• Kerry
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      IMG_5291I need practice!
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I'm feeling a bit more comfortable with each new drawing. I need to work on quite a bit. Dimension; light; finding the curves and shape of the object. But it's coming. apple drawing
    • Breanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Always good to revisit the basics of light and shadow! I have always struggled with making shapes look like shapes. What helped me the most here was my husband teaching me about the terminator line. That is the point on the object past which the original light source does not shine. It will be the darkest line on the object, and the gradient of shadows behind it will be all darker than the darkest shadow on the lit side. IMG20240114171816
      • Jenny
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        This was a helpful comment. Thank you.
    • Rob
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I am fairly new to sketching and drawing and would like to know more about various methods of filling in subjects(ie. use of crosshatching or tippling). These are new things that I don't know about and would like to see this included in the course material.
    • Chris
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I like to think about the direction the light is coming from which helps a lot. I also think using your finger to blend really makes it look better.
    • Kristen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      IMG_6165 This was a really challenging but enjoyable lesson. I've never considered how to approach the different shades of light within an object. I still plan on practicing this skill before moving on. As others have shared, it's difficult to capture texture without it clouding the shadows. I look forward to continuing to learn and practice this skill.
    • Tia
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I appreciate the reminder to know where the light is coming from and go from there. I am nervous when I start with the shadows that I will creep too much darkness into the light areas and it is hard to work backwards and lighten things up.IMG_0753
    • Kimberly
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      IMG_1598IMG_1597IMG_1599
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      20231127_152405 Persimmon with varying light source.
    • Camille
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Screenshot 2023-08-04 at 5.49.37 PM I am a newbie, so this is my first time trying this technique. I plan to try this technique a few more times before moving on.
    • Penelope
      Participant
      Chirps: 38
      One of my favorite drawing techniques was blending. Drawing with 3D isn't exactly new, but its exciting to refresh skills.   3D
    • Emmanuel
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      image
    • Kurt
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      Looking at 6 different methods of shading has, I feel helped with understanding how to draw objects and render them to look more three-dimensional. Still, though, this technique could use more work and I will continue to practice with it. When I lok at items I have drawn, attempting to pay attention to chiaroscuro, shading, and other methods to make it look three dimensional, I see just a flat image that's darker in some areas than others, I need to continue working to fully show these objects as they are. Chiaroscuro Technique 6:16
    • Jordan
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Learning about chiaroscuro helped me place the light and dark areas on my paper more precisely, but I definitely need more practice.
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      IMG_1951 copy Was fun looking for the various parts of the chiaroscuro. I was curious that my mango had another band of shadow below the reflected light - I think it might have been reflected off the darkest cast shadow? I was glad for the freedom to experiment with the different types of marks - sometimes the hatching was enough, but I found myself cross-hatching and scribbling too. I appreciate others' comments on the difficulty of finding the chiaroscuro in a highly textured object!
    • Maribeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 43
      BEAR SKETCH.pegI did not care for my former attempts at creating three d. I am blaming it on the 10.5 inches of snow. I went to the Audubon center that is near and sketched the bear. Hope this is better.
    • Maribeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 43
      Ch
    • Jessica
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_8974 I remember this being hard in my high school art classes, and it certainly hasn't gotten any easier. I feel like it got a little easier with each attempt, although I certainly have a long way to go! I also want to work on my light, sketchy marks -- my tendency is to go too heavy and dark right away.
    • Sue
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      20230216_135610
    • Maritte
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      fu
      • Vivian
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        I like the looseness of this rendering.  It makes me want to give scribbling another look!
    • Lori
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      IMG_6754Very fun...but not very realistic...not a chicken! it is an onion!! ha...I loved learning about Chiaroscuro. I love that kind of information because it helps me to better understand what I'm seeing.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      20230120_153954 For me this is a whole new way of looking at things. I can see how the different shading and blending techniques really make a difference in your drawings. Lighting makes a difference too. Today was very cloudy and the lights in my office were casting weird shadows which made it difficult for me to see some of the highlights and shadows.                            
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I like being able to use different shading techniques, and especially the blending which is new to me. Thank you. I found that some objects are easier to shade/shadow than others. For example, a lightly tanned potato was difficult because the smooth skin mostly looked the same from any angle. The image inserted below shows what I selected as a difficult object--for a beginner--to draw, namely a piece of firewood (which I had sawn and chopped for our wood stove!) I would appreciate a critique, please. When all the colors are similar shades of brown and gray, how do we differentiate? Suggestion: Could Liz or a colleague present a demonstration video on how to shade complex objects, such as a log?In other words, could the class have an additional video that applies our basic skills in shading the ball, chiaroscuro, to show how to tackle a more difficult object, please?   Log sketch-DSCN8132 (2)
      • Vivian
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Very good question!  I've often wondered how to differentiate between shadow and color in a black and white drawing -- hope someone has an answer.  Your log is beautifully rendered, and I think you could have gone even darker in some sections.
    • Oksana
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      these are garlic and tomato, I wish they'd look more 3d. Need more practise I guess! 2B8E0FD4-628D-4790-A73C-9B1A7B639A14_1_201_a
    • Catherine
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I can see the changes in light on objects a lot more now.  My eye searches for the different shades in the shadow too.  I am drawing objects to compare shading so yes drawing a lot more than I ever have before and enjoying learning about light reflection.  I have never studied that before now.