• JD
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      The Olympic peninsula has Annas year round and Rufous in the summertime.  The last two winters were really cold and were really hard on our hummers.
    • Ellen
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Calliope and Rufous in MT. Anna's, Costa's, Black-chinned in CA. Ruby-throated and a vagrant Broad-billed in NC. Giant in Peru. Rufous-tailed in Costa Rica. Several of these are featured in this course.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Ruby-throated hummingbirds in FL Calliope hummingbird in UT Black-chinned hummingbird- UT Rufous hummingbird-CO Broad-tailed hummingbird-UT Looking forward to seeing many more.
    • I have seen almost 30 species of Hummingbirds. Most of them (11 species) have been from several trips to Colombia. I am originally from Puerto Rico where I was raised looking at some endemic hummingbirds. Living in the USA I have seen 8 species. In total I have seen 11 species of the ones featured in the course.
    • Merry
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I have ruby throated in my backyard near Boston, MA.  They can be fierce!  What sparked my interest though was as a schoolgirl visiting the natural history museum in Tring, England. They had about 200 or 300 specimens, plus some nests and eggs.  Obviously these were not live, which is what you asked about, but I’ve never forgotten the marvel.
    • Lindsay
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Yes! Ruby throated hummingbird in Houston! I was over the moon. Come to zinnias in my butterfly garden - but didn’t stay.
    • Geraldine
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I live in Colorado and I’ve seen the Rufous and Broad-tailed Hummingbirds, particularly when I go hiking.  I am thinking about putting up a hummingbird feeder; however, haven’t so far.  Enjoying the course so far.
    • Sally
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The reason I'm taking this course is because I have Ruby Throated Hummingbirds every year and I want to know more about how they can possibly migrate so far, are they same ones every year, and also what predators exist.  So far, the range and diversity we're learning about in the rest of the world (I live in the Northeast) is fascinating!
    • Gillian
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Ruby throated hummingbirds only, as I live in NJ.  I choose not to but out a feeder and instead plant flowers and bushes in which hummers and butterflies love.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I live in NE PA and have been watching and feeding Ruby-throated  Hummingbirds for years. It's so exciting when they first show up!
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      We are staying in Rhinebeck, NY this July and I am seeing Ruby-throated hummingbirds on the Scarlet bee balm flowers sipping nectar. They are so fun to watch and after learning about iridescence (had to look up the spelling!) we looked at it from a different perspective! We are in Florida most of the year and I have the prepared syrup in my fridge and am afraid to use it to feed the hummingbirds. Someone told me you have to be careful in Florida with the heat and bacteria etc. Is it okay to have a hummingbird feeder in SW FL?
    • Robert
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      There are nine groups of hummingbirds based on genetic similarities.  I have looked all over the Cornell website for the definition of 'group' but cannot find anything. I'm not the best researcher and fault my research skills.  Can someone tell me what the definition of group is and where can I find it?  Thanks
      • Do I understand your question correctly?  I think you mean: Kingdom, order, family, genus, species, but what is group?  I am a fellow student, but I think it means 9 groups of similar birds within the species Colubris. KINGDOM Animalia ORDER Apodiformes (swifts & hummingbirds) FAMILY Trochilidae (hummingbirds) GENUS Archilochus SPECIES (specific epithet) colubris
      • Paul
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        I think that "group" is loosely defined here; I assume you are referring to the 9 groups listed early on in this section (Bees, Emeralds, etc.). I do not think that there is an official definition of "group".  It seems that the 9 groups are based on genetic similarities. The video clip list some characteristics of these groups, though does not provide any strict definitions (e.g., what makes a "bee" a "bee" and how does it differ from an "emerald").  That may be hard to do at this point, since the groupings are based on genetic similarities rather than strict similarities in how they look. Ideally these groups would coincide with specific GENUS names.  It seems that this might be the case for the small groups (Jacobyn, Topaz, and Giant Hummingbird groups), but there are way more hummingbird genera (plural of "genus") than the listed "groups" (106 versus 9).  So the groups appear to be just a convenient way to organize the large number of species.
