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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      1. How did you feel about drawing from the photo? What came easily and what was challenging? 2. Was there anything in the photo that you might not have noticed if you weren’t asked to draw it? Would this make a difference when nature journaling?
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    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      kathleentitus
      I enjoyed drawing from the photo. What came most easily was that the bird stayed nice and still! The angles of the legs and the way the feet wrap around the branch was the most challenging and also what I might not have noticed if I hadn't drawn it. And yes, this would make a difference when nature journaling....
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Anna52
      It was a blast.  I really enjoyed creating. The shapes came pretty easily and the proportions were harder.  The shading also seems harder.  How do you make the shadows and the darker lines in black and white.  I noticed the lines on the feathers and around the eye, also the moss on the branches.  These differences would be missed if just looking at the photo.19B8C884-9BE4-4ACB-BB7E-B61890226554
    • Adrianna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      AdAnderson11
      1) At first it seemed easy. Getting the outline was okay. It was more difficult when I began adding details. I felt like I was messing up the more I added, and I was happier when it was more of a general shape and feel. 2) I definitely notice the bill and eye details more - particularly the shape and color.
    • Van
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      VanMcC
      I felt find drawing from a photo.  Easier than chasing a fluttering bird.  I think any time you are asked to draw a thing you pay more attention to the details, like the black eye, the layers of covert feathers, the red streaking.  You can dig down deeper into the little things.  I think the goal, for me, to do the NJing is to pay more attention to these details.   IMG_0859  
    • Francesca
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      FrancescaB
      Having a photo to draw from wasn't too bad.  I found it a little difficult to get the posture of the bird right.  And without coloring it in, it's hard to distinguish between the greenish & black on the back of the bird and the bright brown on the front. I definitely noticed more about the feather structure than I would have from just looking at the photo.
      • Francesca
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        FrancescaB
        IMG_9646
      • Francesca
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        FrancescaB

        @Francesca IMG_9648 I wanted to try to get some of the color, so I experimented with the watercolors on a second draft.  I am not a very experienced painter, and my lines seem very wide and uncontrolled compared to some others I see.

    • Mike
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      MCurtis1
      IMG_0001The drawing was a bit challenging having not seriously practiced drawing for over 40 years. The basic shape came easily but getting the shading and details was challenging. Just looking at the photo I would not have paid attention to the different types of feathers or their placement. It encourages you to pay more attention which will only enhance your journaling and make it more meaningful and memorable.
    • Leo
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      LeoSnead2
      034983CA-3EB5-4600-91EA-76F11802042E
    • Melissa
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      meli9er
      1) I was apprehensive about drawing a close-up of an animal because I usually draw scenary. Once I got going, drawing shapes and their relation to each other was relatively easy for me, but getting the textures right was difficult. 2) There was a lot I didn't notice until I was trying to draw it, especially the color variations throughout! This would make a huge difference when nature journaling!
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      LeeZLee
      Photos give me time to compose my page - and the bird sits still!  (unlike if I was spotting them along my creek). As always, the sketching forces me to slow down, and then I really do start to notice the little things. Like the lichen on the branch, the bug holes in the leaves and the amazing feet of the warbler. Once everything is on the page, then I had fun listening to the song of the yellow warbler & learning about it's range.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      nlrboomer
      IMG_7171
    • Dawn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Dawn C.
      I photograph birds and nature a lot and enjoy it. It's a quick way to capture a moment that quickly disappears! I then use the photo and take my time to draw in the details that I wouldn't have had time to with birds. Photos are also great in inclement weather when you can't spend a long time outside! Plants and trees are more easily sketched and watercoloured since they don't move much, other than a little breeze or the light changing. I really prefer the journaling as it is a more personal way to record your time with nature. Perhaps more "grounding" if you will.   IMG_0820
    • Charlotte
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      charadams
      I find both photographing and drawing equally challenging.  I have spent many hours just watching a bird to see how it moves, what it does, how it looks at different angles, and waiting for the "shot" I want to take.  I really get offended when someone wants to use my photo for a painting without asking me.  I spend lots of time and money on camera equipment, finding the bird and taking the picture.  Often "artists" do not recognize that photography is also an art form.  I have spent hours in freezing temperatures and many hours in the car searching for birds such as snowy owls.  So, I don't think photos are quick and easy.  However, I also like drawing birds and wildlife from nature and my own photos.  It is equally as rewarding in different ways.  I am certainly not an expert at either, or I wouldn't still be taking courses such as this.
    • Emma
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      BirdFriendForever
      B7D0844B-E6B3-4D4A-806D-EBFA14F6A1DF I liked drawing from the photo, because photos don’t move around like real birds do. I haven't actually tried sketching a bird in real time, though, and I can't wait to do that at some point! If I hadn't been asked to draw the photo, I probably wouldn't have noticed a lot of the smaller details like the moss on the branch or the positioning of the warbler's legs. I'm excited to do this again at the end of the course and see how my drawing has changed! :)
    • Alice
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      aliceclee
      1. I like drawing from photos because I can take my time. The drawback is I can't alter the focus -- some parts of the photo is blurred and I can't see what's going on there. 2. I would not have noticed how colorful the tree branch is! Also I think I would've not been able to notice how the feathers and feather groups lay in relation to one another, and the proportions of the feet and legs  (birds rarely come close enough and stay long enough). 144982413_779048062699479_1786355540921751440_n
    • Lucas
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      BirdBoy86
      MyFirstDrawing I felt the watercolour and the legs were the hardest. What I enjoyed was paying attention to to the details and really appreciating the bird. It really helped me make a connection to the bird, and if I were taking a photograph in the field, I wouldn't have noticed the positioning of the feet, the overall positioning of the bird, and the details on the wings.
    • Cherry
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      bayogabird
      IMG_2247 I found drawing the legs and feet the most challenging. What I enjoy about drawing birds is having to pay attention to the details - the posture of the bird and the overall shape of the birds. I hope to master the feathers, bills, and feet!
    • Wesley
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      cozyCauliflower
      I felt good while sketching the birds and I think it was a satisfying result. The easiest part in my opinion was that it was a picture so I didn't have to worry about it shifting positions. What was challenging was that I didn't know how much detail to put into it. One thing that I like about sketching is that I notice things I wouldn't have otherwise if I was just passing by it on a walk. One thing that I noticed while sketching, was the talons, I never noticed how intricately they wrapped around the tree branches. The way that they wrap around to me seems so flexible and something I wouldn't dream of doing with my hands. It's cool to see how adaptations allow animals to do such things. If you're are wondering why there are two, it's because me and my mom did them together. (me top, bottom mom) PXL_20210130_010953763_2
    • Lynne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Lynnebeth
      I enjoy looking at my first drawing of this sweet little yellow warbler. It came easily and it was challenging. The distance between the beak and the eye and the claws/talons/feet were challenging. I never noticed the layers of feathers or the number of individual claws (for lack of the real term). Yes, it would make a difference with nature journaling.
    • Joan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      BirdHill83!
      I'm fairly comfortable drawing from a photo, and I enjoy having the time to look at details and try to render them—but feathers are a challenge! Drawing birds lets me discover all of the lovey details that I would miss otherwise.IMG_3982
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      corvus16
      Drawing from a photo is something that I do often as a studio artist, so I felt comfortable with it. I challenged myself a little by drawing the warbler without taking any measurements, and trying to eyeball the proportions this time. Hopefully this will be good practice for field sketching! Drawing the feather groups and overall shape came relatively easily since I've practiced before, but estimating proportions was a challenge. I find this especially tricky when deciding how to position the legs so the bird looks balanced. Without drawing this photo, I might've missed some of the wing details and subtle differences between olive and yellow tones. When nature journaling, I think noticing both details and the bigger picture is a great way to become a more attuned observer.
    • emilie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      emilieaeyelts
      It has always amazed me how you immediately look with a lot more intensity and eye for details as soon as you set out to draw an image. For me that is one of the rewards of finding time to draw and watch.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      kielbasinski
      yellow warbler
    • Student Birder
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Quiltheart
      6B131529-6CC0-45E3-8AE8-7BA848B1E578In some ways, it’s easier to draw from a photo - birds don’t sit still!  It’s easier to get the details of coloring & such.  But it’s harder to get the sense of a three dimensional living bird from a photo.   I don’t think I would have noticed how many subtle shades of color there are in the Yellow Warbler if I hadn’t drawn it.  It would have registered as mostly yellow, with black details.
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      cburgess426
      First I felt nervous, already thinking "What if it's not good enough?". Enough for what? I'm such a perfectionist! Then I just got to it. Liz had already said at one point that the eraser was my friend, whereas I had had an art teacher who always admonished "No erasers!" So I relaxed and used my eraser, which wasn't a lot. I compared eye to beak re: positioning the eye, paid lots of attention to proportion, and the different short and long wing feathers. I kind of enjoyed it!
    • Johanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      johannalane
      warbler I loved this exercise.  It was a challenge for me to allow the patience and time to draw.  I found myself rushing.  I used to draw when I was a kid and would spend hours at it.  It came easily for me to recognize details, but I didn't notice the two layers of wings/feathers initially.  A poor representation of the wing layers.  Nature journaling will reteach me patient observation. I'm looking forward to that :)
    • Abigail
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      agriffwood
      I really appreciated getting to see all the variations on the journal both in the first video and in these comments. Starting off felt a bit awkward, but I have already noticed elements (such as textural direction shifts in the wings) that I would not have noticed otherwise.
    • Jessica
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      jess504
      Honestly I felt extremely ANXIOUS just jumping straight in to drawing this bird! I think I did OK with the proportions, but it was challenging to add some of the shading in just black and white. I did find it interesting that I noticed a lot more detail (such as the very faint stripey bits around the bird's head, and it's weirdly long right toes) due to drawing the picture. If I weren't drawing it, I just would have seen a pretty yellow bird and moved on. Nature Journal Day 1
    • Sharon
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Huckster58
      4BFBA59B-87F9-4E0A-A422-1B153A86FD84Did not use the watercolors.  Not sure how, looking forward to learning how to use them.  When drawing you notice all the details.  Hope to learn how to better incorporate these details with much improved techniques.
    • Giulia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      giuliaa
      Firstexercise I can´t wait to see the evolution at the end of the course :D
    • Robin
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      turtleadventures
      This is the first time I have tried to draw a bird. Well, beyond little black "V" marks. It took me an hour and lots of zooming in. The proportions are way off, this bird probably wouldn't fly! Aside from the difficulty of getting life into a drawing, which I hope to learn, I had NO IDEA how hard it is to represent leaves, branches, much less lichen! Wow. A big lesson! I'm very glad this was from a photo. As I took an hour, no way could it be done live. I'm going to shed tears but learn much from this course!
    • Robin
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      turtleadventures
      20210121_160433
    • Ayn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      welleford
      Well. That wasn't as awful as I expected it to be :) There is so much to see in this photo. There are so many different textures and colors in the branch alone, I can imagine getting lost in the exploration.
    • Pam
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      pzbentley
      Drawing from a still subject is a bit easier, able to see more details and enjoy the process. I saw the fine details of the feathers, the feet and the beak.  I don’t think I could have seen it all from a bird on a feeder or limb, but look forward to that challenge.
