on what the "wonder" (pp. 11). Projects I would reconsider after reading this (as an introduction device to science research) would be to go out into the field and use their observations through a mindfulness exercise like closing their eyes and listening to the sounds around them. Record their observations as a map and keep a tally of the different noises they heard and infer what may be causing them. Students may be asked if they heard any bird noises. Did any sound familiar? If so, which do you think they were? Were there any noises that are new to you? We could discuss their data as a class and leave it with an "I Wonder" post-it that can be explored from there. From there students can be encouraged to do bird census surveys around the school and upload their data to a citizen-science database such as eBird.  They may be encouraged to track how natural phenomena such as weather conditions, time of day, etc., may be used to help explain the presence or absence of birds, or even bird behavior. From here, students may begin to create a research question they may be able to answer through previous literature, collected data and well-reasoned arguments..
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      Martha gardenbird
      In the classroom, I have used Penguin Watch from zooniverse.org with my students. The kids really like working with the photos, but sometimes it seems as if there are not enough photos to go around for all of my students (so we wait a week or two and try again!). Field trips (remember when we used to do those?) to a local TNC site was a great place to use iNaturalist, but I hear that Seek (app) might be more kid friendly and attempts to gamify nature watching by offering monthly challenges.   I am hoping this class will help me figure out how to start some long term project with my students. There is so little baseline data in existence about what birds or bugs (both are in the news with their declining numbers lately) are found on our campus or in the downtown area in general where my high school is. Perhaps this is to be done through iNaturalist and/or ebird.  
      • Sue
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        SueWatts
        Seek is wonderful for all ages (I love it for ID ing). I have an android phone and google lens is fantastic!
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        AmySenn
        I enjoyed looking at the zooniverse.org website-  I thought the highlights of the projects (pdf) looked interesting and maybe something I could use with kids (and not be on a computer).
    • Shelley
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Shelley_Metcalf
      Last summer with the help of a friend from a local zoo, we raised Monarch caterpillars.  She showed us how to find caterpillars on milkweed and care for them until their metamorphosis.  She also taught us to identify different varieties of milkweed and help her plant a new pollinator garden on her property.  I wish I would have known more about citizen science projects then, so we could have tagged our Monarchs to help with research. One of the reasons I chose to take this class was to learn more about citizen science because I think it’s the right next step for science in our homeschool.  We’re currently watching and learning about ants in our ant farm (thanks to my daughter’s wonderings about ants), so I think the School of Ants project might be a good first step into citizen science for us.  I’m also looking at Project Squirrel since we already do quite a bit of squirrel watching due to the high number of oak trees and squirrels on our property.
    • Darlene
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      DarleneKehn
      I have used GLOBE Clouds with students during the meteorology unit.  I am hoping to get involved with CoCoRahs next year once we get a stream gauge in a good spot on campus.  I really enjoy eBird and Feeder Watch and propose it to my students as a way to work on observation skills. I think the best way to get involved in projects is to do those that apply to the content you are teaching to give students a practical application of the scientific study.
    • Kate
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Mrs Studey
      I'm a bit of a fanatic when it comes to citizen science, and I try to incorporate it throughout the school year with my students. My school has a biodiversity project on iNaturalist where we keep track of plants and animals we see on our campus. We have also submitted data to the Southwest Monarch Study and Journey North, and we have tagged some monarch butterflies for release. A few of my students have submitted observations to the Great Sunflower Project (pollinator counting). With my after school club, we have participated in Project FeederWatch, Project NestWatch, and we have submitted observations through eBird. We are also part of the CoCoRaHS network, and we have a rain gauge installed in our school garden. One platform that I've only used a bit with my students is Zooniverse. I would love to do more with having students pick a project that interests them, do some work with it, and then reflect on what they learned about it. COVID has made it a bit more challenging to do some of these citizen science projects, but I'm looking forward to doing more next year.   I've found it's challenging to get students doing more of the work on different projects. Quite often, I end up being the one submitting the data because of restrictions for students being able to create their own accounts. You have to be careful which projects you pick depending on the grade level of the students. That's where SciStarter is so helpful because you can filter by age group. I find it is also helpful to have some kind of data sheet students can fill out so that they still get to practice collecting the data even if they're not the ones submitting it online. I only post one submission for the whole group, but everyone gets to collect data. Some projects (like FeederWatch) give you a data sheet to use, which is nice. Sometimes, I have students create their own data sheet because this gives them practice in deciding what information is important to collect. It also helps to explore projects on your own and test them out before doing them with the kids.
      • Austin
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        austinkennedy612
        Kate - Wow it's great to see that you have done so much citizen science projects with your students. I'm sure of all the options you've given them, everyone is able to grasp onto at least one that peeks their interest over time.
    • Pam
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      pkevans
      I have done Stream Discovery with my students. We visited our location in the fall and the spring and reported our results to the database. We were also able to contribute to some smaller studies to check on additional water quality each week in the spring. I have also used GLOBE Clouds. Kids love to look at clouds and are really good at it. It was cool to get an email saying that our observation matched up with a satellite. I will be starting CoCoRaHS monitoring this fall along with GLOBE atmosphere protocols. My biology students will be participating in crayfish monitoring project through IL SeaGrant in iNaturalist. I have introduced many of my students to eBird.
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      lumpydave84
      I myself am an eBird user.  The only citizen science program I ever tried to attempt with a class my first year of teaching AP Environmental Science was to have students document sightings of butterflies and moths using the Butterflies and Moths of North America website.  Being a NY school we start later in the year September and once school gets rolling butterflies and moths become a little more difficult to find and photograph.  Also verifying that students did the assignment was a little difficult.  I stopped doing it after that year.  After starting to be an iNaturalist user and the greater proliferation of smart phones I am interested in taking a stab at it once again.  I am here to learn more about integrating it into classroom!
