The Cornell Lab Bird Academy Discussion Groups Joy of Birdwatching Activities: Bird ID Practice

    • Marietta Isabel
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1.-   I see 2 birds eating bananas, they are together,  I think they have a nest. One is black and red, the other is kind of orange with beige. Tanager   2.-I can identify a mirlo, a dove, tanager   3.- Lots of flycatcher. Great kiskadee, looking for bugs on the ground 4.- Often I see a Blue crowned motmot.  He is tall, not small as the picture. he like the low branches to look for food.  A beautiful blue crown on his head, green and bright blue with a long tail, round at the end.
      • Robert
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        I was in Belize at the end of February. We saw many birds. The blue crowed Motmot,Scarlet rumped Tanager,Black headed Trojan,Brown Jays,Chakalacas,Anthrush,Lieated wood Pecker, Golden fronted woodpecker,Pale billed wood pecker, yellow headed Parrots, Red Lored Parrot, a couple of different hawks different kinds of herons along the river and a crazy little bird doing a mating dance on the forest floor after he’s cleaned all of the leaf litter away and many more. Today in my yard and at  my feeders in Northern California I’ve seen Purple house finches, Oak Titmouse, Bewicks Wren, California Tohahee, Black Phoebe, Chestnut Chickadee, Mourning Doves, Anna’s Hummingbird, Female Hooded Oriole. Are you in Belize?
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I was looking at the live cam at Sapsucker Woods.  I was able to distinquish a common grackle from the European starling.  Their shape is so similar but that shiny dark blue on the grackle helped.  I used the Merlin app to assist.  I already love it. There were also male and female cardinals, chickadees, a tufted titmouse (looked that one up), and lots of red-winged black birds.  Fun.
    • Deanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      1. I saw 2 Mourning Doves and Chickadees. Easy to spot the differences by size, color, and their shape. 2. Three different birds this morning, same colors: Robin, Mourning Doves, Wild Turkey. The robin looked a darker brown, easy to know it due to the orange belly, the Turkey was easy to ID due to it's size, though i did second guess was it a pheasant? Used the Merlin ID and due to the brown patch above the tail feathers was able to tell it was a Wild Turkey. The doves easy to know the difference, one thing i did learn via the lesson were the spots on their wings, i never noticed spots on Mourning Doves before. 3. Three birds searching for food, same as #2, Robin, Mourning Doves, and the Wild Turkey. All three were foraging on the ground. The Doves were savaging seed on the ground by the bird feeder, the Turkey was out in the grassy area as were the robins. 4. My favorite bird is the Pileated Woodpecker. Easy to distinguish by it's large size, as well as the black and white coloring along with the brilliant red hood. Mourning Dovesfemale wild turkeychickadee gray outer tail feathers
    • Rachel
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Activity 4:  My favorite, the mourning dove is larger than a robin, with a small head, beige-ish belly and dark spots on it's wings.  When not nibbling on millet, they are resting on the telephone wire or a tree branch as their soft coo coo wafts through the yard.
    • michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I have a nesting pair of Oregon Dark-eyed Juncos underneath my deck. This bird is sparrow-sized with white outer tail feathers  and likes to forage on the ground for seeds that fall from the feeder in our pear tree.
      • Deanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        I never heard of a Junco before, do you have photos? Neat that you have them nesting so close to you!
    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      1: I saw a Downy Woodpecker and a Golden-crowned Sparrow.  The woodpecker was feeding at a suet/seed feeder, vertically oriented.  The sparrow was feeding on the ground beneath the suet/seed feeder, hopping around with other Golden-crowned Sparrows.  2: I saw a Tree Swallow, a Barn Swallow, and a Western Bluebird with blue the predominant color.  The Tree Swallow has a blue back, and hood, a short tail with a white underbody.  The Barn Swallow has a blue back with a rufous underbody and a long forked tail.  The Western Bluebird is a male with brilliant blue areas on the head, back and wings with rufous patches on the wings and upper chest.  3:  The Tree and Barn Swallows were feeding in the air on flying insects.  The Western Bluebird was feeding from the ground on small green worms and also flying insects it flew to from perches to catch.  4:  The Western Bluebird is a small to medium size songbird with brilliant blue markings and rufous patches on the wings and chest that feeds from the ground and from perches.  The bluebird feeds in open fields with trees, fences, and overhead telephone lines to perch on.  This time of year they sometimes look for nest boxes and carry dried grasses from the ground to the nest box which is what I'm currently observing in the Pacific Northwest.
      • Deanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        Thanks for sharing, can you put up pictures? especially of your nesting boxes? I'm interested in how you did it, how high up off the ground, etc. Thanks!
    • Emily
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      1: I saw a junco and a robin. The robin had a much rounder shape to it than the junco. It also appeared to have a smaller head than the junco, but that may be because of the junco's black hood. 2: I saw three birds with red on different parts of their bodies. The robin has a red belly, while the Purple Finch is red all over! The Towhee had a little bit of red on its sides. I got to use the Merlin app to identify the Purple Finch and the Towhee, which I originally thought was a junco. 3. I saw my robin foraging on the ground, using its beak. The Purple Finch was at a feeder. I saw a hummingbird (not sure what kind) flitting around near a pine tree.
      • Deanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        Thanks for sharing, i'm learning a lot. I thought i saw some "rare" little red bird, same here, looked it up "purple" finch. you must be in a warmer climate than i am (I am in Wisconsin) We don't have hummingbirds yet.