    • Jacob
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Jake Vinsel
      Ines (7 years old): I felt great. I felt like a great artist.
    • Rebecca
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      rhorwitz
      This exercise was a good pre-assessment. It wasn't easy for me. It doesn't feel authentic to draw from a 2-dimensional photo. But yes, I did notice details of the bird that I wouldn't have if I wasn't trying to draw it. What I noticed were all the little stripes in the bird's plumage. On the breast there were all these light brown streaks. On top there were black streaks, and one area looked a bit greenish. Before, all I noticed was bright yellow. It's still yellow, but not crayon-box pure yellow. I wouldn't see this detail in the field, so it was helpful to draw from the photo.
    • Karly
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      KMintz311
      1. How did you feel about drawing from the photo? What came easily and what was challenging? I felt great drawing from the photo. When I draw, I prefer photographs or still images to draw from because I can take my time and really study and take in detail. The head shape, beak placement and some detailing was a bit challenging, but I found the rest to be easier. The branches and leaves came the most easily. I also found that I was very nervous to add color! I'm not good with watercolors and was worried I'd ruin the sketch. 2. Was there anything in the photo that you might not have noticed if you weren’t asked to draw it? Would this make a difference when nature journaling? I don't think I would have noticed the 3 individual toes curled on one of the warblers feet. this would make a big difference  when nature journaling because it gives you more data to take note of.IMG_0577
    • Jay
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      jpurcell
      20210114_145435
    • Melody
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      MelodyMarie
      592FE2A1-B64E-4133-ABC8-82CC149084AB
    • Alyson
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      adudek
      AD6AB711-F453-430E-B480-8E6153F8C4BBI was really nervous to begin and once I started I became lost in it. I spend most of my free time photographing all nature and so drawing from a still picture was much easier than in the field.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      gobigred22
      As I began drawing from the photo, I greatly appreciated that this wonderful little bird was not moving.  It gave me a chance to look carefully at the detail (the varied colors – usually I would just note “a yellow bird” –but now I noted the brown streaks on its breast.  Also the different kinds of feathers overlapping. And the details of the twig and the moss/lichen).  The actual drawing was a challenge….it has been a while since I have done any drawing – figuring out proportions and angles, but the more I sketched, the more I enjoyed it!  In fact it was a very relaxing exercise.  As I progress, I hope to experiment more with color. The advantage of drawing over photographing is that you spend more time actually looking at the detail of the subject.  Having just completed a digital photography course I understand the detail of getting the correct light, aperture speed, focus, etc.  Although you focus on the subject in terms of composition, you do not zero in on the detail.   I think in nature journaling I may find it difficult to draw the detail since the subject may be moving, but instead I may spend more time observing the behavior of the bird, or the environment – in fact a combination of photos and drawing on the spot may be a nice compromise.  The advantage of journaling is observing the interactions of the animals and the plants in their environment and then recording those observations.   Jan 12 2021 Yellow Warbler 1st Sketch
    • jenica
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      jenicaandic
      DBE1926B-AD39-4535-B12C-6525F36EA157 Well, this was scary to dive right in!  I really enjoyed spending time making this first drawing.  Without drawing, I would not have found the weight of his little breast, the fullness of his upper wings/shoulders/neck area.  Finding the angles was difficult.  Studying his sweet eye was joyful. It was nice to have a still subject to study.    I really enjoyed the peace that came when studying this little fellow.
    • Carla
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      carlaret
      F327858A-B4D2-448C-861A-40EF1C5B6E82 While I was initially intimidated, I enjoyed the process, I look forward to learning the skills I need to capture a subject with my hands. The drawing process made me more aware of what is around the bird, especially the lichen.
    • Chloe Hernandez
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      chloehernandez1
      IMG_6712IMG_6717I felt good about drawing from the photo, but I did struggle with the head shape, eye, and painting the back and wing feathers of the bird. I find painting feathers difficult. Also, if I wasn't asked to draw it, I wouldn't have noticed how box shaped the bird is. At first glance, it looks round and fluffy. It would make a difference journaling because if I didn’t have this photo to stare at, I probably would’ve drawn the bird more round than square.
      • Robin
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        turtleadventures
        Hi Chloe I'm a fellow student. I think you captured the bird very nicely indeed. Your foliage is amazing!
    • Antonia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      antonia.bennett
      20210110_yellow-warbler-sketch The scraggly branches were more interesting once I started drawing them and noticed several kinds of moss & lichen and the little bud joints on the leaf stems. Birds need their little claw feet in order to look like real birds. There are many layers of feathers on the warbler. Looking forward to learning drawing techniques like shading.
    • Andrew
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      afenner
      P1098182
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      gdps4849
      Okay, well. I think my bird is a little to fluffy. I'm not sure he could get off the ground.  I chose to leave him as a pencil drawing for the time being. I am freaked out about watercolors. My previous attempts at it have been less than inspiring. Bird legs are hard. I too feel that the best part of my drawing is the branch and leaves. IMG_0839
    • april
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      anewlander
      This was hard for me. I had a hard time getting the shape and the aerodynamic look of the bird. The legs were really hard too. I think the leaves were the easiest, but they still need some work. Any details from the photo on the stick were difficult and not captured. I used colored pencils. I enjoyed drawing but I think it looks like something my kids would draw. My 8 and 5 year old kids just came out and told me how great it looks. yellow warbler #1
    • Matthew
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      mvandood
      It was hard, especially the red on the chest, but fun. Drawing this made me notice the lichens on the branch. IMG_E5420[1]
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      jpwidroe
          Good Morning!  I loved drawing from the photo as the bird didn't move!  I could take my time and really study the shape, shading, and colors.  Finding a quiet, uninterrupted time to explore proved to be the most challenging aspect although the drawing itself was challenging.  Getting the lines and proportions "correct" was a task.  I didn't let myself get frustrated but just worked quietly and intently.  (Listening to Costa Rica soundscapes on Calm was helpful here!) Working from the photo allowed me to see nuances of the bird... the angle of the head, the placement of the talons on the branch, the subtle shades of the head and shoulders.  I might not have noticed these otherwise as I wouldn't have spent (or had) the time to really observe carefully.  I think the struggle with journaling moving animals, plants, living objects is just that, they move.  I imagine practice with stationary objects and photos would make me quicker with the basics so that I would have time to get to the subtleties.   Screen Shot 2021-01-06 at 9.58.14 AM
    • Deanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      deamoore
      I felt very confident  doing this drawing , the head and breast became easier for me rather than the wings and bottom . I noticed the varios tipes of moss and lichen on the branch , that would be important if you wanted to determin what species the tree is that the bird is standing on or how old that tree is.
    • Midori
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      mikudo
      1. It was fun! I'm excited to hone this skill more and more, and to keep continuing with this course. Getting the shape of the bird was harder than I anticipated; drawing and continuing with the sketch despite imperfections came more easily than I thought (as a perfectionist, I often get caught in the particulars which hinders progress and/or completion). 2. I wouldn't have noticed the geometric shape of the bird: how it's head is flatter than I would've assumed if asked to draw this from memory. The position of the tail feather and its structure was surprising as well! Very sturdy looking, and not as long as I would have anticipated. I am very excited to progress and learn more.
    • L
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Jemison
      yellow warbler
    • Tyler
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      LordVader
      1. I felt like everything I needed was in the photo but that the challenge would be in my translation into the drawing. I felt like my drawing did not capture the proper scale. I made my branch too big so some of the leaves did not make it on the paper. I also had a really hard time drawing the leaves. When it came to the bird, I didn't get the eye correct. My bird was also not fat enough. Overall, I struggled with what I should start drawing first. I thought I should have started drawing the bird first because that is the focal point of the exercise, but I started with the branch first (working left to right). 2. There were a lot of things I would not have noticed had I not been asked to draw it. Perhaps the biggest thing is that I wouldn't have noticed the impact of the focus of the picture. Clearly, the bird is the focal point, but that also manifests itself in the rest of the picture. Some of the leaves are in focus and some are not, etc. I think this does make a difference when journaling. I think this exercise taught me that I should be focusing on the subject first and the background second. When I drew my picture, I started methodically - left to right drawing the picture - because I was trying to make sure I drew the entire picture and not just the bird. Screen Shot 2021-01-04 at 4.39.44 PM
    • Kimberly
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      KimPage
      yellow warbler Fun!  I prefer using colors.  Keeping it simple worked for me!
    • Jenny
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      jenny5526
      I feel more confident drawing from a photo because the subject doesn't move.  I also felt less pressure because I know this is a pre-test of sorts. I wouldn't have noticed all the cool lichens growing on the branch, the small bill of the bird, the way the foot grasps the branch. Differences in nature journaling would be noticing not just a single subject, but all around that subject too
    • Janelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      jmazariegos
      yellow warbleI think I noticed a lot more detail by drawing it. I also realized that I couldn't quite capture the way the bird was standing on the branch.  The yellow warble that I drew looked awkward. The color of the lichen was also challenging for me.  I feel it would be easier to draw something that was standing still, though, than if it had been moving.  So the photo exercise worked for me!
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      b.kossoy
      Drawing from the photo I could take my time. Easy for me were the legs and feet on the branch.  Having the negative space between the legs was very helpful.Challenging was getting the shape of the bird, particularly the head and the breast. Noticing the streaks on the breast I might not have noticed if I wasn't drawing.  Yes, I think you see much more detail when nature journaling.
    • Wanda
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      wsbirdw
      lesson11. Overall, I enjoyed drawing from a photo. However, sometimes I noticed tensing up trying to capture details. The detail of primary and secondary feathers was particularly challenging. I also struggled with the position of the warbler; as it turned out, I drew it more upright than it was in photo. 2. I think I would not have noticed shadows; the more I looked, the more I noticed shadows and they were fun and easy to draw and they make a big difference in making the bird look more alive.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      jenkimar
      It felt a little sterile drawing from a photo that I did not take or experience first hand. The photo was a size that I could draw to size in my sketch book, so it was easy to take measurements. I didn't like the pencil I was working with and all the smudging I created, but I decided to not worry about it. If I weren't asked to draw it, I may not have noticed the different lichens and the texture of the leaves. It's those kinds of details I like to notice when in the field.   day one draw from photo yellow bird  
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      alltheprettybirds
      It felt easier after watching the evolution of other people's journals in the video.  I put up such a high bar for myself that I don't even want to start drawing but this made it more approachable.  I was surprised the bird I drew actually looked like a bird! I wouldn't have noticed how black the eye was along with the wing bars and even the branch his foot was on.  Black seems blacker.  In a photo I don't see the contrast.
    • Ashley
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Mabarret
      I notice many more details when drawing compared to simply taking a photo.  The difficulty lies in controlling my pencil.  The good thing is this bird will not move and I can take my time.
