• Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Yes, I often see Allen's Hummingbird hovering around native plants.  Occasionally, I see Anna's Hummingbird, although mostly males.  It is always a treat to see the female Anna's.
    • Jim
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Ruby Throated Hummingbird
      • Nicoline
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        Wow, that is so special! What kind of hummingbird is this and did you have to earn it's trust over time with feeding?
      • Jim
        Participant
        Chirps: 2

        @Nicoline I live in Virginia so the only hummer I have seen is Ruby Throated. I set up a camera with motion sensing and it came in to pose. It was a lucky but memorable picture.

    • Judy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Yes, I live in Central Florida. Starting in the end of March Ruby Throated Humminbirds return to my yard. I have two hummingbird feeders in my garden. I planted flowers specifically to attract them and enjoy watching them dart around  drinking from the feeders and flowers. They are amazing to watch and not afraid of me if I'm in the garden near the feeders. They hover watching me as if they are saying hello, then zip to the feeders. We get so much pleasure watching them!!
      • Vaughan
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I live in northwestern Florida and also enjoy the rubythroated hummers. They appear here in the spring--February and March-- and love the bottle brush trees. They stay here a very short time in the spring but return in September to stay 'til late October or November. One stayed for the entire winter, not sure of the species because it was a female. V
    • Maryann
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I have about 14 feeders out and I live near z Bolsa Chica Wetlands in CA. I get many Anna’ , Rufus, Calliope,and I have had a Costa.. I live on the 2nd floor and have a deck facing toward ocean(can’t see water)…I have potted plants but have really enjoyed figuring out the plants they like…they love salvia, some sage and anything with a funnel type flower! I try to keep a journal about when they come and go… I have at least 6 regulars, here all the time but in February and March I had 20/30 hummingbirds each day, especially at evening time..it is spectacular! The last 2 months it has been quiet with regulars but I know they will be back! I enjoyed the course!
    • Anita
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      The Ruby-throated Hummingbird is the primary species where I live, and I just had them return for this year on May 8. Within a couple of days, I noticed that a male and a female would both feed at either the same feeder or one on each of my two feeders, but another male would fly in and the two males would then engage in an aerial territory fight and chase each other away. For the last couple of days I have only observed one male coming to the feeders, but a female may still be around that I haven't noticed. I'm wondering if feeders in both the front and back yards would help support two male territories. Since they display such aggression, I wonder if resources within sight line of each other are enough to prompt aggression.
      • Maryann
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Hi, I have a lot of fighting, having 14 feeders in peak season, does help… I have poles set up about 12 feet apart with 4 feeders on each pole. The male will stack claim to all 4 feeders on a pole. He can’t protect each pole and he perched and guards his area! I also have 3 feeders in front of my sliding kitchen door about 20 ft across from all the other feeders… the birds that stay year round hang out here. it’s hilarious to watch when my beautiful CA Orioles come and make a feeder sway… these birds are big, like a blue bird size but bright yellow… the hummingbirds just fly around them, the big bird is shy!  It’s so much fun to watch!
    • Benji
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I have a friend who has two hummingbird feeders for their Ruby-Throated Hummingbird population. She finds that they tend to fight a lot over these feeders! I saw it myself too- they're very fast and beautiful. This course was really helpful in giving us an explanation as to why they do that! Does anyone know what we can do to try and relieve the territoriality of the birds? We just want everyone to get along and be peaceful, but it's understandable why they do what they do. We have two large feeders about 5 feet apart in length, I suggested maybe moving them farther apart by putting one further into the yard. We'll try anything, haha!
    • Jason
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Where I live there are Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds! They are a sight to see, with the male's beautiful red neck and the female's lush green back. Every once in a while one will come zipping up to my window hummingbird feeder and I can watch them drink the nectar. I hope to see one nesting soon! Thank you so much for this course!
    • Sarahy Contreras
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Thank you very much for the course; it is very nice, practical, and useful. I live in central-western Mexico, where there are 24 species of hummingbirds. I want to share a small guide I made with other colleagues about the species in these beautiful places. You can download the guide from the following link: chrome-extension://efaidnbmnnnibpcajpcglclefindmkaj/http://www.cucsur.udg.mx/sites/default/files/libro_colibries.pdf Another link: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/376378074_Guia_Ilustrada_Colibries_del_Centro_Occidente_de_Mexico_Autlan_de_Navarro_Jalisco_Centro_Universitario_de_la_Costa_Sur_Universidad_de_Guadalajara_96_pp_ISBN_978-607-581-067-6#fullTextFileContent   Captura de pantalla 2024-05-13 205657
      • Maryann
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Thank you!  You are so lucky to have so many! Maryann
    • Via
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      I've only seen three or four hummingbirds in my life. They have all been Ruby-throated Hummingbirds but seeing them is still amazing!
