• Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I’m really new to sketching and this was challenging, but I was surprised at how not terrible my bird’s shape and proportion came out. I can’t wait to learn some tools in the upcoming lessons to see how my style develops. The feet were challenging for me, and painting it didn’t do it any favors, but whatever. I’m here to learn!739CB885-9764-4A1E-9275-B8B6EAB4DC17
    • Kind of scary until the head was drawn and it surprised me by looking like a bird! The head imagewas easy; trying to get the body proportioned was more difficult.  I would not have noticed the brownish stripes on the bird or the way the feet were wrapped around the branch. This would make a huge difference in nature journaling because the more you notice, the better able you are to identify the object.
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Amazed; surprised at liking my drawing. I stopped thinking and just drew; shape, shape, shade, get some scale on the beak, position eye, then more shading with shape of tail. I was out of my comfort zone until I wasn't. DJ's journal and narrative was a big difference maker. Feet were most challenging, partly because of the angle. I would not have noticed the bird's bend to the right without trying to draw the legs and feet. In journaling, that's significant.Photo on 3-8-21 at 5.40 PM
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I think it was probably easier to see details on a photo of a bird than in real life because obviously the birds typically are moving around but it was less relaxing. I think when in nature, I feel like I would sketch and not worry but here where it's clearly that I'm seeing all of the details, I felt some sort of pressure to include all of the details (of the bird - didn't do much with tree). It was interesting as I started going along how I started to notice the layering of the feathers and slight tone differential of all of the yellows and browns. When I came to the neck towards the end of my time, I didn't realize at first there had been a pattern there. YellowBird NJCMarch2021 from photo
    • Camille
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Taking the time to stop and observe was itself grounding, relaxing, drawing is a little unnerving, when done for critique. Still it is so good to put pencil to paper. What was easy was the angles of the contour, what was challenging were the proportions, and the feeling of 'hereness' of the bird. I would not have noticed the blunted point of the beak, the wrinkleliness of the branches, the lichen, the slight turn of the head towards us, the very different angles of the legs, the orange breast streaks.
    • Glen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I definitely notice more detail in the photo when I am drawing from it.  I was afraid that my drawing would not look like the Yellow Warbler that I know but it does have some resemblance.  The outline of the bird cam easier than I thought it might.  Filling in the wings and rest of the bird was harder than I thought it might be. -like how to get those primary feathers to look like primary feathers.
    • Glen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      53C8B459-03EA-45CF-B4C1-A53058035303_1_201_a
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      I enjoyed drawing from the photo. What came most easily was that the bird stayed nice and still! The angles of the legs and the way the feet wrap around the branch was the most challenging and also what I might not have noticed if I hadn't drawn it. And yes, this would make a difference when nature journaling....
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      It was a blast.  I really enjoyed creating. The shapes came pretty easily and the proportions were harder.  The shading also seems harder.  How do you make the shadows and the darker lines in black and white.  I noticed the lines on the feathers and around the eye, also the moss on the branches.  These differences would be missed if just looking at the photo.19B8C884-9BE4-4ACB-BB7E-B61890226554
    • Adrianna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1) At first it seemed easy. Getting the outline was okay. It was more difficult when I began adding details. I felt like I was messing up the more I added, and I was happier when it was more of a general shape and feel. 2) I definitely notice the bill and eye details more - particularly the shape and color.
    • Van
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I felt find drawing from a photo.  Easier than chasing a fluttering bird.  I think any time you are asked to draw a thing you pay more attention to the details, like the black eye, the layers of covert feathers, the red streaking.  You can dig down deeper into the little things.  I think the goal, for me, to do the NJing is to pay more attention to these details.   IMG_0859  
    • Francesca
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Having a photo to draw from wasn't too bad.  I found it a little difficult to get the posture of the bird right.  And without coloring it in, it's hard to distinguish between the greenish & black on the back of the bird and the bright brown on the front. I definitely noticed more about the feather structure than I would have from just looking at the photo.
      • Francesca
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        IMG_9646
      • Francesca
        Participant
        Chirps: 9

        @Francesca IMG_9648 I wanted to try to get some of the color, so I experimented with the watercolors on a second draft.  I am not a very experienced painter, and my lines seem very wide and uncontrolled compared to some others I see.

    • Mike
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_0001The drawing was a bit challenging having not seriously practiced drawing for over 40 years. The basic shape came easily but getting the shading and details was challenging. Just looking at the photo I would not have paid attention to the different types of feathers or their placement. It encourages you to pay more attention which will only enhance your journaling and make it more meaningful and memorable.