    • Tom
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      tmacfie
      I felt self conscious working, a little too aware of myself trying to draw! The whole effort was pretty challenging, the self critic hanging around most of the time. All pretty challenging; maybe it was easy to "stay with it, the project." I was drawn to the texture of the tree limbs. The invitation of nature journalling: look at the details. yRUTPohlTAKxHgchelLqUQ
    • Carmen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      cvalero
      PXL_20201231_015746533.MP1. I like drawing from a photo because I have time to pay attention to the details. I can redo something if I feel it doesn't quite lol like the photo I have plenty of time to make mistakes and to try to improve the picture. It was easy  but I don't give much detail not adding colors. 2. When I drew the bird i did notice the different kind of textures of the feathers that i might not have noticed, I also noticed the lichens on the branch and the ring around the bird's eye. I think when nature journaling I will be able to pay attention to details that otherwise I would overlook. Just looking at a picture of a bird I get the general idea but don't pay attention to those details as much.
      • Jessica
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        jess504
        I love how you captured the feathers on its back- I struggled with those!
    • linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      breakfastinbed
      image
    • Pam
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      pboard
      birdsketch1
    • Judy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      JudyNewF
      The first drawing I have attempted since school (and I am now retired). I chose not to do the surrounding branches which I now think would have framed the picture better. I liked drawing from the picture as I could zoom in a bit. The claws were fascinating and I wouldn’t have noticed them without studying the photo. I struggled to replicate the beak and to show the tilt of the head. 3381C9BC-6CA1-47C7-B29D-170EEEF3CD1F
    • Janine
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Janines07
      I had some trouble with proportions and with soft, fluffy areas   Exercise 1
    • Evangelyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      evteaches
      BC276698-30DF-4F38-A9EE-2B50A5811CFA I liked drawing from the photo because I had all the time in the world.  I could focus in and out.  My first attempt was with pencil.  I did another with watercolor. I like painting better.  It is easier to deal with the textures - I think.  It also forces journaling because you are waiting for the paint to dry.  I liked having to really think about the shape and perspective.  It was challenging to capture the fine detail - black edges of feathers, the twig.  There was so much in this simple picture so I can imagine focus on just one thing instead of trying to detail everything - or an impression of everything with focus on one.  There was so much I noticed because I was trying to draw.  The shape of the breast and belly.  The color variation around the eye.  The lichen and spots on the leaves.
    • Miriam
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      mtalalay
      IMG-2646 I enjoyed this exercise because I would love to see my progress by the end of this class. Drawing from a photo is easier than drawing from life, because there is no movement, and you can copy exactly without worrying about any changes during the drawing process. If I had not been asked to draw this, I wouldn't have noticed how the bird's claws wrapped around the branch. This would definitely make a difference in nature journaling because observation is extremely important.
    • worker33
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      worker33
      yellow warbler wk It was a good first exercise, drawing from a photograph was much simpler than a live study, since no creature would give me that much time. The detail I wouldn't have noticed was how the feet clutched the branch, an it was until the end that I realized that there was a bit of a tilt in the warbler's head that I tried to add after drawing the head and really struggling with the beak!
    • Derrick
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      fortunateson33
      IMG_8697IMG_8696
    • Lisa K
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      LisaKalil
      Details.  Paying close attention to the shapes- head shape, where the eye sits.  I had trouble making (him?) look like his head is cocked like the photo.  And patience- drawing the lines and exact colors.  The feet were so interesting to draw, and difficult.  Drawing from the photo also helped force me to look at the negative space more.  Excited for the next lesson where Liz shows us her tricks. IMG_6414
    • Sue
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      suewfan
      Drawing from a photo means I can take time to practice observing and capturing the shape and color. On the other hand, with all the details on the photo, it is challenging when trying to prioritize what to focus on and what to leave out.   Yellow Warbler 1
    • mike
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      buteomike
      jpg_20201226_0001
    • sharon
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      pipaman
      Sketching a bird is much more detailed than taking a photo.  The detail is very difficult and there is a point tool let go ... 68CFEB8C-58AD-44A5-BC15-2003B1FC0320
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      kbruins
      D26F8C97-E026-4A84-BB65-C78EF9DB854FI was happier with my sketch until I added the watercolours. I am still learning how they work. Having the photo definitely lets you see the subtle colours in the bird and in the branch. Replicating them is a whole other thing for me.
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      janaueam
      IMG_3806
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      cjmray
      Journaling-sketch 1 - Yellow Warbler
    • lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      lisamsimp
      bird sketch
    • lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      lisamsimp
      I enjoyed sketching this way. It felt freeing. The wing bar
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Fresh Basil
      1. I wasn't familiar with the paints or paintbrush, I kept struggling trying to find a comfortable way to hold the paint box.  I knew the proportions weren't quite right and that kept distracting me.  My bird looks more like a chicken, somehow. 2. There were lots of things I noticed once I started to pay attention: the way the wing feathers had layers, the different colors of the streaks.  This is one of the big advantages of drawing -- you have to really observe.   First Lesson
    • Christopher
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      coachy
      IMG_2257Drawing is not my strength. Trying to capture the spirit of the bird was what I was hoping for and I saw that many here were able to do that with posture and shape. I tried colour but painting is not my strength either. I will keep experimenting and hopefully improve as we go on. I have seen many of these warblers in the wild and I have always been struck by their bright yellow and in the males a noticeable chestnut streaky breast. These are beautiful birds to appreciate and ID as they migrate through in the spring and trying to capture the essence of one has made me appreciate it even more.
    • Christopher
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      coachy
      IMG_2257
    • Cathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      csteelewi
      Drawing from a photo is easier than trying to do a live bird; I can study it often and return to finish it when I can see if I missed a detail. I noticed the empty spaces around the bird remembering Liz's Saturday afternoon Zoom class that I took. I wouldn't have paid attention to the space around the warbler, if not drawing it. The space around the main focus will help me with the proportions of the nature scene, such as the size of legs compared to the body or size of the head versus the body.
    • Cathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      csteelewi
      P1030310
    • Lindsay
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Lindsay816
      1 Bird pre instruction Drawing slowed me down and allowed me to really see the breast markings and the shape of the birds beak. I even took time to identify that this is the male of the species. Drawing is like meditation when I'm in the flow. Had to quiet unhelpful self talk first.          
    • Cathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      still waters
      1. It was more difficult than I thought it would be.  It was challenging just to get the shape.  I erased many times. 2. There were details and subtleties that I probably would not have noticed if I was not drawing the bird.  This would make a considerable difference when nature journaling.  I can understand why each person journaling was making notes about the pictures as they were working.
    • Cathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      still waters
      Yellow Warbler
    • Reinhard
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Reinhard23
      yw (1 von 1) Very good to jump in but it was realy challenging.Advantage for drawing: I get more understanding how the bird looks like. For me ist is difficult to match the right colours. To take a good photo is not so easy , too ;). How did you feel about drawing from the photo? Drawing from a photo is much easier than to do directly in nature
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      AnnReiss
      IMG_20201217_130127567~2[1]
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      DeeLutz
      Yellow warbler 1 Dec 10 2020What I liked about this was studying the details. Frustrating to not really be able to judge scale.  Benefits of sketching is the attention you pay to the details, a photograph captures the details, but one may not really notice them since everything blends together more.  I would not have noticed the veins in the leaves, or the layers of feathers if I didn't draw this and just snapped a photo.
    • Kathryn
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      ksundin
      imageDrawing from a photo is easier than a live subject as you can study details.  Just admiring a photo, I probably would have missed the lichen on the branches.
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      dickcate
      thumbnail Photos capture detail that is difficult to achieve with a sketch, particularly from a live bird that is moving around.
    • Charlotte
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      CWMorford
      1. How did you feel about drawing from the photo? What came easily and what was challenging? The hardest was not judging myself--I'm gonna need to practice drawing without self-judgment! The eye and beak came sort of easily, the proportions of the head and body were challenging. So were the lichens--yikes. Oops. Judging again.   2. Was there anything in the photo that you might not have noticed if you weren’t asked to draw it? Would this make a difference when nature journaling? Lots: the texture of the branch, the number of colors in what I thought was simply a yellow bird. I've seen them in the wild but never had a chance to study what they actually look like in detail. Will absolutely make a difference going forward!yellow warbler
    • Mwangi
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      gathondu
      IMG_20201215_113507 - drawing the branches and leaves seemed easier than drawing the warbler - the warbler's proportions seem off, elongated in my drawing while it seems more compact in the photo - fun exercise, glad to start on this course!      
    • Cecilia
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Cecilia.V
      12.13.20.YellowWarbler Drawing at all is a challenge after not doing it in so long. Drawing from the photo was helpful because, of course, the bird is not moving, in contrast to the birds at my feeder, who dart in and out, especially the nuthatches, or the birds in the woods, who are seldom close or still. The photo made it possible to really look carefully. I can see the different parts of the wings, but I really don't know how they all fit together. This helps me identify the knowledge I need. I think if I understand and draw the structure of the wing, that will help drawing in the field -- even quick sketches. I actually loved drawing the leaves and the lichen. My frequent "interactions" with leaves and lichens probably inform my drawing.
    • Joan
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      JoanBrenchley
      IMG_1941
    • Deva
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      devamck
      IMG_4214 (1)
      • Deva
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        devamck
        It was a challenge to get the angle of the head and body, my leaves are much smaller then they should be.  If this was in nature I would not of had any chance to study it, getting the color of the Warbler or the gray on the branch or the lichens on the branch.  I normally take photo's of birds, getting the light correct and getting a good pose, you have to be fast and take a lot of photo's as they jump around from branch to branch.
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Magscs74
      How did you feel about drawing from the photo? It was a challenge which is why we are taking the course and are using it to connect with a granddaughter many miles away over Zoom. What came easily and what was challenging? The eye and beak were the easiest and the body was the hardest. Was there anything in the photo that you might not have noticed if you weren’t asked to draw it? The angle of the legs seemed unnatural so I was drawn to the fact that I had to correct my first attempt which was straight up and down. I also "felt" right away that something was off in my picture even though I thought "that can't be right" when looking at the angle of the legs at first so it kept me honest! Would this make a difference when nature journaling? It would depend on time and purpose. In a photo you might be able to go back and notice a detail but in sketching you are more focused at the time so you may note or make note of, some detail you might even miss in the photo. IMG_5817
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Susan_Bidinosti
      51981D21-70FC-4A08-9B72-8260B9F3C43D
    • Annick
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      AnnickL
      IMG_4640
    • Angie Paola
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Angie_Bird
      eab05716-a5af-476c-ad7a-1ed17c537f3a 1. Very good, it was very good to jump directly to illustrate, I wanted to do it in a more detailed way similarly, detailing from the branches to the bird itself. 2.Maybe you see the details of the moss on the branches. This could make a difference because it could give us data on the type of vegetation and even the climate, in this case, for example, the moss on the branches denotes that it was a humid environment.
