The Cornell Lab Bird Academy Discussion Groups Joy of Birdwatching Activities: Different Seasons, Different Birds

    • Vicki g
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      I have been engaged in the alternate activity of learning to use a hand me down camera to take bird pics to review/edit later and be able to confer with others for what I cannot identify. yesterday I observed a lone adult breeding snowy egret, mingling in a harbor with the Canada Geese that were assembled there (about 10 or so - just one couple with a gosling. Thanks to the camera, my friend later confirmed two American Black Ducks which I didn't have the experience to feel secure about when I had seen them in the same spot some time ago. I am slowly getting used to the great variation of appearances in stages of life and seasons - this was brand new information for me. So I think, although I will peruse my bird books and the online resources for a few birds related to this exercise, I seem to do best digging deeper with whatever bird(s)  I have observed during the day.  however I am thrilled that we are an area that gets a lot of migrating birds, and now having joined a birder facebook page (and bird club when it starts meeting again), and thanks to the Cornell rare bird e-alert (which then also shows me what other birds people are listing, I am attuned to what is blowing into town. IMG_8255
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Activity 1: I couldn't search for birds in the "ebird Status and Trends" area. It kept telling me "nothing found". Any one else have that issue? Activity 2: Birds that live year round in my area are: Canada Goose (seen); Mallard (seen); and, Barrows Goldeneye (seen).  Birds that live part of the time are: Common Loon (seen); Dusky Grouse (seen); and, osprey (seen). Activity 3: In summer, the Goldfinch is a brighter yellow and has a black marking on its forehead.  The difference between a summer and winter Common loon in striking! I had no idea. The summer loon has green color on its head and neck, vivid black and white pattern on its back - to mention only a few.  By contrast, the winter loon is a dull buff/white/grey with little or no markings. Only their tell tale shape lets me know these are the loons I'm used to seeing. Activity 4: It's mid-May and most if not all of my "most likely birds" are around.  The ones I could expect to see i 6 months are year round birds such as Northern Harrier, Sharp Shinned Hawk, Golden Eagle, Cooper's Hawk. Bald Eagle, Red Tailed Hawk.  I couldn't find birds that are only here in the winter. I live in western Canada.
    • STUART
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Activity 1: Northern Cardinal pretty Eastern US centric and stationary year round, Blackburnian Warbler clearly east coast S to N coastal run but appears to hug in to land mass yet possible overwater run along Mexican coast. Western and Scarlet Tanagers appear to hold a clear line of demarkation in South America but live close next door then Western heads up along the coastal land mass while the Scarlet takes a turn east with a large over water pass in the Gulf before spreading out on its approach to Northern America favoring the east. Ruby Throated Hummers spread out on the East but I was interested in the sitings in Florida throughout the winter.  Some are at home there. The Sandhill Crane loves the interior CONUS run clearly. The Flycatcher has an interesting pass up and down with what appears to be a long run with no stopover even thought they are over land, or at least no sitings in the day on the ground are reporting. Activity 2: All year:  Eastern Towhee is indicated as observed in my region year round but I have not seen one. House Finch is very common and ofter robs our Blue Bird nest boxes.  Cedar Waxwing is reported but I will keep searching. Part Year: We are on a water way so many ducks and geese pass our way but I selected the Barn Swallow, frequents our porch with a messy nest and but its aerial performance catching insects over our pasture is incredible. Eastern Whip-poor-will is indicated a here but not widely seen. When I was a child heard it every night in the summer but rarely now.  We lost many Northern Bobwhite over the years due to hedgerow removal but not they are returning in low numbers but they are here now in May. Activity 3: The American Goldfinch is an amazing color transition show at our feeder. The covert markings etc. stay relatively constant but of course the striking yellow overtakes the winter brown right before your eyes. I have not seen a Loon here but the images really show that shape is most important in maintaining ID during winter months. The beautiful color definition is washed out in the winter when the attraction has lost its importance, but wow is it sensational in breeding regalia! Activity 4: I am fortunate that my favorite birding spot lies on our 400 acre family farm along the middle Potomac River Virginia side.  I expect to see or hear over 53 species in the Spring and early Summer months. I can't claim this collection of observations as my own as my Audubon team came and assembled it for me.  The changing landscape now is revealing Osprey who returned pretty much on time in late March, passing Northern Harriers and I was lucky to see the Red Breasted Grosbeak this year which is only a brief visitor. From this lesson I am searching now for the Blackpoll Warbler that should be passing through now and other Warblers known to pass but not seen often.
