• Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      1. How did you feel about drawing from the photo? What came easily and what was challenging? 2. Was there anything in the photo that you might not have noticed if you weren’t asked to draw it? Would this make a difference when nature journaling?
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    • Caroline
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      One nice thing about drawing from a photo is that the subject does not move.  I think I did okay on the basic shape and proportions.  I found the beak to be the most challenging for me.  I tried to draw quickly and not over-think the details. If I had not been asked to draw the bird, I might not have noticed how red the streaks on the breast are.  Also, at first glance, the legs appeared grey to me.  As I drew, I noticed lots of yellow in them.  The texture of the wing feathers change from the shoulder to the wingtips.  When nature journaling, I would want to note these characteristics and I hope with my pencil or brush strokes to draw or paint such a texture change.Nature Journaling L1
    • Pat
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      bird sketch I like drawing from photos.  I do not try for perfection, but to capture the essence of what I am sketching.  I see different details when using a photo, but miss actual colors and movements. Pat. May 1, 2024
    • Roxy
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      It's 20 years since I did any artwork. This felt exhilarating. Of course now I see 45million things I could've done differently...20240415_110705
    • Tracey
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      IMG_0035 Drawing from the photo made it easier to see details I would otherwise miss. I could easily get the overall shape and could go back and make changes as I put in more detail. Although I know there are different types of feathers on a bird, I would probably miss the placement and textures because the bird would have flown away long before I got much recorded. Some details in particular I would have missed are the feather on the back that must lay down even in length look sort of like an arch over the back between the longer feathers of the wing. Also, the angle of the legs show the way the bird is peeking over its shoulder slightly. I also had time to make changes to some ares as I looked more closely and had time to figure out with I was seeing. I didn’t add color because that’s just a whole other challenge for me.
    • Kelly
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I took a longer time to draw stuff out since my reference was a photo. But I really took the time to try and look at all the details. I didn't realize how many layers of feathers they had until having to try and draw all of them out. When drawing with a live bird I'd have to be quicker overall with my sketching and trying to observe more characteristics.
    • SHP
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Well, I’m among some very talented people. I think I will not post my drawing this time, though I think I did all right for my beginning level. I liked this exercise.  It made me observe deeply.  If I had taken a photo, I would have seen the bird, but not closely observed it.  In drawing, we must observe.  Very important in nature journaling! My biggest challenge with this exercise was to get the positioning of the bird correct.  In the photo, the warbler looks as if he’s ready to launch.  I didn’t completely capture that. This is a great course, I can see that already.  I look forward to seeing the warbler I draw at the end of the course.
    • Janice
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      20240325_105648 Drawing birds has always felt intimidating to me so having a photo to reference was helpful. While I am happy with how this turned out as a first try, I didn't quite capture the posture of the warbler in the photo. The wings and tail were most difficult for me. I am looking forward to learning how to sketch "freely"!
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      I was inspired by the drawing in my journal and decided to do a painting.Yellow Warbler Painting
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Yellow Wabler Drawing
    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      My bird is pretty basic (especially after seeing others' birds in these posts).  I used colored pencils. 1 - I liked drawing from a photo, because I can keep looking back at the photo to correct as I draw. It was easier than I thought to get the shape and general appearance of the bird.  The details in the feathers was a little challenging. 2 - The details of the color changes in the feathers, especially the orange/brown in the belly.