    • Brandii
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      BrandiiH
      I love drawing from photos because you have time to really study every aspect - the light brown in the feathers, the pattern of black in the wings...Drawing from nature wont allow the luxury of unhurried studySketch 1
      • Joan
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        JoanBrenchley
        I love how you got the little nod of its head.  Not sure what you did to do so?  Bill profile definitely, but still, I can't see what you did beyond that (and bill profile is subtle!)  Also love the shading you did on the head and back.  Branch detail is great too!  Joan
    • MARY JANE
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      mjsmhw
      I have no idea how to insert a photo of my bird AND insert my reply to the questions.  Sorry for, perhaps, creating a little mess.  If any one can give me a few clues how to streamline inserting photo and replying I'd appreciate it.   How'd I feel about drawing from photo?  It was fine with me.  I had very little time to devote to the drawing so I just dived in and did it without recommended pencil or drawing pad.  Quick sketch wasn't too hard.  If I had tried for accuracy/details etc I may have become discouraged AND color would have been a nightmare!  I drew so fast that I didn't have time to notice details other than color of beak, feet, and reddish lines on chest.  All things I would have "seen" as a long time birder.  I was happy that I just jumped in and sketched quickly because FEAR always 1st Drawing Quick Dec 4 2020holds me back from drawing.  Drawing YES would help me see more!
    • Florence
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      flobro7
      Sorry about that. I goofed when sending. This was challenging. Birds are difficult to draw so they look correct and not cartoon like.  I draw from photos most of the time to keep as a record and go back to it later.  Probably several things I missed in the photo.  I tend to only see the basics and going back several times I notice more.
    • Florence
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      flobro7
      0781663A-EFF6-4A32-9F28-F0E75B0CF5CD
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      motto54
      DFAB6200-46A5-45E2-8313-4E07913563C8 I found it some what daunting to draw the image . I wasn’t sure my drawing would actually take the proper shape  I also had trouble with perspective I noticed more of the details on the birds feathers and also the coloring  it isn’t just a ‘yellow bird’ it has other coloring and markings yes I would be more observant than when I would have been taking a photo
    • Adrienne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      adrienne06
      8D497766-BCF9-43F4-9B5D-FD7753CE3B41I found the process to challenging but enjoyable. A couple of months ago I would have found it to be a bit more challenging, but I have been practicing drawing birds here and there using a great nature journaling resource by John Muir Laws. It’s been both relaxing and rejuvenating to spend some time practicing while my young girls are resting. The sketching portion is definitely easier for me, although I find getting proper proportions and small details to be a challenge. Painting is even more of a challenge for me, but I am loving it! Sketching and painting definitely allow me to pay better attention to the subject and feel more intimate with it than I would by simply studying the photo. I love putting than finishing dot on the eye and feeling as though the bird has come to life in front of me.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      njrives
      5AE89C2B-C71F-432F-87B5-A59A6B7B47AA_1_105_cintimidating but helpful to look at how others approach the challenge!
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Kimrinca
      MORITA WARBLER I found the exercise challenging as I haven't drawn in years and I did not excel in drawing years ago.  While trying to draw the bird, I noticed how fluffy the birds feathers were and how cute he was.  I normally don't have a chance to really look over a bird I see in real life.  I found it hard to draw the tree branch he is perched on and make it look realistic.  I have a tendency to want to draw either straight lines or smooth curves.
    • Tracy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      mrstracy23
      I was intimidated to start, but it got easier once I began. Drawing the warbler came more easily than the branch and leaves. I have to fight my perfectionism, and often it feels better if I just approach it a bit more intuitively. If I hadn't have drawn it, I don't think I'd have noticed so much contrast in the leaves and branches. 20201202_220049
    • Sherrie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      HopeKell222
      It's been a couple of years since my last art class. Looking forward to using my water colors again.20201201_122830
    • Clare
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      jeremiadsoul
      I felt a little nervous about drawing from the photo, jumping right in as it were.  The most challenging part was just putting pencil to paper.  Once I got the pencil moving, making short strokes that formed shapes, I could feel things relaxing a bit.  The more I relaxed and looked at the photo, the more I was able to notice little details.  There were little holes in the leaves from bugs.  The warbler's feathers were tufted and soft looking near its legs, whereas the feathers on its back were sharp, layered precisely on top of one another.  When I first looked at the photo, all I saw was yellow, but as I drew and looked more, I noticed little fine colorations such as the brown streaks on its breast, black layers in its folded up wings. I also was able to notice how large its eye was compared to the size of its head!  Drawing the details makes such a huge difference because it can help with identifying whatever it is you are drawing.yellow warbler
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      mararbizu
        The bird was easy to draw. The challenging was to draw the logs, because of the shape, textura and that different kinds of lichen.
        I didn’t drawn the logs and leaves
        I consider write some characteristics of the bird, log and lichen
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      mararbizu
      0727D312-C79D-419B-A7AE-8FFA73D19E27
    • Maggie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Maggie_Doherty
      1. I have to admit that I was nervous to draw without any instruction as I do not know how to draw. So the entire exercise proved to be a challenge, including overcoming the challenge to just dive in and try to capture the bird's form and expression. I had difficulties capturing its shape and hope to learn how to do this as we make our way through the course but I kept at it. I really want to try and sketch what I felt looked like a smile or smirk on its face. Yes, I'm likely anthropomorphizing but I felt like there was a real liveliness to the bird. I felt more comfortable trying to sketch the branches and leaves but wanted to fully capture those details like the lichen and bends of the branches. The subtleties of the whole photo--from the way the warbler's feet curled around the branches to the vibrant green pouf of lichen--commanded my attention. Now if only my I could gain the artistic skill to render all of it on the page. 2. I likely would have overlooked the way the warbler's feet grasped the branch and the intricacies of its claws. Another detail was the branch itself -- I was really "drawn" (excuse the pun) to its shape and various textures. YWarblerFirstExercise
    • Patti
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      owlmamma
      Photos capture the scene in a millisecond! Birds don’t stand still typically, so I can snap off dozens of shots while they flit through the bushes or trees, or hop on the ground. My focus while photographing is on the lighting, focus, and peering through the aperture to frame the subject. While photographing I’m not focused on the feel of the air, or gregarious sounds of the birds, or smell of the woods. And I’m in constant motion. When sketching my ears and nose as well as eyes are activated. I am taking note of scale and position of the bird; its stance, its shape, and noticing detail such as the alignment of the eye to the beak. Could this have an effect on how the bird is able to feed? Yes, sketching opens my mind to ask other questions beyond creating a photo that captures light, color and composition. 83B5F4D9-1B1F-44E4-89F3-4E46746F8AFB
    • Erin
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      erinfoxmann
      nature journaling pre-assessment E Foxmann
    • BARBARA
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      DrWhooo!
      Bird acad warbler Nov272020
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      amo500
      I have usually sketched from photos, so I have a little more comfort there with a still image, and a pencil. The beak was a surprising little challenge - as it was initially wider than the little pincer-like warbler feature I was first going for. I think the thing I really enjoy about journaling over photographs is the labeling of other things - like the lichens, and the tree species (even if unknown). Adding features like time/date/weather, maybe the trail etc. I am most nervous about the real-life drawing in situ - the figure/motion drawings is something I've never done.warb1
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      lindalbrett
      I liked drawing from the photo as it gave me lots of time without movement of the bird.  I felt happy tackling this subject.  Appreciating the little feet wrapped around the branch. Getting the proportions of the body-head-wings was challenging but taking the idea that the bird structure is geometric -various forms of circles and ovals helped. In particular it was challenging  was achieving that slight gesture of the head to the right and the relation of beak to the eye and the eye was the hardest to enliven.
      • What drawing helped me notice was the way the wing is buried in the shape of the body.  And the neat little toes on the branch.imageimage
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      Margaret mackenzie
      I felt fine about drawing from the photo. It took a long time to get the dimensions of the bird right and I don't have it right yet but I stopped after making 2 copies of it. I noticed the wing structure more and where the wing starts and ends at. I noticed how far back the legs are situated on the warbler. I noticed the placement of the eye in relation to the bill. I tried to notice the relationships in the anatomy of the bird. I find the feathers in the wing difficult and want to simplify it. In a photo I think it's harder to simplify than if I had been copying a  drawing. Would it make a difference when nature journaling? Well, good question. That's why I'm taking the course. I want to be more exact in the drawings I make of birds. Wings and feather structures have defeated me and I simplify as much as possible. It doesn't make a difference to my nature journaling in so far as I'm usually trying to tell a story, something that happened and is of interest to me, some behaviour or event I want to capture. Still, I would like to have a better idea of how to draw the bird more accurately. IMG_1192IMG_1193
    • Suzanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      SuzanneD99
      20201123-IMG_7255
    • Audrey
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      wren01
      20201120_223701_Burst01I love drawing from photos because you can take as long as you want! I had a little trouble getting the body shape right at first, but once I got it filling in the details was fairly easy. I don't think I would have noticed that some of the leaves have bug bites in them if I had not taken the time to draw it.
    • Blanca
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      BlancaManzanilla
      Photos are quicker to take although if you want a nice high res photo, it takes time. Drawings - details! Nov 19/20 - My first yellow warbler drawing. Yellow Warbler #1 - course
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Library Lady 3232
      It is easier to draw than a real bird because it doesn't move. If I am going to paint or draw something, I often snap a picture with my I phone. I don't think I would have noticed the moss or fungi if drawing in the moment for the journal WIN_20201119_14_50_42_Pro
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      DaveRich
      DSCN4249
      • David
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        DaveRich
        I thought that I had submitted this earlier, but could not find it. I did not mean to submit it twice though.  How do I delete one?
      • David
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        DaveRich

        @David I changed journals after this drawing as I did not totally like the course paper I had in this journal.

    • Becky
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      rfranks420
      Drawing from the photo made me really pay attention to small details.  It was challenging to get the proportions right - but fun to try.  Thank goodness for erasers!  :)IMG_5852
    • Lynn
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      LynnBushoven
      The photograph allowed me to get a sense of how the bird grips with strength in its legs and to get a closer look at the softest of the feathers and patterns os the feathers.image
    • Ellen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      ellenreeves
      It was challenging to get the proportions right.  I didn't know how to get the shadings right either.  I know that details, such as the color of certain feathers and the striping are important in bird ID but it was hard to get them right in my drawing.  The beak I drew was not like the beak in the photo!
    • Dale
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Dale Naomi
      fullsizeoutput_6614
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Zimbob407
      I might not have noticed how the wing flows into the body and the overall balance of the figure. Also the expression of the face, which I was not able to capture well.Document_2020-11-13_185634
    • Lindy
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      lindyjs
      It was hard to get the proportions right and to show shading without using colour.  As others have said, because the bird isn't moving it's easier to observe.   I want to learn how to do this better because I think I'll be doing this a lot from photos at the beginning
    • Teresa
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      TCostes5
      It was fun!  I found it easy to get the basic shape, but I struggled with the details of the feathers, particularly the wings. The feet were challenging too!  Drawing helped me notice how the feet are folded around the branch and how the wing feathers are stacked in layers. P1400753
    • Ana
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      averdejo
      1 - Yellow warbler
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      StarN1eye
      I struggled most with the warbler’s proportions and feet. Also challenging, how do you capture and  represent feathers with a pencil? Drawing a active bird in nature I imagine will be a lot harder. One thing I did notice studying the photo was the ring encircling the warbler’s eye. image
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      seadahl80
      IMG_E7212I felt very comfortable drawing from the photo as this the predominant way I  practice drawing.  I find capturing the basic shape and position to be fairly easy, but am more challenged by creating shading, dimension and details without feeling like the drawing becomes over-worked.  If I hadn't drawn the photo I would not have noticed the layers and sections of feathers in as much detail, nor would I have noticed the array of lichen present on the twig.  If one of the purposes of nature journaling is to understand the subject more deeply, then drawing the subject is a way to be focus to details that would other wise be looked over.
