• Mia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      This week I have seen a bald eagle, a chickadee (a songbird?) and a robin. I am not sure what group the robin belongs to? I have also see trumpeter swans and geese as our community hosts a bird sanctuary by and in the river. I am loving learning more as my bird knowledge is very limited!!!
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I feel so bless to live in Michigan where a person is only a few short miles from a source of water.  I live only five miles from Shiawassee National Wildlife Refuge where 1,000's of birds will migrate to and from this area. The sound of Canadian Geeses is almost deafening.  I was exploring this week-end to start to work on the first lesson. I felt I was really 'seeing' birds for the first time. Although I have been watching back yard birds since childhood. In a very small area along the Saginaw River marsh land, I saw Bufflehead Ducks, Great Egret, Eagle standing on his nest, heron, Mallard Ducks, Northern Shoveler (duck), Tree Shallows, a lone Tundra Swan, and 2 families of Canadian Geese they each had 7 goslings--- and yes! they do follow in a row. I took the time to watch the behaviors of these different groups of birds. This has been such a difficult time for all of us. After my day exploring I felt a true since of calm and joy. I took the time to 'see'. I can't wait to start lesson #2.
    • Anne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I discovered a Coopers Hawk in my backyard.  It was high up in the trees.  I used bird Id app on my phone.  I was able to read about it in my field guide.  I didn't know I had hawks.
      • Ray
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        I see Coopers hawks here at times, though the Red-tailed Hawk and Red-shouldered Hawk are more common. We also get frequent visits by Bald Eagles, Osprey, and Peregrine Falcons. Golden Eagle is less frequent. Greetings from Chattanooga.
      • Sandra
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        How wonderful. The more I learn, the more I am fascinated. We just had a lovely spring rain, and I hear sparrows singing.
      • John
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        Coopers hawks are interesting hawks. They prey on songbirds. I've observed them chasing and feeding on them several times.
    • Sandra
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      I was lucky to be raised in an era when there were only 2 TV channels and have always loved an adventure. My grandma was a bird lover. I always enjoyed them but never had the time to learn the diversity of looks, sounds, behaviour! OMG! In the past year and a half I have been exploring new marshes, mountains and trails. I gasped the first time I saw a Great Blue Heron. Wood ducks are so beautifully colored. A few weeks ago I saw a group of hybrids; didn't know they existed. There are so many birders in British Columbia. I am drawn to the herons and the cute little ones, like the nuthatch.  April13,2020 (3)belmontApr2020 (30)rotary marsh 2019 (40)
      • Mishelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        Beautiful photos of these birds! I SAndra also paint birds, may I get permission to use this photo to paint Sandra?
      • Sandra
        Participant
        Chirps: 31

        @Mishelle Thanks. Yes, you have my permission to use the pics to paint.

      • Shreya
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        VERY STUNNING AND WONDERFUL BIRDS.
      • Manyu
        Participant
        Chirps: 42
        Amazing pictures @Sandra thank you for sharing.
      • Sheryl
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        beautiful! I love seeing birds with their reflections.
    • I love to watch the different woodpeckers come to feed on the suet in my yard.  One time, I saw three species at once: Downy, Hairy, and  Red-bellied. This morning I heard a Mourning Dove. Once, an immature Great Blue Heron flew onto the roof of my RV in my driveway.  
      • Sandra
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        A friend told me herons are good luck; so good luck to you!
    • Sue
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I am totally amazed at the stunning beauty of birds as depicted on the Wall of Birds! We spend winters in Tucson, AZ and the rest of the year in Northern Minnesota. In Tucson, I watch diligently for one of my favorites, the roadrunner.  In the last few years it has been difficult to spot one. However, this year it is a frequent site to see our neighborhood  roadrunner whizzing across the street. When I listened to the call of the loon on the wall of birds, I got a bit homesick for our home in Minnesota. It is so beautiful.
    • Megan loves birds
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Hearing the calls of the mourning dove during this first lesson brought back memories of my childhood home. :)
    • Reinoud
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Dear all, I am currently living in Suriname and I have observed beautiful and various sorts of usually small birds. Does anyone has more insights on bird life in Suriname? Thank you, Reinoud
    • susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I am new to bird watching but always enjoyed sitting outside or looking out my window at all the different birds that come to my small lot in Milwaukee, WI and try to identify what kind of birds are in my yard. The group that is most prevalent in my yard is the song birds. But, I also have a raptor, morning doves and hummingbirds.  I have to say the hummingbird is my favorite bird. I could sit and watch them all day. Today I seen a small bird with a red crown hopping in the canopy of the Cornelian Dogwoods which are in full bloom now. I have identified it as a red-crowned kinglet.  I do have a lot of birds that migrate through.  I maintain my yard as naturally as city ordinance allows.  I leave the leaves in the flower beds and I have many layers of woody plants(trees, shrubs and ground cover) and evergreens.  I provid different varieties of food for them and water. During the growing season, I plant flowers specifically for hummingbirds and monarchs. I look forward to learn more about birdwatching and identification, especially by song. There are many times I do not see the bird but hear their beautiful melody.