    • Nicole
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      American Red-start? DSCN4252 DSCN3396 Great Blue Heron
      • Aaron
        Participant
        Chirps: 16
        Yes that is a female American Redstart.
    • Nicole
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      1. It is really very interesting to see the migration paths and patterns that each bird takes. The northern cardinal, as a whole stays in the same regions (cover a good part of north America) pretty much throughout the entire year whereas the western blackburnian warbler covers a huge territory range from south America to Canada but resides in a small territory during non-migration season. The scarlet tanager’s territory range is much smaller when it in the southern regions but expands quite a bit when it goes north and becomes more plentiful. Whereas, the western tanager really stays to the west, closer to the coast only. A small percentage of the ruby hummingbirds remain in Florida throught the year, the others head northeast (North America). While the Rufous stays by the west coast only, whether its south for the winter or up north during the summer. The sandhill crane’s population stays condensed in the winter months; some stay in Florida but during the summer their “home turf” is quite vast.  And the yellow-bellied flycatcher is also much more condensed in the winter in Central America and heads north skipping the southeast US but on its trip back south does spend time there. 2. Year round I see mallards, mourning doves and red-bellied woodpeckers (Westchester, NY). Whereas some of our part-time visitors are the Green Heron which I saw for the first time near home just yesterday, the ruby-throated hummingbird and the dark eyed junco. The dark-eyed junco is our winter resident and so does the reverse commute. 3. During the winter or cooler months the birds’ feather colors are not nearly as vibrant as they are in the warmer months, especially mating season. The duller hues may also help them camouflage. And as is typically the case the males are the more colorful of the pair but may look a lot more like their female counterparts in the “off season”. Many times juveniles look similar as well making it sometimes hard to distinguish who is who. 4. Since this is my first real season paying close attention to my bird neighbors I am still learning who I will typically see during this time. I learn about a new bird in my area multiple times a week- even more with this class. I can’t wait to really put on my looking glasses as the seasons change and the birds reverse commute in the fall. There is something new to see and learn every day!! DSCN4613
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      Different Seasons Different birds: Better shot of suspected Palm WarblerP3290383
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      Activity 4, Different Birds Different SeasonsThe easiest spot for me to observe birds is my back porches both in MA and FL. Florida changes in subtle ways over the 7 months or so that I stay here.  If I look out 100 meters there is a tall pine tree in the middle of a park that has a commanding view of the field underneath and around it.  There, I see mostly birds that are year round dwellers and mostly larger birds.  From cowbirds and grackles (who populate the supermarket parking lot I use), to Bald Eagle and hawks of which I have identified Coopers Hawk (shown below) and Bald Eagle. I also see Red Tail and Ospreys and Swallow Tale Kite fly as there is a river next to the field and quite a bit of assorted prey like squirrel sand rabbits and song birds that feed on the shrubs and grasses (and their bugs) in the park.Coopers Hawk side2 In the few years we have lived there I have also seen numerous small birds that sometimes are numerous in the trees, and sometimes not.  Merlin helped me identify this years photographable birds.  I got a 2X tele extender to magnify my 150 mm lens and caught three transient warblers.  Black and White Warbler was easily identified along with a great crested flycatcher who might be year-round.  Two other likely candidates are shown below.  I think one is a Palm Warbler the other is a Yellow Rumped Warbler.yellow warbler rear view? warbler-yellow? Warblers are hard.  I need to take a whole course on them and get the associated calls implanted in my head if I want to get better at them.  I have recorded several songs but found no sound identifiers that work for birds like Shazam does for recorded human music.  If anyone has a good song identifier for birds let me know.  I am using Merlin to guess and listen and it is not great.
    • Julie
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Activity 2 - Using Merlin, three species that I see often that are here year round are the House Sparrow, the American Crow, and the Mourning Dove. Not very exotic, I know! The Cedar Waxwing is only here during the non breeding part of the year, and I have seen those here, very beautiful. Have not yet found two others that are here seasonally - will keep looking!