    • Sonia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      lopes_sonia
      had lots of fun with this exercise. Hard to give the tridimensional aspect and the wing details.
    • kevin
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      kevinw
      Proportions were difficult, as was conveying the sort of tilt of the bird's head, and the color of the bird when drawing with pencil.
    • kevin
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      kevinw
      bird
    • Todd
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      toddm49
      Photo on 11-1-20 at 5.10 PM Definitely a fun exercise!I can see how spending more time with a photo can yield greater detail; real-life, maybe not so much given how long the subject stays still :)
    • Ryann
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      skippyrd
      I rather liked drawing from the photo, the bird couldn't fly away!  Especially a warbler, they move so fast!  The details were challenging, specifically the feathers on the wings. As I was drawing I noticed it looked like the bird was looking back over his/her shoulder at the photographer based on how the body was positioned away but the head was turned.  I also noticed so much detail in the branch, the fungus, lichen - I would like to spend time on more identification around that as well as keep up with my bird ID.WIN_20201101_13_59_15_Pro
    • Isa
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      icheren
      1. I felt challenged to have the bird look like the picture- it was easier since the bird was frozen in time--challenging because I struggle to draw proportionately 2. I noticed the colors on the chest, also the  details of the lichen and moss on the branch it was sitting on. This focus helps with seeing beyond the bright obvious subject, also may share details about the environment.
    • joy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      jggoodsell
      IMG_1260 Drawing from a photo is easier in some respects because the bird stays still and you can take your time looking at details. It is more difficult to see how it behaves and see what the margins of the wings were colored. Proportions are difficult for me. I was interrupted when I started the drawing and when I went back I tried to correct them. Still not happy but not bad for the first time. I am enjoying that sketching slows you down and gives you an opportunity to really notice small details. Photos catch everything all at once but I generally don't spend as much time really looking at them.
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Birdie1234
      13B4CE36-BC93-40AD-B6B6-638BA64F8F74_1_201_a Drawing from a photo was good because the subject didn't move. I could take as long as needed to get the details right. The easiest parts were the items that were in the foreground and were seen head-on or in profile; flat leaves and even the bird itself. I find the items that are at an angle, like bend leaves and things that show different sides, like the bird's little talons, a bit more challenging. Even though I watch birds all the time, I noticed the various wing feathers more than I might in real life. Yes, it may make a difference; I might annotate the drawing if I noticed them.
    • Kristina
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      raptorfan14
      This is my first hand drawing of anything in a long time! Drawing from the photo was definitely easier than from a live bird. I still had trouble with the shapes and proportions of the different parts of the bird (i.e. the bill) and getting the subtle transitions of the coloring on the nape and back. I wouldn't have paid as much attention to that yellow to greenish/gray color transition and the reddish brown striping on the chest if I weren't drawing. I would like to capture as much detail as possible with journaling, it will be challenging to try this in the wild with live birds!IMG_3875 (2)
    • Tiffany
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      ainwena
      image So, this entire piece was challenging.  I was able to block out the branches ok but my proportions were way off.  Next time I would do this landscape style.  I kind of gave up on the colored pencils after a bit.  They made everything muddy and I struggled with details with them.  I don’t think I am going to use them for awhile.   The leaves and branches were easier to draw but the bird not so much.  The legs are the best feature.  Drawing from a static image was good because I could zoom in, but it was inside and I wasn’t relaxed at all.  Photos maybe good for filling in tiny details later, I think.  I am not sure I would have seen the darker and lighter shades in the bird coloring out in the field.
    • Pat
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Pat.Martin
      IMG_2144I noticed leaf shadow and veining and where bugs had eaten lea leaf. I noticed flatness and roundness of the bird but did'nt capture it quite enough.  I draw and paint a lot from photos and try to notice all details.  I enjoy this game.  How can we do that in nature?  light shifts, things move away, plus...I'm too far away to see any details.  Am I getting ahead of us?
    • Kristen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      kristen.drechsler
      Drawing from a photo does have the advantage of the subject being still, but I did not feel much connection to the photo. It is much less exciting to see a photo of a bird than to see one in real life. If I had not been drawing the bird from the photo I would not have payed as much attention to the shape of the bird or the subtle color differences between the feathers. I'm not certain I would have noticed the bird's claws wrapped around the branch. Noticing the intricate details about the world around us is part of the point of nature journaling. If you miss those details it is like knowing the melody of a song and only half the lyrics. 20201027_170616
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      docarkin
      I liked drawing from the photo. The bird stood still, and I was able to see much more than I usually do when observing birds in the wild or at the feeder. I noticed the subtle change from yellow in the face to darker shades on the nape and back. Also the lichen and moss on the branch are things I would not have taken note of if not for drawing. I like "seeing" more, but am concerned bout the 50 minutes it took me to sketch this pretty little bird. Perhaps I need to be more patient, and just enjoy the experience....20201027_190811
    • Lilly
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Lmull1219
      I felt comfortable drawing from a photo, as I take my own photos of birds to draw from. This would make a difference in nature journaling for me, as I love to put so much detail into drawings. It's hard for me to sketch something I see for about 5 seconds. 20201027_100806
    • Kyoko
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Kyoko Ode
      • It is my very first drawing! I am very glad to finally start. I could take time seeing the details in the photos. The disadvantage is that I couldn't hear the sound and smell the nature, drawing it in my room.
      • I wouldn't have noticed all the details of the bird. Yes it will make a big difference when nature journaling.
      • YellowWarbler
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      sunolen
      My retirement goals included learning to watercolor and doing creative writing. I am a long-time though casual birder and recently moved to the country in western Washington state, where I live on five acres at the end of a half-mile dirt road. Many birds, lots of natural wonders everywhere I look (see photo below - it mushroom time at the farmette). This class is a perfect fit for where I am. When I was a grad student in the 80s I took a biological illustration course, which I loved. Doing the first sketch assignment after listening to the journalers and seeing their work, I started to remember lessons learned almost 40 years ago, drawing bugs (from specimens) and other critters (from photographs). They held still, like the warbler in this assignment20201018_09444020201025_190512. I am looking forward to learning how to capture a moving subject in some way that not only looks like the subject but catches something about the movement.
    • Rachel
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      rvblakey
      I enjoyed it, the most challenging thing was trying to figure out how to convey textures. I had no idea how to go about the lichen and even just the texture of the branches, ended up being lazy and just coloring it in. Similarly, looking at the warbler's plumage, I struggled to show the soft feathers, the different types of striations, shading differences and just different feather textures. Overall, I was so happy that my warbler looked like a bird! IMG_8076
    • Kelli
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      KelliDeferme
      5FB2023C-A3A3-42D9-9855-448522015CE5 I found myself anxious to get every detail right right off the bat.  As I kept drawing it was easier to relax and enjoy the process.  I enjoyed drawing his little feet and legs a lot.  I would not have noticed the details in the leaves and branches, the wispy little underbelly feathers, or the way his beak looks just like a little black oil sunflower seed.
      • Kelli
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        KelliDeferme
        21212865-D39C-4128-AD68-F5E915DCE9C0 I liked the suggestion posted about adding labels.. I also added another little section for myself with questions I have.. ie..”how do I add shape and dimension to leaves...how do I get them to look folded?”
    • Kelly
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      kellyhornaday
      1. I imagine that drawing from a photo is pretty different from drawing subjects in real time. I felt like I had lots of time, but live subject probably won’t be so cooperative. Getting the slightly turning posture of the bird was really hard (don’t think I quite got it) 2. I would not have paid as much attention to shape and proportions and details of markings if I has not drawn it. I think for nature journaling, noticing and capturing details is part of the point.35BADDE2-962D-49F5-9958-0B2DF24295D1
    • Joyce
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      drjkill1
      1. I was self-conscious at first.  I haven't drawn in decades.  The face was the hardest to draw.  I couldn't get the right shape/proportion.  I wasn't sure where to start so I began with the branches so that I would have an anchor for the bird. My shading technique is not good, but it will probably come back to me faster than some other things. 2. So many things I would not have noticed: basic shape, proportions, where the wing starts. 3.  Sure I will be more conscious of detail in both what I sketch and what I write about.
    • Candy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Candy.schrank
      It is a challenge to render yellow and bright colors of the bird using only a pencil whereas light/dark and texture of branches and leaves more fruitful and less challenging.
    • Candy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Candy.schrank
      20201023_152011
    • Norma
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      wwwilma
      IMG_6505
    • Regina
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Njbloodhound
      I enjoyed drawing the Yellow Warbler. I didn't get the scale of the overall space relative to the bird correct. The bird ended up bigger that it was relative to the branch, in the photo. It wasn't a bad thing, but I intended to get the proportions as in the photo. I hadn't noticed the bird's claws until sketching them. They're really interesting! Photos have the advantage of capturing fleeting details that would be hard to see in a living, moving bird.first drawing exercise
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      jenneve58
      • I think it was a good place to start as you could study at your leisure knowing it would not fly away. Can’t say this was easy. Challenging how to convey textures, curves, proportions. E7382D71-A6CD-4341-A95C-B052A63C5F022. I spent more time looking at textures and how things were put together.
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      amykarst
      Well. He looks like a happy bird...Photo on 10-19-20 at 8.54 PM
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      amykarst
      I really wish the bird was facing the other direction! Why is this so difficult? Picture later. Still erasing!  :(
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Bnoel2
      I was able to notice a lot more detail. Zooming in on the picture helped. It was easy to see the geometrical shapes, oval for the body and a smaller oval for the head. It was challenging to capture the softness of the feathers. I ended up using short strokes. For some reason the beak was challenging and I had to draw is a few times before I got it somewhat ok. The proportions between the body and the legs are off. I wouldn’t have noticed the little hole in the beak if I hadn’t drawn it. I also wouldn’t have noticed the brown stripes in the lower body along the feathers either. Yes, not getting the hole in the beak would have been an important omission.EB750406-080D-4F79-BF87-01284699BEC3
    • Thomas
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      dr.schreiter
      yellowWarbler Intended to draw electronically - with a new tool and a new technique. Came out better than expected, but still a long way to go.
    • Meriwether
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      mmbrown
      imageI felt very intimidated, so I started with drawing the branch/leaves.  I noticed the shapes/textures of one leaf, the bark and the branch.  The warbler is so vivid and dynamic in the photo.  As I was drawing, I gained some confidence by focusing on the branch.  The most challenging thing is actually posting my sketch!