    • Claudine
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      DSC01205. I saw Ruby Throated Hummingbirds last year for the first time, when visiting my sister in Kentucky. I live in Thailand and we see a lot of sunbirds. They are beautiful but I must say that hummingbirds are very special
    • Jared
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Ruby-throated hummingbirds were a common site in our Connecticut backyard growing up, thanks to my mom's nectar feeders. Now in my late 30s I still find them absolutely dazzling. Their flight abilities alone are fascinating to watch. But I had my most spectacular hummingbird experience in May 2022, visiting Los Angeles for the first time. Our first day there, my girlfriend and I took a walk around the Hollywood reservoir in the late afternoon. The air was positively thick with hummers, buzzing all around in the sunshine, right over our heads, zipping from flower to flower, letting out their little peeps. It was a peak experience, one of those truly ecstatic moments, which only nature can provide.
    • Here in southern Oklahoma the annual return of hummingbirds is a big deal to even non-birders. Each spring a large variety of feeders become available to purchase at local stores, even grocery stores! All summer practically every yard has at least one feeder, and first of the season sightings of the little birds are announced on social media. Most are Ruby-throated, and so far, that is the only species I have seen at my feeders. But reports of Black-chinned are becoming more common, so maybe I will see one this summer!
    • Rose
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      We only have ruby-throated hummingbirds here in northern Illinois, but I've had great luck attracting them with cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis) and bee balm (Monarda fistulosa). I have pots of annual red salvia, cuphea and petunias and they love those too!
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      When I was a young girl growing up in Madison Wisconsin (60+years ago), I came out to the yard one frosty May morning and found a Ruby Throated hummingbird on the ground.  It was near a bush by the side of the house. This was early spring, but even in Wisconsin we can have frosts up until late May.  I assumed the bird was dead.  I placed it in the palm of my hand, it felt nothing, no weight, no warmth , no movement.  As I was puzzling over it's beautiful plumage, it suddenly stirred. In an instant it revived and zipped away into the bushes. My heart was beating faster then it's as I ran to tell my parents.  In the Eastern United states we typically see only the Ruby throated hummingbird.  That Magical moment hooked me on hummers.  I now have enjoyed the wonder of seeing over 210 species of hummingbirds. The inspiration on that cool morning was life inspiring.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I come in contact with a lot of Anna's Hummingbirds as a volunteer at a Wildlife Hospital. The babies are very eager eaters and the adults are very entertaining. Our goal is to rehabilitate and release back to the wild, and the Anna's are my favorite to work with.
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Yes! We have Ruby throated hummingbirds in the NE where I live. Also, I have seen a Black chinned in FL and a Ruby topaz and Blue tailed emerald in Aruba. I am hoping to travel west soon to see more!
    • Another favorite hummingbird story of mine occurred at the retail store I work at in Ohio.  When I came in everyone wanted me to evict the poor hummingbird that nobody else could corral.  I went up to the corner it was in on a ladder and held my hand by it.  It went right in my hand without fuss.  I took it outside and gently laid it on a bush.  After a minute it flew off.
    • I have been able to see quite a few species traveling.  The Broad-tailed Hummingbird is a favorite of mine due to it's "metallic trilling in flight".  Another one I saw that I wish I had taken a better look at was at home in Central Ohio on my American Beech tree on Halloween.
    • Kate
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Yes, in Michigan we only see Ruby Throated Hummingbirds. Last year, they loved the salvia we planted for them as well as flox and the feeders. They will buzz behind us as we sit outside eating dinner! When the feeder gets low, they will stare into the dining room window until I run out with a refill!
    • Pamela
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Where I live in Indiana the Ruby-throated Hummingbird is our only resident.  We feed them sugar water from May until September when they migrate.  We have seen the tiny nest on our property. When we traveled to Arizona, Oregon and California we saw several other species including Anna's, Rufous, Rivoli and Allen's.
    • Cristina
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Yes, on a trip to Brazil, at Bonete's beach (Sao Paulo): the Black Jacobin and the Saw-billed Hermit! It was great and I was able to get some images of them (and other birds) with my phone. Here's a small video I made: https://vimeo.com/784014918
    • Peter
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Here on the southern tip of Vancouver Island, I've only seen Anna's Hummingbirds. However, they stay with us year-round, presumably because of the fairly mild climate. We do get snow occasionally and have to be extra vigilant with the feeder, refilling should it freeze. This animated GIF only hints at the urgency of refueling on a rare snow day in February 2021. Anna's Hummingbird Feeding in a Snow Storm 2021-02-13
    • Earlene
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Yes.  Living in Southwest Virginia, USA, we get Ruby Throated hummingbirds from about April to September, depending on the weather.  I have a feeder handing outside my kitchen window and enjoy watching them while eating my meals.  They are one of the highlights of the summer.
    • Lorena
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I have the privilege to see hummingbirds everyday in my garden. I live in Guatemala, and my garden is a little paradise: azure-crowned, white-eared, Rivoli´s, berylline, rufous sabrewing, mexican violetear, and my favorite, sparkling-tailed hummingbird. And I wait every september to welcome ruby-throated hummingbird.
    • Tam
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I have seen a few hummingbirds in California and Arizona. One common bird  was the Anna’s Hummingbird near a stream within a woodland area in California.