    • MF
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      I enjoyed drawing the bird. Repeated the process the day after. Struggling to choose the proper  tools and steps for sketching, and then coloring. Happy to realize that my drawing of birds was easier and had improved, following the reading of John Muir Laws book, The Laws Guide of drawing birds. S till struggling to structure the different wing sections and looking forward to learning to sketch live and develop a freer approach with this course.image
    • Alexis
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I took the time to sketch this first thing in the morning before starting my work day. I thought it might help prepare me to manage my stress for the day.  It has served me well.   The three circles at the bottom are reserved for adding in my 3 primary colors if I were to paint this. I will add a yellow, medium brown, and black.   I enjoyed drawing the bird.  The branches and related texture was a bit scary as I had no idea how to create texture. I am delighted with my first finished project. thumbnail_IMG_5791
    • Daniela
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      WhatsApp Image 2024-03-13 at 8.59.23 AM
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_0031I thought it was challenging to really pay attention to the basic shapes of the bird, and to get the proportions properly put down on paper. I thought the feet were surprisingly positioned on this little bird, but I drew what I saw the size of the eye and the position of the beak, made me do a little erasing, but I was able to get the angle of the beak, sort of corrected. I only used a drawing pencil did not use color for this sketch but I’m very happy with what I got so far
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I thought it was challenging to really pay attention to the basic shapes of the bird, and to get the proportions properly put down on paper. I thought the feet were surprisingly positioned on this little bird, but I drew what I saw the size of the eye and the position of the beak, made me do a little erasing, but I was able to get the angle of the beak, sort of corrected. I only used a drawing pencil did not use color for this sketch but I’m very happy with what I got so far
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      PXL_20240311_221850356 It will be fun to see if I get any better at drawing by the end of the course :-) Very hard to get the fluffiness of the feathers.
    • Toni
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      IMG_8078IMG_8080
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      IMG_3563
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      IMG_3561
    • Claudio
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I had a lot of fun painting this lil bird! It’s always so much easier when ur model stays still lol. I did struggle at first with figuring out proportions, but that only made me pay more close attention to the warbler’s anatomy and color subtleties. I think that is very important to nature journaling because it adds a level of detail you might not notice in a photo. IMG_0199
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I appreciated having a photo for a first attempt. The warbler held nice and still and let me draw it from the comfort of my living room. Even though the bird was the focus, I found myself most drawn to the branches and lichen. The shallow depth of field of the photo made it simple to focus on the objects in the foreground. The bird and its feathers were a challenge. I tried sketching with watercolor and didn't get the shape quite right. I haven't tried my hand at watercolor in ages, so I suppose this was a passable first attempt. Definitely a more challenging medium than pencil, but practice makes for improvement. I suspect that if I were in the field I might have skipped drawing the bird all together and spent my time drawing twigs. yellow warbler 2024-02-21
    • Liz
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Sketch1 I enjoyed this- the photo is still!...unlike a warbler. The overall shape of obvious features were easier, but the legs- getting the appearance of weight distribution right, and the feathers- all in proportion - very difficult for me and lots of work to do there. I obviously focused on the bird, instead of its surroundings- but I think that's because I'm still not super quick at sketching accurately as I'd like. The composition of the photo is excellent- I certainly noticed those elements. I noticed how much more grey or appearance of grey (black distributed in yellow?) in the plumage of this bright yellow bird than I would've ever noticed if taking or looking at a photo. The photo of my sketch distorts the sketch a bit- it's longer than this appears, but I still ended up drawing more the body of a sparrow than capturing the narrower, sleeker length of this bird in this position. All of this would make a big difference in journaling- it's the stuff of the comments. For example, warblers are so difficult for me to commit to memory- there are so many, seen so infrequently, etc.- going through the process of observing and 'transcribing' what you see has to have an influence on the memory- and those distinguishing details all the more so.
    • Jeff
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I love seeing all the different drawings after I did mine. It was nice having the photo to come back to. Drawing it really helped me see a lot of detail, particularly in the feathers and leaves, which was fun. I have to overcome a fear of "not being good", and I think this exercise helped since spent a good deal of time on it, it was fun, I think I managed to get some things the way I wanted. IMG_1104
    • Valeria
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Drawing allows to cacth many more details, even though drawing animals in open nature usually requires to jot down very fast the animal before it moves, missing likely some details. It is to be learnt how to jot down the most important information by drawing and taking notes when in open nature. When drawing in black and white it's important to take notes fast about colours - I usually carry a few pencils when stopping and observing nature is part of hiking. Whereas if you're observing, for example, birds at a feeder, it is easier to go back day after day on some details. Photos allow to appreciate the subject as a whole, let you appreciate the colours as a whole and catch fast the setting. And of course a photo allows to go back to it once at home and to draw it any time later.   Yellow warbler copy