    • Steven
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      sstadler
      1.  I need a lot of practice of course!  But it looks much better than I thought it would, YaY!  The feeling of looking at the small details and trying to capture them in the drawing is fun, interesting, and frustrating all at the same time.  How do I make it look like that?  is the frustrating part, but I have confidence that I will learn how to improve that in this course.  It is really fun to see how much better this looks than I thought it would. 2.  I had recently watched the bird identification courses for size and shape, and colors and patterns, and there were some clues in those courses that helped me get some of the proportions better, which I would have struggled with so much more before.  For example, the distance from the back of the eye to the front of the head compared to the length of the bill or beak.  Is it a bill or a beak??  Hmmm.  Maybe it's a bill on a duck and a beak on everything else?  Something to look for in the course.
    • Heather
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      hollidog
      • This is a very familiar bird to me, and I was smiling as I drew it.  The bird was still, in nature this little guy is always moving. I liked all the leaves too. I noticed the shadows on the leaves and the texture of the branches.
    • Jim
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Jim_Platt
      1.  Drawing from a photo makes it easier to see details - the bird didn't move or quickly fly away and the lighting was constant.  I don't think anything came easy or particularly challenging (I've not artistic training), although getting a three dimensional 'look' to the drawing seemed difficult. 2.  I doubt I would have paid much attention to the proportions or the feather markings.  And yes, that will make a difference in my journaling. PXL_20201011_204343423
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      JCharnley
      When drawing from a photo you don’t have the problem of the subject you are drawing moving. What was most challenging is getting the proportions right and the bird’s head is slightly turned and it is hard to get that effect in the drawing. I would not have noticed the more subtle colored patterns of the feathers. It might not make a great difference in nature journaling to get all the colored patterns maybe just the more prominent ones.YellowWarbler
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Mary17
      It was a good exercise & I’m looking forward to improving my skills especially in relation to proportions.C7720BC9-B9DF-4A64-AD00-B493807A9633
      • amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        amykarst
        Hi Mary! I love your drawing. Did you use charcoal for it? Your black is so bold. Great work! Amy
    • laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 31
      Vagabondgirl
      IMG_0703I looked forward to this evening's warbler foibles... say that 10 times fast! Sketching and painting is the perfect end to a busy day. A full hour of figuring out how my watercolour pencils work. The first bird I've ever done... and I'm a bit surprised at myself... it looks like a warbler! It isn't a Robert Bateman, but I kind of like its amateur folksy quality. There was a lot I wouldn't have noticed without trying to draw it. The nails, the angle of the legs, the ruddy streaks on the breast. I think the attention to detail is wonderfully meditative and it will impact my journalling for the better. It also makes vice-presidential debates much more palatable to listen to... regardless of which side you're rooting for.
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      plattsa
      I enjoyed drawing this little guy.  I have a background in art, but it's been a long time since I've actually drawn anything.  It was a challenge recalling the techniques I had learned along the way.  I probably would have not noticed the branches and leaves as much and concentrated on observing the warbler, and that would make a difference in the "story" you are trying to convey of the moment.
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      plattsa
      Yellow Warbler
    • Nicole
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      NicoleMahoney
      I enjoyed trying to draw this bird, but it was hard to get the proportions right. The beak and eye placement were difficult too! I enjoyed seeing the details, especially in the color patterns and would not have noticed these details if not drawing. Fun!IMG_0337
    • Deb
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      AZGal01
      Who thought drawing with pencil could be so much fun?! Thank heavens the bird did not take flight and I had an eraser. As a lifelong birder, I have never really drawn birds before. It really solidifies your appreciation for this male yellow warbler....which happens to be migrating thru my neck of the woods right now. yellowwarbler
    • Jackie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      JackieHunter
      I noticed a lot more detail drawing the bird than I thought that I would. Little things like the birds talons, and the way the colours are.
    • Jackie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      JackieHunter
      IMG_3738
    • Johanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Johanna23
      I didn't notice lots of details at first, including the rusty stripes on the bird's breast, the white and orange moss on the branch and the way the leaves attach to the twig, the details of the birds feet etc.  Drawing is so much better at making you look.
    • Cindy
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      cduffy
      In drawing from the photo I don't need to worry about my subject moving. To me at this point most challenging is getting the proportions correct. I always feel my drawing is a little off. By drawing the bird I become very aware of its shape and shading. There are so many things about drawing that increase your awareness and would otherwise go unnoticed,
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      DaveRich
      DSCN4249
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      DaveRich
      I could not resist adding color. I have tried photographing yellow warblers once or twice, but had better luck with Wilson's warbler. Drawing them from life is pretty much impossible. Neat photo and good practice.  
    • laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      larabelle
      Such great therapy ! Not sure when enough is enough.  I zoomed in after I thought I was finished and then saw so much  detail I had missed. So much to observe and see . Makes me want to be able to name the body parts correctly - I have some homework to😊AFEB4E2D-B78D-4043-BB17-D357E4A9D73B
    • Chari
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      norgardc
      Jumping into the drawing was scary.  However, once I began the sketch, I found myself seeing details in the photo that I didn't initially notice.  I was so focused on the drawing that I lost track of time--a good thing.  The initial outline of the Yellow Warbler and branches/leaves was relatively easy.  What I found most difficult was the level of detail--deciding how much detail to include and how to show the differences in textures and colors with only a pencil.  I would not have noticed some of the detail, especially in the branches and leaves if I weren't drawing the photo.
    • sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      slounsbery
      It was so scary! I have not picked up a pencil in so long and I was anxious.  But after just diving in and concentrating it felt like meditation. I can see how practice will bring calmness and a more relaxed style.  So much more is seen when drawing, the texture of the branches, the slope of the back, the fluffy and stiff feathers. I am going to love this class! I look forward to adding color. IMG_0777
      • Rachel
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        rvblakey
        This drawing is awesome, I love how how you captured all different feather textures and patterns!
    • Melanie
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Enid Melanie
      first attempt Getting the proportions right was most difficult. I would not have noticed the black in the wing feathers and the brown on the bird's belly if I hadn't paid such great attention to it trying to capture it. I kept thinking that I probably would not have noticed any of this either, had the bird been sitting on a twig near me, about to fly off any second.
    • Sandra
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      sjessop
      I felt both relieved the subject wasn't moving, and worried about trying to do everything I could see.  The angle of legs and toes is always challenging.  If I wasn't asked to draw from the photo I wouldn't see how the toes hang over and curl around the branch.  Also the spots on the leaves and just how much lichen there was!  I believe nature journaling gives you the chance to find out what interests you most.  I can't wait to see how this works in the field!  nature journaling 1 warbler crop
      • Melanie
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        Enid Melanie
        Wow! This looks as if you've been journaling for years! Beautiful.
    • Erin
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      erinallen28
      Drawing from a photograph was easier than thinking about drawing a moving subject!  Although - it was still intimidating to try to draw a subject as complex as a bird, branch leaves and multiple lichen/epiphytes!   I found it easy to block out the shapes and posture of the bird and legs.  I like looking at the outlines of different sections.  However, I spent so much time on the bird, that I realized by branch and leaves were out of proportion after the fact.  I tried to stop before overworking everything, but still fell into the trap of drawing from memory when I got to the leaves.   If actually nature journaling, the subject is moving!!!  ah!
    • Rosalie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      rowiepaints
      I liked doing the drawing but didn't get the angle of the birds body correct. Drawing makes you look at the details, the feathers, the coloring.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LindaWorden
      Yellow Warbler
      • Melanie
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        Enid Melanie
        Very nice!!! I also like that you thought of labelling the colours.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LindaWorden
      It always takes me a long time to sketch, so it is easier for me to draw from a picture.  I need more practice so that I can move quicker and also with moving objects.
    • Marta
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      MartaOli
      First_drawing_YellowWarbler_Marta Drawing from the photo seemed easier at first. I tried to use the circle/ egg shape suggestion from the earlier video. I like the result, although my bird looks a bit fatter! The beak is quite difficult! If I wasn't asked to draw, I probably wouldn't have noticed it in detail. Drawing makes me look at things in another way; a better way; and it makes me want to stay "there", drawing and drawing...
    • Wendy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      SmithWendy
      imageI'm most comfortable drawing with just pencil, but I am going to try and challenge myself to add more colours to my work. To draw this, I started by drawing the negative space between the warbler and the branches it's perched on. I tried starting with the eye at first but my proportions seems really off. This other approach helped me and trained my eye-hand coordination, which needs more practice too. This was a fun exercise, but I am a slow drawer so doing moving animals is a bit daunting... though, I am excited to give it a try and practice more to improve! I love bird watching and identifying plants so this course will definitely be worthwhile!
    • Jen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      jenmesskies
      There are 2 of us doing the course together- mama and 13 year old son:) 1. It was really fun. Getting the basic shape of the bird was really easy but the lighting was more challenging. As the adult who doesn't really draw- it was frustrating to try and put down on paper what I was seeing in the photo in an accurate way. 2. The shape of some of the feathers. Striping on the breast feathers. addisonjen
      • Melanie
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        Enid Melanie
        Great work, both of you! My kids (10 and 12) might also join me soon :)
    • paula
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      pfomby
      6DE1C2E2-8E9C-478D-8F41-C6FB1D617052
    • Janice
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      JaniceMcDll
      EF4B8228-88C2-4AEF-AAE6-C6D3B6D68209
    • LAUREN
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      larledge
      9FC8A50C-0648-4027-BAA5-15C7E6BB4102
    • Maria
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      mariavergara1
      WhatsApp Image 2020-09-15 at 1.12.54 PM
    • Maria
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      mariavergara1
      This would be so difficult in the field, I need time to draw and look at details :p
    • KL
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      klgarlock
      fullsizeoutput_a25
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      rflora5709
      Proportions were tough to grab, I believe I captured the general shape of the bird. I had difficulty showing the curves and bends in the individual leaves.Yellow Wabler Drawing 1 09.08.20
    • Caroline
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      benjaminboies
      Pretty easy to draw as it didn't move :) Colouring with my son's pencils was challenging (it's Labour Day here, so can't go to the store to buy watercolor, oh well). Loved the details of the "fur" around the eyes, as well as the claws. Not sure I would have noticed had it been a bird just passing by. I would say that these are probably the type of details that are critical to identifying birds properly.IMG_7795
    • Hilary
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      sacmonument
      IMG-8370I enjoyed drawing this bird and felt like it was a reasonable assignment due to it's common "bird shape."  Having said that, starting is always the challenge for me and drawing the overall shape was a challenge. I feel like the colors were the easy part. I debated on whether or not to draw the tree branches, but I decided against it. I think it was easier to draw because it wasn't moving. Which is why I tend to draw flowers more! I have a hard enough time identifying birds as it is~
    • Adrienne
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Adrienne291
      Drawing from the photo wasn't too difficult, because it is a photo and therefore the bird doesn't move. However, I still didn't get the angle of the face (bill and eyes) right. The claws/feet were also challenging for me. However, I'd say it's a good start and the overall result looks like the yellow warbler (except not colored). I noticed the feet and the bill more when I drew it, as well as the way the wings lay (although mine might be lifted a little). I didn't do the "drawing broad shapes first" approach, but I wonder if it would be faster in the field. Drawing the bird definitely makes me more familiar with the yellow warbler's shape, even though I've seen them so many times. Yellow Warbler Drawing 1
    • Tara
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      taprilet
      Drawing animals is completely new to me so it was interesting trying to use concepts of proportions on a new shape for me. I noticed the rule of thirds for drawing human faces pretty much applied to a birds face which I found interesting!20200902_180851 (1)
    • Linda A
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      MiamiLin
      I found drawing from a photo gave me time to look at it and notice color, shape, the lines on its breast.  After drawing it, I tried using watercolor to add color notes.  My experience is with oils not watercolor, and need to realize it has to dry so the darks don't run all into the light colors. Maybe using watercolor pencils will help with controlling this? Lesson 1 yellow warbler
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      kscott
      My 6yo wanted to join me in this class and so we went with the bigger pieces of paper, and we both have already learned so much.  Ignore the plentitude of zucchinis and zuke bread in the background.  Part of why I'm enjoying this so much is a) my daughter is totally interested and is working through some learning curves as I work through my own and b) I'm forcing myself to slow down and look at things in a different way.  I love that we all have our own different styles and embrace them all.  An image on the computer screen for some reason is more straight forward for me... I can disassociate from the image - the feet with their upturned toes in the back - the different colors in the beak, the beautiful green background - I find it difficult to find the right colors yet, but it is good to sit with an image for a while and try to tease it apart. Lesson 1 Art
    • Leslie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      lwspencer
      I enjoyed drawing from a photo.  I could focus on it seeing details.  Drawing it came fairly easily.  A little challenging was the intricate lined feather pattern.  Also with just pencil, obviously the color was missing, thus drawing with pencil trying to distinguish the different colors black and reddish, was a challenge.  I might have not noticed the little clawed feet, the exact proportions of the bird, and the detailed coloring, had I not been asked to draw it.  Since birds in nature rarely sit still, these details might be missed when nature journaling.