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I perused the migration site and was interested to see the sandhill cranes patterns, and the great variety of areas they go to.  I saw some this year for the first time and wondered about their migratory patterns.  I did not know they mainly migrated at night! We need to advocate for birds in our communities.
    • Julie
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Lesson 1 - When I look at the maps for the birds in lesson 1, I see this: Northern Cardinal - some seasonal variation, but primarily stays in the lower mid-west and southeastern U.S throughout the year.  The Blackburnian Warbler - does a huge migration from lower South America in the winter months, north through the United States and up to Canada in the summer months. Scarlet Tanager- Winters in southern South America, and travels through the southern U.S. up through the eastern mid west to southern Canada for the summer months.  The Western Tanager - winters in Central America and Mexico, then migrates through the Western U.S. up to western Canada for the summer. That's why the are called Western...I should see these in my neighborhood for the next few months - I will keep an eye out! Ruby-throated hummingbird - Also winters in Central America and Mexico, then travels through the entire western U.S. when migrating, reaching Southern Canada.   The Rufous Hummingbird - winters in the western part of Central America and Mexico, then sticks to the west coast when migrating up to north west Canada. Also in my neighborhood this time of year! The Sandhill Crane - spends the winter in Texas and Florida and the Indiana/Michigan area. Also in parts of California, I then does a complete migration up through the mid-west predominantly, with some members of the species reaching Alaska and northern Canada in the summer. Although some remain around the Great Lakes and other areas. The Yellow-Bellied Fly Catcher winters in Central America, then seems to fly across the Gulf of Mexico starting late spring, around May, through Texas to the Great Lakes Region, and into New England and Eastern Canada for the summer. How did each species determine its path? This is fascinating.
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I always see Cardinals, Carolina Chickadees & Tufted Titmouse at my feeders but recently I have been visited by 3 new birds that I’ve never seen in my yard before: a female Common Yellowthroat (photo; ID by Merlin), a Black & White Warbler and several Ovenbirds  The Yellowthroats live year round in Florida (I will be looking out for them now!) but the Black & White Warbler is only in Florida during the winter & Ovenbirds were migrating. 93BCDAD9-B9D6-4067-BA3C-B32C34FCE67A
    • susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      The birds I see year round, to name a few, include Black-capped Chickadee, House Spaarows, House Finches, Northern Cardinals. The ones I noticed lately that migrated in are the Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Baltimore Oriole and Gray Catbird.  The Grosbeak and Orioles arrived at the same time.  There was a male and a female Grosbeak and 3 male and 1 female Oriole in the yard for a couple weeks.  I have not seen them for 4 days now.  This happens every year.  They come for a couple weeks, then I don’t see them.   I live in the city, with a small lot but have a lot of trees and understory vegetation. What environment do these birds need to breed? After the Grosbeak and the oriole leave, the Gray Catbird showed up in the yard.  I live in Wisconsin along Lake Michigan, the map shows that the Gray Catbird is a year round resident along the lake, but I usually only see it in the yard in spring.
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Most of the birds I see in my area now are usually there year round but here are a few that will migrate. I don't actually see most of these, however. The Golden-crowned sparrow is here now but will leave in the summer. The Bufflehead leaves now and returns in the fall. The Lincoln's sparrow leaves for the summer and returns in the fall. We have a lot of Violet Green Swallows now but they will leave for the winter as well as the Common Yellowthroat and the Black-headed Grosbeak. I've never see the last two mentioned nor the Bufflehead but would like to search for them.
    • Mary Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Activity 2 - Westchester, NY Year-round: Red-bellied Woodpecker, Blue Jay, Black-capped Chickadee Visitors: Yellow-rumpled Warbler, Scarlet Tanager, Baltimore Oriole Activity 3 Male Goldfinch: Winter- drab brown colors, Summer- bright yellow Common Loons: Winter- partial collar, brownish, Summer- bright collar and checkered-board back Activity 4 - Croton Point Park, Westchester, NY A birding hotspot Using ebird.org, today(May 15th), some of the species seen are: Purple Martin Canada Greece Least Flycatcher Blue-headed Vireo Northern Rough-winged Swallow European Starling Gray Catbird Swainson ‘s Thrush Yellow Warbler Chestnut-sided Warbler Indigo Bunting   and much more! A lot of these will not be here in the winter- purple martins, warblers, Indigo Bunting!!!  