    • Rachel
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      restendahl
      I take students out to a local wildlife refuge every Spring where we collect data for e-bird. Take students  water quality monitoring twice a year and collect the data and share with local agencies and tribes. I have used Project budburst in the past as well as working with a local nature center to do fish seines to collect data about forage fish populations in the area. And been involved in COASST a seabird stranding monitoring program and another marine debris/rope monitoring on ocean beaches program. Citizen science programs are so engaging for students, they are always so hands-on and can engage even reluctant science students. Citizen science projects are a great way to partner with local organizations and showcase local "green" jobs. Dive in!
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      mgerhardt
      Loon watch. Monarch tagging.  Cornell's Invasive Fish DNA. NYSDEC wave, backyard bird count,  Find something relevant in your area and get involved
    • Kristin
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      KristinBlack829
      I am very fortunate to work at public middle school with a lot of greenspace on our property. This past year, I did a Tree Journal with my kids. We visited the same stand of trees 10 times throughout the year (5 times in the fall, 5 times in the spring), conducted observations and answered questions relating to topics we were learning in class. While out there, I would use my personal Smartphone and iNaturalist account to record things my students observed. My school has a "Project" within iNaturalist that some other staff and I post to. My biggest hurdle is wanting the students be the ones to record the observations in iNaturalist. Not everyone has a SmartPhone. Even if they do, we have to be careful about recommending certain apps for personal download. I tried to have them take pictures and upload them to school-issued Chromebook to then load to iNaturalist through the website, but there we ran into privacy and security issues with that too. Seek by iNaturalist is also a great tool as well, but I struggle with how to use it in class when not everyone has a SmartPhone. I think I could incorporate some of the GLOBE programs into the tree journaling activity. I will have to look more into that and see if I can create a "class account" that they can record observations to. Another challenge I have is that I teach 5 classes each day, with over 100 students. I'll have to get creative with my planning, as I'm guessing a lot of these projects don't want 5 kids/groups reporting the same thing each day. I would love to see how I can use eBird with my students or start a FeederWatch program! I'm on the third floor, so that complicates being able to set a feeder up we can observe from inside.
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 16
        Sci8Lilly
        I am on the third floor of my school as well and so we are not close to the feeders.  I use a game cam to record the data for two consecutive days for Project FeederWatch.
      • Kristin
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        KristinBlack829

        @Linda That's a great idea Linda!  I will look into that!

    • Maria (Dede)
      Participant
      Chirps: 74
      dpander37
      I have had students collect soil samples as part of a citizen science project with the University of Oklahoma.  They were looking at different types of fungus found in local soil.  I found it interesting, but it took a long time for the University to post the online information about the soil samples once turned in, and they did  not provide much literature or support materials.  I would like to do more projects with students and citizen-science in the future, but I would like to have more time to prepare and have more support and support materials.
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      binouser
      I have not participated in a citizen-science project with my students before.  I often take a moment to talk about the birds that we spot on campus as we walk to recess or lunch.  I teach at an elementary school.  I can expand that activity and record the number and species we see.  I could have a student enter it as a classroom eBird account.  It will be a project we could continue to work on throughout the school year.
    • Bridget
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      BridgetL
      I have had my students participate in the Project FeederWatch with much success!  The students built their own bird feeders based on their own designs (taking into account need for a perch, area of hold food, etc.).  It does require the ability to have time available for students to build and rebuild when they find something that does not work.  Their observations of birds using their feeders was also interesting and varied.  Some students had never taken the time to notice the birds in their own backyards!  We even designed and hung a feeder that we could watch from the classroom window (helpful for those whose parents did not want to actually hand the feeder).  The students soon realized that birds are not the only creature that visited the feeder - we also had a squirrel that regularly visited whom the students lovingly named chubs.  Due to a change in my classroom location (second floor now!) I am planning on incorporating the Project BudBurst in the coming year.
    • Stephanie
      Participant
      Chirps: 33
      stephertan
      I've never really done a citizen science project with my learners. My husband is a secondary science teacher and he has worked with the GLOBE program before. I feel like I have a handle on how it will work, my only concerns are that my program is a one-day-a-week setup and I hope that we will be able to get a meaningful level of participation with so little contact time in a school year. In reflecting on the readings, I think citizen science will provide much needed relevance to our activities. It answers the question, "Why are we doing this?" from the get go and will no doubt engage my kiddos in our work even more than a "regular" activity. I have signed us up for the Feeder Watch program and I can't wait to get materials in hand and introduce this to my schools.
    • Austin
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      austinkennedy612
      Our program has done citizen science projects but not nearly to the extent that we would like. We currently have quite a few milkweed plants growing around the Zoo and we talk about pollinators and backyard ecosystems often. I would love to put together more workshops based in the phenology world and I think milkweed blooms and monarch migration would be a great place to start. The readings give a really good starter package for getting an activity up and running. The citizen spotlight on ecology and phenology is somethign I plan to do in the future. Being able to utlize the ideas in investigating evidence each lesson provides a back bone to a new workshop curriculum. Being at a Zoo we are lucky that we can utlize our resources (animals) right here up close to conduct research on. We are also fortuante enough to be on a mountainside Zoo so we can work within the native ecosystem to participate in citizen science projects in Colorado. I plan to utlize the Monarch Tracking program with my students to see if we can investigate how much milkweed we have on grounds and if it's suitable for the migration that comes through the space.
      • Todd
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        CoreCyclones
        Sounds like you have an ideal situation for exploring citizen-science projects.  I always noticed that birding near zoos is usually good. Wonder why that is. Milkweed projects are great too. In your experience, have you tried to sew milkweed from seeds?
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