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      bbcastleman1
      5A49E16A-917E-4357-86F9-BF4A83E88442It was easy to get lost in the detail and miss the overall shape. Nice to notice the many layers and different angles of the wings.  Thanks to the bird for HOLDING STILL.  😇
    • mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      universe19
      I would have best seen the image in the field but up close. I have learning disabilities galore when it comes to spatial, visualization . Drawing will be challenge but not the writing. I just did a pencil drawing, no color, in effort to draw warbler. As it's in my journal I don't know how to upload, but think I'll try another sketch as mine is so tight and restricted
    • Lumi
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      lumifox
      1. I typically draw from photo or memory, but looking at a screen too long gives me awful headaches. Getting the tail’s shape right was hard, but the other parts went okay. 2. I might not noticed the many shades  of yellow on the chest and wings, but I did a lot more as I colored. It would, for me at least, because it would not be as accurate as I would want it to be. D6AB66DB-8A1E-4108-BC60-0E477AE6C4CE
    • Janice
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Jpolletta
      the process was daunting, as it has been years since picking up a pencil and drawing.  but in another sense, it was exciting as I paid much more attention to the size shape and details, color of the bill and legs, shape of the breast length of the tail shape of the leaves etc.  I enjoyed it...rather than worrying about the exactness and outcome.
    • Kimmai
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      KimmaiNunnery
      IMG_4024 How did you feel about drawing from the photo? I prefer to be outside verse at my computer. (I teach online due to covid, and spend too much time on my chromebook! ) What came easily and what was challenging? I feel more confident in plants than birds, I think the dark black lines draw you into this sketch.I  could not figure the correct shape or size for the head of this bird. Was there anything in the photo that you might not have noticed if you weren’t asked to draw it? Would this make a difference when nature journaling? I really began to look at where the tail wad located and the shape of the break. I also began to notice the colors and lichen on the tree branch. The shades of yellow on the bird's feathers.
    • Sara
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      saradonohoe
      I have a hard time capturing the right scale from a picture . It's nice the bird isn't moving! Felt like I captured a "feel" here, not necessarily a scientific sketch. Still working on that.Lesson 1
    • Deepa
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      DeepaIyer
      The nice thing about drawing from the photo was that the bird was still :) And so close up that many tiny details became visible. All I had with me today was a box of 6 crayon colours so I tried to make do with what I had. Realised that there was a lot to learn and capture in how the feathers in the wings were laid out. Realised the background needed more work to become smooth. Realised I had to learn a lot about crayons. Wondered how to capture the expression in the birds eye. Details may not always be so visible in nature journalling as our subjects will be far away and on the move. Drawing made me pay attention to all the small details and see them carefully . Yellow warbler Aug 20 1
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      LinElin
      I liked drawing from the photo as it allowed me to really look at details. Perspective in regard to orientation of beak and legs did not come easily, and I found I kept wanting to tweak the drawing (my perfectionist side) and finally had to lay the pencil down. Even though I didn't add color in this drawing, I realized how many shades of yellow this "yellow bird" has that I may not have seen if it was on the wing.unnamed (1)
    • Peggy
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      charliewest52
      2 The thin lines on the wings 1. The beak was ard
    • Manuel
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      molles
      I am just getting back to the lessons and wanted to pair my drawing with my original reply: Yellow warbler1I enjoyed drawing from the photo, since I could focus on details without having to rely on my memory or worrying about the bird flying off. The easiest was approximating the general shape of the warbler. The more challenging aspects were reproducing the relative orientations of the different parts of the anatomy: head angle, leg placement, layering of wing feathers, and eye size direction of gaze. My color and color distribution was off as well.   There were so many details I would have missed, if I had not attempted to draw the warbler, not that I was able to reproduce them in my drawing. I do think that including sketches in my nature journals would improve them a lot.
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Mswearin
      E8F13D32-0784-43AC-9BD6-CAD1A2F38635It was difficult to decide where to begin. I chose the branch. The feet were surprisingly easier than I thought and the part that seemed easy at a glance proved elusive. I could not get the head shape right from my eyes to the paper. The proportion fell short and while quick sketching I don’t erase so he has more of a dove shape. In the wild I’m certain to have missed the claws just so on the branch and those burnished streaks on the throat as individual marks. Looking forward to instruction on proportion and pencil techniques.
    • Cecilia
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Cyanocoraxyncas11
      IMG_20200814_161336_resized_20200814_041432621
    • Kay
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      rkmoss
      Yellow Warbler 8.9.20
    • carmen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      rose95
      A188515C-4195-4BA8-8C3C-878CF44ED5C0
    • Sigrid
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      finnfun
      I enjoyed drawing from the photo. What came easily was my understanding of the posture of the bird and the relationship of the eye to the beak. I am having difficulty getting the layers of wing and tail feathers as well as how to draw the legs and feet properly. If I took more time I wold have worked on the branch and the lichen of the branch, as well as, the leaves to show where the bird was perched.
    • Isabella
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IB0715
      yellow warbler-20200726 Hello all, the warbler was a very nice starter project. I enjoyed studying the colorful feathers and their different yellow tones.  This drawing was done by color pencil on watercolor paper. In future I want to use watercolor as my previous colors. I love all the different warblers here in this community. It is always great to be surounded by other nature-addicted artists. Looking forward to more!
    • Erica
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      eszey0569
      1. I had fun with it - I tried to do it relatively quickly and not to get overly caught up in the details. I find wings to be difficult - appropriately preserving white space. The eye and bill came pretty easily. 2. I was surprised with the shading on the head - unsure if this is just the color of the photo or feathers. Also it made me notice some of the color patterns in the wings which I would not have noticed otherwise.YEWA Crop
    • Erica
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      eszey0569
      Accidental reply :)
    • Dana
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      D Mulder
      I really enjoyed sketching from a still photo! I started with the branch and lichen because I have practiced drawing those subjects before and then worked on the bird from the feet up.  I was a little intimidated by the bird.  I struggled with the beak of all things!  I'm also working on learning to capture light and shadow.  But, in the end, taking the time to slowly sketch from the photo I found little patterns in the wings which I chose to shade in darker to draw the eye to that particular part of the drawing.  That wound up being my favourite part of the sketch.Screen Shot 2020-08-07 at 7.06.32 PMclose up on tin
    • Melissa
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      enidenvy
      i love scrolling through and seeing everyone's warbler! bird
    • dgolson
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      dgolson
      Putting that first mark on the paper was challenging. I started with a couple basic egg shapes for the body and head then worked from there. The hardest part was the eye and the beak and making it look like a real bird. I would not have appreciated the shadowing and nuances of color if I were not asked to draw it. dgolson warbler exercise 080120
    • Bridget
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      rimuridge
      1. I felt pretty nervous about drawing from a photo! The hardest part was starting. Once I had started I found getting the proportions challenging. It was also tricky to work out how I would draw the feathers - so much detail. It was easier once I agreed with myself that mistakes were okay and I wasn't trying to recreate the photo in all it's detailed glory.Yellow warber first attempt 2. I hadn't appreciated the diversity in feathering until I focussed on the photo to draw it. I hope with journalling  and this course I will learn to focus and see/appreciate things in a new way.
    • Jeff S.
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      jschaffe
      Drawing from a photo means that I had more time to notice details that I might not have noticed on a moving subject.  Getting the proper proportions correct was a bit challenging.  Also, using a pencil, shading to indicate both color and shadows was difficult.Yellow Warbler
    • LindaShinohhara
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      shelbyp
      Drawing animals isn't something I do often so I felt a tad bit apprehensive.  Jumping in and getting started was easier than trying to copy something from an image.  I would not have noticed the details of the branches and which way they were growing and that some were broken off.  Noticing the bird details was not as critical since I'm a birder.  Yes, noticing branches and things that aren't specifically the topic of interest makes the images look more interesting.  IMG_6107
    • Ellen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      EllenHarrington
      I found it somewhat easy to copy this, my first attempt, though it was very small and I felt quite stiff.  I say relatively easy since with a photo your subject is static which gives you time to start, stop, erase, start over.  I was pleased with my first attempt and I am encouraged to plow ahead. In the photo, I think the shading is more noticeable than through observation, and the lichen might have been missed.  However, i don;t think those details this would would be my main focus but overall observations. IMG-1450
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      janetmacneil
      I feel like it was much easier to draw from the photo than trying to draw a bird in nature (which may fly away any moment). There was more time to look at it closely and make more detailed observations (in addition to looking at it really closely). I'm excited to learn how to draw more accurately (and be able to add more details) and how to use watercolors in the field!Yellow Warbler 7-25-20
    • Victoria
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      mvrestre
      It was a challenge to work in the Yellow Warbler because it usually takes me a lot of time to paint a bird. This time I tried to work fast, and to make a detailed sketch, I haven't received my journal yet, but I am very excited to work in my classes.Reinita-amarilla
      • Barbara
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        bbcastleman1
        Beautiful detail Victoria!
    • Kirsten
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Dunkelmotte
      Yellow_Warbler
      • Kirsten
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Dunkelmotte
        The anatomy of the feathers was hard for me to draw. I also have a problem with beaks. They are ether too small or too big. Drawing birds from photo is a good exercise for me to draw birds from nature later.