    • I have been putting out nectar feeders for out ruby-throated hummingbirds here in southeastern Pennsylvania for a number of years. The funniest thing I ever saw was a juvenile wren who landed on the support for the nectar feeder and looked in absolute wonder at the hovering hummingbird feeding!
    • Denise
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I believe an Anna's Hummingbird spent most of the winter at my feeder here in Seattle WA- Went through a lot of sugar to keep the feeder full. Now that the flowers are in bloom I have only seen it a few times.  I didn't know how territorial they were till other hummingbirds  came to the feeder and were "sent " away by the resident hummingbird.
    • I will never forget the first time I saw a hummingbird. I was in my 40s and visiting family in the suburbs of Philadelphia. Suddenly, what I thought was a large insect went lightning fast zig-zagging across their property.  I was overcome with joy as I realized that’s not an insect, that’s a hummingbird! THAT’S A HUMMINGBIRD!
    • Penny
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Yes.  We have a lot of ruby throated hummingbirds in Maine and we put up feeders and actually see what we call the hummingbird wars.  They often come close to me and my husband if we have on a colorful article of clothing.   We also have what we thought were migrators in Florida but this year I left my feeders up until they stopped coming and they didn't until spring.  Is that ok or should we encourage them to go farther south? My husband also plants a lot of hummingbird friendly flowers and when we see them liking a particular kind, he plants more of those.
    • Robert
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Ruby throated hummingbird and Rufous hummingbird
    • Brian
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I live in MA, and have seen the ruby throated hummingbirds occasionally over the years. A local friend and his wife have red flowering plants on their deck, with hummingbirds being so common there, they can feel like very large bees buzzing during early summer evening get togethers. This year, I put out a feeder for the first time, and it has been enjoyable watching them, more enjoyable than almost any other birds. From limited observations and no birding cam; Females have been at the feeder 90% of the time Females have been more aggressive in bumping others away from the feeder Females have perched while feeding more than males, who are more likely to feed while hovering They have sometimes hung out perching for a while, rubbing their bills on the feeding structure, shaking their tail feathers, looking around, and often going back for more. It was surprising that they appeared so relaxed to perch for an extended time, and I was sure if that was because there are hydrangea bushes close by with very similar green coloring, or if they are so fast and quick that they aren't concerned with others. It would be great to get any feedback on this. This first section of the course has been illuminating and exciting. Looking forward to the rest of it, and opportunities to see more species in the future.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      The hummingbird that stands out to me that I have seen this year is blackhead with maroon gorget and white belly.  It is so pretty.  I have not; that I know of seen it featured in these lessons but I am in the Eastern side of the US.  Only been able to view the three different ones for about two weeks with this being July.  the other two; one is mostly green and the other is a mostly light grey.  These last two come and go quickly but the white and black will hover longer giving me a better look.  Last year was the first year I put out the nectar (homemade) so I am hoping to get more species and colors each year.  For those that have been doing this for years I have a question.  Last year my feeder was in my back yard and I put it back there again this year.  I bought another feeder and have put it near a window in my front yard.  It has only been a day but so far they have not seemed to have found it.  Question is do you think they will find it or should I just put it in their paths near the one on the back side?   Thnx for any feedback.  I'm sure the white black red is a ruby throated hummingbird just I don't believe I seen it in the lesson as that color. Mary  
      • Margaret
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        HI, my experience is that the hummingbirds will find the location of your new feeder although it may take a few days for them to check it out. Give them time and have fun seeing all they do!
      • I put my first feeder on our front porch, where I can see them at dinner.  I get loads of teasing for “staring” just over my nephew’s left shoulder at dinner!  We put another out back and the came to that one too.  Any luck yet with your second feeder?
    • Yes! I see two hummingbird species on a regular basis when I go on short walks or long hikes in my area. These species are the Anna's Hummingbird and the Rufous Hummingbird, which I learned in this lesson are considered to be in the hummingbird genetic group called Bee.
    • Debbie
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I live in Central Illinois and Ruby-Throated Hummingbirds are common here.  I plant flowers on my front deck that attract them every year and also keep hummingbird feeders out.  They are endlessly entertaining to watch!
      • I haven't got the chance to experience the Ruby-Throated Hummingbird yet, but I look forward to seeing them in the future! I agree that hummingbirds are entertaining to watch.