    • Mary Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      9592725A-B171-4E40-B2D9-B5A94874B78F Purple Martin- Croton Point Park, Westchester, NY
    • Andrei
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I already answered but now I can present the photos. In the mean time I discovered 2 birds that I like.   Can you please help me identify them?   Thank you, Andrei IMG_1215IMG_1322
      • Andrei
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Are they a Greenfinch and a Black Redstart?
      • Riccardo
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        The second yes, it’s a black redstart
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I very much enjoyed the first session of this course. I have watched birds for many years, but certainly I am not well informed. This Ruffed Grouse became part of our family in Western New York 2 years ago. EA63833E-592B-402E-BEE8-FC107CADFB4A
    • Molly
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I have a lovely path near my home that I can walk to in 7 minutes or so (I live in western Massachusetts).  It is a raised path between two wetland, swampy areas so there are always birds to be heard and seen.  Yesterday I saw a very small bird that I didn't recognize.  It jumped along the ground and in bushes near me for quite a while, as I stood.  I was able to observe the beak, which was thin and a bit long, but not curved at all.  I had been thinking that maybe it was a Carolina Wren but the beak was not right for that.  When I got home, I looked in my bird app and it may have been a Ruby-crowned kinglet.  Maybe...
      • Tom
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        Molly, you summed it up right there...birdwatching has a lot of “maybe” moments!  And then also some of those YES times as well. It’s very humbling (a good thing in any pursuit or passion) and keeps me looking, going to the guides and other resources (like this course).  I also learn so much reading the comments which puts a people-friendly spin on this course. I’ve started taking more pictures, which is itself a challenge.  First I had a craigslist used $20 Nikon digital with 18x (optical) 72x (digital) zoom which was better than 7x cell phone zoom. Got hooked and bought Nikon P900 with 83x optical zoom.  Wowsa!  It’s been so fun to go “bird hunting.”
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      1) Songbirds- what’s not to love? I live in Redlands, So Cal, near an Oak Grove, in a neighborhood with various mature trees and native chaparral hills. My days are beautified by birdsong, and I don’t know who is singing. I voted for the Carolina Wren because it represented the Wren family, but I love the sparrows and warblers, too. I appreciate that the Wall of Birds and the Merlin app have sound/song clips. On the Wall I also explored shore birds (sandpipers), seabirds (pelican), owls, raptors and the barn swallow- I almost voted for it. 2/3) Today I saw a yellow-green finch like bird, a few hummers (one is greenish, another brown and white), and a soaring swift or swallow type bird. And I heard a symphony of sweet song, as well as a distant crow and a nearby falcon. I’m a novice identifier, but a lifelong bird lover.
      • Sandra
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        I love the songbirds. So peaceful. When i see them I often say hello cutie, or some such thing.
    • James
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      On the Wall of Birds - I liked the Iwii in Hawaii - it is an impressive bird with bright orange/red plumes that were prized by ancient Hawaiians. I am fascinated by the indigenous species in Hawai'i like the Iwii that are believed to have descended from the same species of birds that branched out to an amazing array of species of birds that took on very unique features of unrelated species.  I also voted for the Wood Duck, such a beautiful bird. It was very windy where I live yesterday and very few birds out and about. I did see what I was sure was a raptor at a distance that I could not identify in a nearby park. Very white belly and underwings. Just before I got back to the car two of them flew overhead and landed on a light pole. Two Osprey!
      • Molly
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I go to Hawaii every couple of years.  A few years ago, I went on a bird walk i with Jack Jeffrey, a well-known birder specializing in endemic Hawaiian birds.  I was the only novice on this hike and thank goodness for the others who could spot all the birds that I hoped to see.  The i'iwi is my favorite also - and we did see it, along with many of the beautiful tiny birds that can only survive in the higher elevations now, due to non-native predators including mosquitoes.
    • Chris
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      9956E562-9EB1-4D08-B42D-F1D9BDB3222A6FDC93DC-EE7E-40BA-932B-19C25F98F200 A male and female cardinal from my backyard in the suburbs of Minneapolis.
      • Manyu
        Participant
        Chirps: 42
        I wish we had cardinals in India. They are so beautiful.