    • Mary Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Hi - Activity One Northern Cardinal with Blackburnian Warble- Really interesting to use the animated abundance maps. Cardinals are around here (NY) all year while the Blackburnian  Warbler leaves to go back home to South America. Scarlet Tanager with Western Tanager- the Scarlet only migrates on the east coast while the Western Tanager stays on the west coast. Ruby-throated Hummingbird with Rufous  Hummingbird - another surprise- east vs west coast migrations Sandhill Crane with Yellow-bellied Flycatcher- both birds migrate much further north than the others mentioned. The Sandhill Crane mostly moves thru the middle of the country, while the Yellow-bellied Flycatchers seem to the be more eastern. The Sandhill Cranes go all the way up to Alaska.
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Before this course I used to wonder why Cardinals were so often pictured in the snow on Christmas cards. Now I know why, they hang around all year! I have found this lesson on migration and viewing the animated migration maps to be fascinating. One of my favorite months to be outdoors is October and yet I now see from the Migration map that many birds are no longer around in the US, having already headed south. I will keep that in mind when I am in the outdoors in a few months. I had no idea about the changing colors of the feathers either. It will make identifying the birds more challenging later in the year when their colors are more muted. All the more reason to learn to identify the birds by their songs and calls.
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      P3290383Palm Warbler P3220368 Black and With WarblerP2050242 Yellow-rumped Warbler? Different Seasons, Different Birds, Activity 2, Some who stay and some who only visit. I am a “snowbird”.  I have been a Florida resident for last 7 years who stays here in the winter and journeys north to MA for 5 months in the summer. I noticed this year that my Live Oak trees right outside my lanai were full of small birds in Jan-March time frame but a little more-empty now that it is May.  I looked through my pictures and also looked through the very long list Merlin provided to me and now better understand the reason.  Some of the birds I found in the Warbler family were in the migration window when I saw them .  They included a Palm Warbler, a Black and White Warbler and a Yellow Rumped Warbler or Common Yellowthroat.  All show a presence in February and March and an absence in May With the abundance of water and aquatic food, we have a wide variety of wading and fishing birds.   The Great egret (my favorite) actually has a migrating population and a static population.  I know Canada Geese have similar migrating and non migrating groups. Hence I can see Great Egrets all the time I am in FL and most of the time in MA.  They seem to frequent a large portion of North and South America.  It is hard from the animations in e-bird to see where the summer population in Massachusetts actually comes from.  Most of my good bird books are in MA so I will have to do some digging to understand migration paths. One of the birds I see only rarely is the White Pelican (no good pictures) ..  I have seen them in Ding Darling refuge on Sanibel and occasionally when fishing in Bonita Bay.  E-bird shows a more complete picture of migration from concentrations in FL and more sparsely Mexico to South America in the winter and up the Mississippi valley to a broad part of the northern US, especially around the Great Lakes.  Getting to know Merlin and e-bird has made it a lot faster to both identify and explore about birds than my long term reliance on field guides.  Having participated in the Digital Revolution myself, I appreciate the immense improvements in information access for the birds.