    • Leo
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      034983CA-3EB5-4600-91EA-76F11802042E
    • Melissa
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      1) I was apprehensive about drawing a close-up of an animal because I usually draw scenary. Once I got going, drawing shapes and their relation to each other was relatively easy for me, but getting the textures right was difficult. 2) There was a lot I didn't notice until I was trying to draw it, especially the color variations throughout! This would make a huge difference when nature journaling!
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Photos give me time to compose my page - and the bird sits still!  (unlike if I was spotting them along my creek). As always, the sketching forces me to slow down, and then I really do start to notice the little things. Like the lichen on the branch, the bug holes in the leaves and the amazing feet of the warbler. Once everything is on the page, then I had fun listening to the song of the yellow warbler & learning about it's range.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_7171
    • Dawn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I photograph birds and nature a lot and enjoy it. It's a quick way to capture a moment that quickly disappears! I then use the photo and take my time to draw in the details that I wouldn't have had time to with birds. Photos are also great in inclement weather when you can't spend a long time outside! Plants and trees are more easily sketched and watercoloured since they don't move much, other than a little breeze or the light changing. I really prefer the journaling as it is a more personal way to record your time with nature. Perhaps more "grounding" if you will.   IMG_0820
    • Charlotte
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I find both photographing and drawing equally challenging.  I have spent many hours just watching a bird to see how it moves, what it does, how it looks at different angles, and waiting for the "shot" I want to take.  I really get offended when someone wants to use my photo for a painting without asking me.  I spend lots of time and money on camera equipment, finding the bird and taking the picture.  Often "artists" do not recognize that photography is also an art form.  I have spent hours in freezing temperatures and many hours in the car searching for birds such as snowy owls.  So, I don't think photos are quick and easy.  However, I also like drawing birds and wildlife from nature and my own photos.  It is equally as rewarding in different ways.  I am certainly not an expert at either, or I wouldn't still be taking courses such as this.
    • Emma
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      B7D0844B-E6B3-4D4A-806D-EBFA14F6A1DF I liked drawing from the photo, because photos don’t move around like real birds do. I haven't actually tried sketching a bird in real time, though, and I can't wait to do that at some point! If I hadn't been asked to draw the photo, I probably wouldn't have noticed a lot of the smaller details like the moss on the branch or the positioning of the warbler's legs. I'm excited to do this again at the end of the course and see how my drawing has changed! :)
    • Alice
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1. I like drawing from photos because I can take my time. The drawback is I can't alter the focus -- some parts of the photo is blurred and I can't see what's going on there. 2. I would not have noticed how colorful the tree branch is! Also I think I would've not been able to notice how the feathers and feather groups lay in relation to one another, and the proportions of the feet and legs  (birds rarely come close enough and stay long enough). 144982413_779048062699479_1786355540921751440_n
    • Lucas
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      MyFirstDrawing I felt the watercolour and the legs were the hardest. What I enjoyed was paying attention to to the details and really appreciating the bird. It really helped me make a connection to the bird, and if I were taking a photograph in the field, I wouldn't have noticed the positioning of the feet, the overall positioning of the bird, and the details on the wings.
    • Cherry
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_2247 I found drawing the legs and feet the most challenging. What I enjoy about drawing birds is having to pay attention to the details - the posture of the bird and the overall shape of the birds. I hope to master the feathers, bills, and feet!
    • Wesley
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I felt good while sketching the birds and I think it was a satisfying result. The easiest part in my opinion was that it was a picture so I didn't have to worry about it shifting positions. What was challenging was that I didn't know how much detail to put into it. One thing that I like about sketching is that I notice things I wouldn't have otherwise if I was just passing by it on a walk. One thing that I noticed while sketching, was the talons, I never noticed how intricately they wrapped around the tree branches. The way that they wrap around to me seems so flexible and something I wouldn't dream of doing with my hands. It's cool to see how adaptations allow animals to do such things. If you're are wondering why there are two, it's because me and my mom did them together. (me top, bottom mom) PXL_20210130_010953763_2
    • Lynne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I enjoy looking at my first drawing of this sweet little yellow warbler. It came easily and it was challenging. The distance between the beak and the eye and the claws/talons/feet were challenging. I never noticed the layers of feathers or the number of individual claws (for lack of the real term). Yes, it would make a difference with nature journaling.