    • Robin
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Last year I took a 10-week course where we did an overview of some 72 North American bird families. It was overwhelming, and I really liked the part of this lesson that showed smaller, informal categories (e.g. songbirds, raptors, wading birds) and subgroups of songbirds (acrobatic flyers, sparrows, etc.) Here in suburban Maryland outside Washington DC, birds I commonly see in the backyard include mourning doves, robins, Northern cardinals, a couple finches (house, or purple?), bluejays, song sparrows, and seasonal visits by juncos, redwing blackbirds, grackles, and cowbirds. Also plenty of invasive house sparrows and starlings. On our tree in the front yard we get white-breasted nuthatches and flickers. We are not close enough to a forest or meadow to get many non-feeder species, so those are the ones I'm hoping to find and learn.
    • Mary Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      I am a newbie to bird watching and even listen in awe of the serious bird watchers! I am in the suburbs of NYC and  I have seen the following at my bird feeder: Common Grackle, Pileated Woodpecker,  Black-capped chickadee, Mourning Dove, Downy Woodpecker, Northern Cardinal, and Chipping Sparrows. My yard is filled with robins and crows! Yesterday at Croton Point Park I saw my first Purple Martin! So exciting!
    • Vicki g
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      female wood duck I learned about the Wood Duck, when my son - in Brewster, MA - on Cape Cod, MA in USA  rescued this female from the bottom of his chimney on Saturday after 3 days of mysterious noises. Duck was not what they imagined. I discovered that uniquely these ducks have claws, as well, for securely being in trees. This also reinforced to me the need to look at both mail and female pictures to identify a bird (you can tell I am a novice), as the make Wood Duck  has a wildly colorful head. Their house is on the edge of a woods, with wetland behind and a small pond about 200 yards away. (And the men in our area seem to be cultivating very wierd mustaches during the pandemic).
      • Sandra
        Participant
        Chirps: 31
        I saw my first Wood duck last week. So spectacular! belmontApr2020 (29)
    • Julie
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Hello all! Here are my activities: Activity 1 - Love the Bird Wall! The video is quite inspirational, nice to hear what the artist had to say, what an interesting career. Although extinct, I was fascinated by the Ornimegalonyx, a four foot owl. We have owls in my area, and I can only imagine what it would be like to see that. Incredible. Activity 2 - Three birds I found outside and was able to identify; 1. Junco - we love these guys. Every year they come by and nest in the hillside behind our house in Southern California. I did not know they were in the sparrow group, they are lively and fun to watch. 2. Mallard - this is an easy one, but we have a mated pair that has been roaming our neighborhood, they are suburban ducks! Lots of neighbors reporting sightings on our neighborhood app. They are much loved.  3. Red - crowned parrot. We have a large flock in the area we live in, which is the foothill area north of Los Angeles. I downloaded the Merlin app and was able to identify the species. Interesting that the only area they live in outside of Mexico is here. All kinds of stories about the exotic bird farms that were abandoned in the past, resulting in flocks of parrots establishing themselves here. There is a photo of a flock attached to this post. They thrive here. Activity 3 - Favorite bird - Allen’s Hummingbird. Also using the Merlin app was able to identify this species. We have had 8 baby hummingbirds hatch and launch from our patio over the past five years. Most recent one just flew off  last weekend. This has become a favorite spring activity and this year with more time at home has brought us a lot of time to observe watching the mama build the nest, feed the baby, weather a storm, and the baby reluctantly leaving the nest. Usually they lay20200322_112000two eggs, but this one laid only one. We think junior was pretty comfortable. He took longer than usual to leave and was pretty big! 20200403_18381220200426_080953
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Scrolling through all the photo and am amazed by the variety of birds that have been submitted.  Thank you for all the pictures.
    • DocJunior
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I don’t have an image of a bird to post, but we recently moved to southern Massachusetts, and our yard appears to be the intersection of several Northern Flicker territories. From early morning to evening, we are surrounded by Northern Flickers, each of whom has an opinion to give ... repeatedly ... all day long 😂
    • curt
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      It would be nice if the photos indicated where the bird is found - is it my area or somewhere far away? Hope we see more video with the prof...and less reading from the screen. Onward!
    • curt
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      woodpecker-pileated3turkey3-11-05
      • Catherine
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        Thank you for that photo of the pileated woodpecker, Curt! I've been commenting on it regarding others' posts, and here is a photo! Very typical, I think--and, of course, very impressive. It reminds me of the walks I used to take through a very small woodland (disputed terrain between a city and a developer--and the city was still winning:), when I often saw it (and certainly heard it) every day. I guess (for today) it is my favorite bird :)
    • Manyu
      Participant
      Chirps: 42
      Activity 3 : Peahen , the neighborhood bird. Feathers not as beautiful as the male peacock but walks very elegantly, the kids follow her trail, she feels very comfortable when I am around and take a short flight if I make sudden move. It is big but still very gentle to other birds. Locally we believe if peahen is singing continuously that means it is about to rain. IMG_2871
      • Robin
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        How wonderful to see a peahen up close!
      • Sheryl
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        Her crown (head-dress? hairdo?) is amazing.