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      P5110053 These cardinals probably stay in my neighborhood all year.  They couple for life from my reading and are the species most likely to be able to photograph the male and female together around here.   Different Seasons Different Birds, Actvity 1, compare migrations of selected pairs Northern Cardinal with Blackburnian Warbler Northern Cardinal has a very static range.  There are minor fluctuations around the fringes and within the main body of the population in the eastern 2/3 of the USA.  There are also populations in southern CA, Nevada, Mexico (mostly coastal) and out into the Gulf coastal extensions of central America. Blackburnian Warbler is a long migrator who moves from the tropical highlands of the northern parts of South America (south of where the Cardinal winters in what looks like somewhat cooler regions). And flies largely north of the heartland of the Cardinal’s range.  They appear to overlap only in the summer in central to northern New England in the hillier parts of that region. I can recommend a summer drive on route 100 through the middle of Vermont if you want to see some beautiful country and have a chance to see both birds. Scarlet Tanager with Western Tanager Scarlet Tanager and Western Tanager do an East West split on the United States.  Their summer ranges give a reasonable wide birth to the central plains of the USA.. Western goes from west coast and highlands of Mexico and Central America in winter months to a broad swath of the Western USA and Western Provinces of Canada.  The Scarlet  goes further south into Western highlands of Bolivia Nicaragua and Equador and Western Brazil.  It migrates north oove rCozumel and the western edge of Cuba over to Florida and settles in the northern 2/3 of the Eastern 1/3 of the US pretty much over a large part of the Applachian Trail.  They seem to have very little overlap so it would be very rare to see the two in one location. Ruby-throated Hummingbird with Rufous Hummingbird Ruby-throated Hummingbird is the only hummingbird that makes its way to Massachusetts in the summer.  I have one family that started visiting me the summer of 2018 when I was on my porch a lot due to radiation treatments and the recovery process.  They had a single baby who I guessed was a female and loved my lantana.  2019 I added a feeder but am not sure they had a successful brood as I didn’t see the juvenile.  They winter in Mexico and Central America and migrate to the whole eastern half of USA and most of southern Canada East of the Rockies.  The Rufous winters in the northern half of the Ruby Throated’s range in Mexico but pretty much sticks to the Pacific coastal region for migration and breeding up in the Washington Oregon regions.  Its path home looks to take a less coastal path visiting Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico on its way back to Mexico wintering. Need to go Pacific side of Mexico below Baja to see them both in the winter. Sandhill Crane with Yellow-bellied Flycatcher no confusing these. Sandhill Crane sticks mostly to the USA and Canada including Alaska.  It winters over in the US and travels to a brad swath of Canada in the breeding season.  The flycatcher spends the winter in Central America and heads north mostly in the northeast USA and southeast Canada.  A branch seems to take a brief trip to the eastern side of Alaska.  Need to read more about them.  To see both birds on the same trip one would have to go to southern Canada between the Great Lakes and Hudson Bay. I really like the animation tool.  I saw several warblers briefly in F this winter and now know it was migration time (March and April).  That will set me up for Activity 2.
    • Marlene
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      Many of the “Likely Birds” in my region for the month of May are viewable from my home in the woods in Northeast Wisconsin. In the last two days I have seen some new ones enter the yard. Three indigo buntings just came in today. They seem to come in mid May every year. The Baltimore Oriole came in about a week ago. I have seen two sets, male & females. The end of April brought the Eastern Bluebirds. At least two sets of males & females. The Chickadees, Blue Jays and Red breasted Nuthatch are here too, and all year round. 20200514_194052[1] 20200514_175330[1]
      • Cathy
        Participant
        Chirps: 45
        Nice pictures, Marlene.  I'd love to see these types of birds.  I live in Maryland and, although they are within range, I don't think I've ever seen these.  I am originally from Illinois, but still don't think I've seen them there either.  Thanks for sharing.
    • Joy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      In comparing photos of American Goldfinches and Common Loons taken in summer and winter, I am struck with the vibrancy of their colors in summer and the almost "dressed down" look in winter. The rich yellow hue dominates the Goldfinch's breast and back in summer, along with a black cap. The black and white wings and tail offer a sharp contrast to the yellow. In winter, the black cap is missing and the yellow is faded to a dull brown on the back with a faded whitened yellow and/or brown tones on the breast. Wings and tail feathers look similar in both seasons. In summer, the Common Loon looks dapper with its black and white pinstripes separated by an emerald green band. The throat has a black and white curve. The red eye is striking. In winter, dulled browns and white dominate and the eye doesn't seem to be as striking in color. What surprised me was that photos of the winter Loon did not identify sex, usually indicating "Unknown."
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      1. I was very intrigued studying these migratory patterns. I had no idea the Cardinal was so specific to the eastern United States; that some birds migrate through our area on the way north and some, like the Rufous Hummingbird, come through on the way south; and that, while the Sandhill Crane is frequent here, it's prevalence is higher north of here. Knowing these migratory patterns will help me know what to look for and be able to find some of these species later this summer. I look forward to it!
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      Different Seasons Different Birds, Actvity 1, compare migrations of selected pairs Northern Cardinal with Blackburnian Warbler Northern Cardinal has a very static range.  There are minor fluctuations around the fringes and within the main body of the population in the eastern 2/3 of the USA.  There are also populations in southern CA, Nevada, Mexico (mostly coastal) and out into the Gulf coastal extensions of central America. Blackburnian Warbler is a long migrator who moves from the tropical highlands of the northern parts of South America (south of where the Cardinal winters in what looks like somewhat cooler regions). And flies largely north of the heartland of the Cardinal’s range.  They appear to overlap only in the summer in central to northern New England in the hillier parts of that region. I can recommend a summer drive on route 100 through the middle of Vermont if you want to see some beautiful country and have a chance to see both birds. Scarlet Tanager with Western Tanager Scarlet Tanager and Western Tanager do an East West split on the United States.  Their summer ranges give a reasonable wide birth to the central plains of the USA.. Western goes from west coast and highlands of Mexico and Central America in winter months to a broad swath of the Western USA and Western Provinces of Canada.  The Scarlet  goes further south into Eastern highlands of Bolivia Nicaragua and Equador and Western Brazil.  It migrates north over Cozumel and the western edge of Cuba over to Florida and settles in the northern 2/3 of the Eastern 1/3 of the US pretty much over a large part of the Applachian Trail.  They seem to have very little overlap so it would be very rare to see the two in one location. Ruby-throated Hummingbird with Rufous Hummingbird Ruby-throated Hummingbird is the only hummingbird that makes its way to Massachusetts in the summer.  I have one family that started visiting me the summer of 2018 when I was on my porch a lot due to radiation treatments and the recovery process.  They had a single baby who I guessed was a female and loved my lantana.  2019 I added a feeder but am not sure they had a successful brood as I didn’t see the juvenile.  They winter in Mexico and Central America and migrate to the whole eastern half of USA and most of southern Canada East of the Rockies.  The Rufous winters in the northern half of the Ruby Throated’s range in Mexico but pretty much sticks to the Pacific coastal region for migration and breeding up in the Washington Oregon regions.  Its path home looks to take a less coastal path visiting Idaho, Utah, Nevada, Arizona and New Mexico on its way back to Mexico wintering. Need to go Pacific side of Mexico below Baja to see them both in the winter. Sandhill Crane with Yellow-bellied Flycatcher no confusing these. Sandhill Crane sticks mostly to the USA and Canada including Alaska.  It winters over in the US and travels to a brad swath of Canada in the breeding season.  The flycatcher spends the winter in Central America and heads north mostly in the northeast USA and southeast Canada.  A branch seems to take a brief trip to the eastern side of Alaska.  Need to read more about them.  To see both birds on the same trip one would have to go to southern Canada between the Great Lakes and Hudson Bay. I really like the animation tool.  I saw several warblers briefly in F this winter and now know it was mib=gration time (March and April).
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      This was extracurricular activity  My wife found this spot on a walk  It has had “lots of white birds”  Today it had about 15 white ibis and a tricolor heron (new bird for me)  Yesterday it had only 5 ibis but also a great blue heron, a little blue heron, a snowy egret and 2 gallinules   A88AE70A-02FB-4EE5-BDD5-863631771A60
    • Charlotte
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Cardinals, woodpeckers and blue jays are year round residents but now visiting us here in northern New Jersey are the Baltimore orioles, rose breasted grosbeaks and ruby throated hummingbirds, all so beautiful to see.
    • Brad
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      The likely birds feature in Merlin is very cool.  During our stay at home time I have been able to keep an eye on my feeder much more than normal and see some of the trends on likely birds happening right in front of my eyes.
      • Marlene
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        Hi Brad. We have had the same great bird watching experience this year. Having to stay at home has provided us the opportunity to view more birds than we have in a long time. Today was extraordinary in our yard. I haven't seen so many beautiful and colorful birds altogether at one time as we did today. Cardinal, Easter Bluebirds, American Goldfinches (about 10 zipping around), 3 Blue Indigo Buntings, Red Breasted Grosbeak, Baltimore Oriole, Red Bellied Woodpecker, Blue Jays, Downy Woodpecker, and Black Capped Chickadees. All in the yard at about 1:45pm CST today. It was quite a site. From Northeast Wisconsin.