    • Kirsten
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Dunkelmotte
      Yellow_Warbler
    • Manuel
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      molles
      1. I enjoyed drawing from the photo, since I could focus on details without having to rely on my memory or worrying about the bird flying off. The easiest was approximating the general shape of the warbler. The more challenging aspects were reproducing the relative orientations of the different parts of the anatomy: head angle, leg placement, layering of wing feathers, and eye size direction of gaze. My color and color distribution was off as well.   2. There were so many details I would have missed, if I had not attempted to draw the warbler, not that I was able to reproduce them in my drawing. I do think that including sketches in my nature journals would improve them a lot.
    • Jenny
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      JennySheetz
      I like drawing from a photo because it gives me time to study the object I want to draw and notice details that would not be apparent in the brief time you get to study a moving object like a bird. It was easy to get the overall scene but getting proper proportions was challenging. Drawing the yellow warbler made me realize that even the legs and feet of the bird are yellow. I would have missed that just looking at a photo. WheIMG_4173n nature journaling I want to train my eye to notice what is actually there, instead of what I assume might be there.
    • May
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      May-A-A
      Yellow warbler was fun to draw. Looking at the photo gave me time to know the bird and take my time looking into its shape, color and some details. It was easy to depict the main shapes of the bird. The challenging part was showing balance. Drawing from photo made me notice the bird nostrils on beak which I didn't identify from the photo at first glance. Also, the wings, tail relationship.  This drawing helps to master some simple techniques that will make drawing the real bird on site a bit easier. Hopefully !   I did start working in my journal. Below are the pages about the Yellow warbler :) Lesson-1 IMG_2369IMG_2370
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Home2020
      Drawing from the photo allowed me to look and reexamine the bird over and over again.  Each time I looked at it I noticed something new...like the feather details and tiny talons.  Drawing the shape came easier than the details.  My drawing seems flat and more of a caricature than a real bird.  I think nature journaling will require faster reflexes on my part and perhaps making note of details the first time rather than taking my time as I did with the photo.
    • ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      annl37
      This was very hard but I loved the exercise.  I would not have noticed much of the detail and shading had I not tried to draw it.  The shading was especially difficult. I look forward to stretching my skills more!fullsizeoutput_f3f
    • Christy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      tucknzoe
      Color shading was the hardest. I wouldn't have noticed it's little feet/claws and how close it's eye is to its beak. I also don't think i realized that birds eyes don't have pupils?
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      SusanI
      I feel like my drawing looked a bit generic.  I noticed the many yellow colors in the bird when I drew it as well as noticing the body shape more.
    • Crystal
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Crystal T
      This was my first time using the portable water brushes and I feel like I went a little too wet at times. I found that getting the details like the stripes on the belly and shading of the wings was hard with watercolor, but I'm glad I tried it. I certainly wouldn't have noticed how the claws grab around the branch but loosely in some parts and the shape of the beak. I tried so many times to make the beak look just right!
    • Devon
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      dhoutz
      IMG_6609 I really enjoyed the entire process because it made me pay close attention to the moss, the shape of the head, the beak. The feet and expression of the bird came easily, whereas the sticks, feathers, and leaves were more challenging--probably because they required some very minute details, and I was more interested in the birds head and feet. All of this would be so useful with field journaling because it is what I pay attention to when it comes to nature--the utility of the claws around the branch, the form of the beak for pecking, etc.
    • Raymond
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      4730cc
      scan0158
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Jennyfee1970
      20200627_131934drawing this bird from a photo was interesting because of the Possebility to look closely at each little detail. Drawing the legs was most challenging because you have to find out where exactly they are bound to the body. And it makes me curious to birds anatomy.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      ChristineMargaret
      20200625_113918
    • Kadi
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Kadibirdie
      Bird Academy_Yellow Warbler1 Drawing this bird brought up a memory: Last year, I rented an old gas station in rural Utah to use as an art studio. I bought a small kiln for firing ceramic sculptures and set it up on the concrete floor of the main room, where they once sold candy bars and heat-radiated hot dogs. Since kiln firing took between 12-14 hours, I had a habit of loading it up at night and then camping behind the building in the back of my truck. One of those mornings, waking up at dawn to the sound of the neighbors letting out their horses, I went inside to check on the status of the kiln. It had completed the firing cycle, but still needed time to cool down prior to unloading. I decided to take the opportunity to stroll down to the trucker cafe for some watery coffee and a breakfast burrito. On my way back, I came upon an unmoving yellow bird laying on the sidewalk. It was still alive, so I cradled it to my chest and brought it back to the gas station, where I called my birder sister for advice. We identified the bird as a yellow warbler. She told me that it was possibly in shock, and the best thing to do would be to keep it warm and hope for a revival. Luckily, the lid of the kiln was the perfect temperature for bringing birds back to life, or so I hoped. I made a small bed out of plastic tupperware and an old shirt, and snuggled my unresponsive patient into the recovery room atop the kiln. I spent the next hour in a state of worry, periodically peeking in at this sweet and brilliantly-colored new friend. In time, the bird righted itself into a sitting position and began to blink. When it seemed ready, I brought it outside for release. It seemed as though the bird sat perched on my finger for a long time before suddenly taking flight to an elm tree. Sweet sweet sweet she's so sweet, I thought. May she be singing today. Bird Academy_Yellow Warbler
      • Deepa
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        DeepaIyer
        Loved the anecdote. Thank you
      • suzie
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        suziebirder
        Thank you for the wonderful story.
      • Theresa
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        Theresa57

        @suzie What a great story. Thanks for sharing.

    • Isabel
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      isabelanna4
      IMG_20200621_160452 disfrute dibujar utilizando esta foto- pero se que sin movimiento es mas facil. Nunce he podido dubjuar ni pintar los aves en vivo porque muevan tanto- hasta lo deje intentar. Fue facil capturar la forma del cuerpo, pero los detalles mas finos como de la rama, o como dejar espacio blanco tambien fue mas dificil.
    • Sherry
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      sherrycosseboom
      IMG_0203
    • Emmanuel
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      erosarionegron
      20200615_142021 I used to draw as a child and now that I am in quarantine I tried to pick back up the habit. At first I was scared because of the time that I haven't draw and that I never draw "real" stuff, just animated.  For me the most challenging part was drawing the details and getting the proportions right but drawing the bird as a whole was fun. If I wasn't asked to draw it I would have never noticed the wing proportions; this might help for nature journaling just to get the details right for differentiating species.
    • Patty
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Polartrekker
      I enjoyed drawing this bird and am looking forward to learning techniques that will allow me to do so with more attention to detail, shading, and composition. I thought the beak was difficult to draw well and am hopeful to improve that over time. I think my drawing lacks the "expression" of the bird in the picture. I guess I think this drawing is kind of flat, but I had fun doing it, so it's all good. I don't think I would have noticed all the details of the feathers if I wasn't asked to draw this bird. In my past drawings I sort of scribble wings, but this time I counted them before I drew them (of course, the number drawn may still not be reality!). This was a fun exercise, and I'm looking forward to learning more and getting better. assignment1
    • Jean Oliver
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Jean Oliver
      Lesson One's photo drwg: I wasn't satisfied with this, the eye and beak are wrong, etc. So what I realized was I was already too critical with the process, and must try to be patient. The basic layout came quickly, the composition was already figured out by the photographer. I found the sketchbook page too small so I think I'll get the larger book recommended. I want to develop a quicker, tidier journal handwriting style. I noticed the positioning of the bird better, where it was on the branch, where the leaves were by drawing it. Practicing this should make things go faster for moving targets. Lesson One Warbler
    • Vicki
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      vsmithky
      IMG_0362 Getting started with drawing from a picture is a great way to get started.  Understanding how to draw the different textures was very difficult.  Nature journaling will allow me to observer greater detail that I have not noticed previously.
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      JFeldkamp
      1. Yellow warblers don't pose, so it was good to have one hold still in the photo. It was all pretty challenging. I decided to try the pens that I got for the course. I think pen is less forgiving than pencil because you can't erase or shade. I tried to draw the whole scene and getting the texture of the bark was quite difficult/impossible. Plus, my bird looks 'flat,' not round. 2. I would not have noticed the shading around the head and back of the bird without drawing. Nor would I have noticed the 'stripey' look to the wings. So a nature journal would make you stop and look more closely. Yellow warbler 1
    • Kelly
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      kellywise
      IMG_2951 The beak was challenging for me. I think I really notice the proportions when I have to draw something. I think that is the advantage of drawing for a nature journal, you are forced to look at all of the details
    • Shane
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      shaneLe
      20200610_130716
    • Twisha
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Twisha Sangwan
      IMG_20200609_121112
    • Roseann
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      roseann.millward
      Since this is my first serious try at drawing anything I think I did ok. I found drawing from a photo not as difficult as I thought and  that I paid more attention to the detail of the bird than if I was taking a photo. yellow warbler
      • Jill
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        JFeldkamp
        Yes, I think you did just fine!
    • Aisha
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Ai.Albadi
      I find drawing from a photo reference gets me in a very meditative state. However, when it comes to drawing from life, it gets you in this fast mode action & fun you get to use all your senses it really develops the muscle memory & makes you faster. I never tried drawing a moving bird I find it quiet difficult cause they are very active, birds would fly in a second, which makes it hard to capture. On the other hand I'm familiar with figure drawing, you get the chance to capture a human movement, cause humans tend to take their time waiting for their coffee or texting on their phones it would be easier to capture the gesture than a flying bird or other creatures. When it comes to color it is more accurate from life for sure, than a photograph, but the lights & shadows will keep on changing, which I think why photos would be easier if you want to make an accurate painting with shadows & lights. Drawing from life would be great for developing your gesture drawing skills, building your observation muscles & remembrance maybe. I think painting or drawing for nature journaling would be easier on still objects but the challenge would be the accuracy of the lights & shadows & the feeling, which will change depending on the time of the day, weather, how fast the object moves & how long you take on the painting. when it comes to anatomy you can always go back & study from a reference photo and redraw what you've already drawn on your nature journal.   20200607_115212
      • diana
        Participant
        Chirps: 49
        ittybittyart
        I love this little painted card.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      patofvta
      I thought using a photo was much easier to see the detail and capture something because the subject is frozen.  It was a challenge because I do not know bird anatomy very well, had to sketch what I saw without knowing the parts.  The photo has so much detail that it seems nearly impossible to capture the likeness of a bird without suffering lots of ugly's in real life.  I may spend some time practicing sketching other pictures I have taken of birds to get more familiar with the parts.  Hard to describe where the color is without the vocabulary.   Seems like using photos and sketching in the field will benefit creating the Nature Journal. Pat20200606_162043
    • Claudia
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Claudiahosso
      IMG_4180I was able to take my time so I guess it felt easier than nature journalism. The texture was less challenging than what I thought but the form was challenging. I would´t have noticed the different levels of the wings or the subtle orange stripes in the body. Yes, I think it must be quite different  To catch details and poses in live movement,
    • Cayenne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      C. DaBell
      741DC697-AADE-459F-846D-4EB03CE133E7 It is much easier to draw from a photo. It gives me time to notice lots of details and work to make my drawing more accurate. The more details I add to my drawing, the more I learn about the subject and the better I remember the experience.
    • Rebecca
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      beckgard
      20200603_22183920200603_221922 While drawing I realized that I do not know bird anatomy very well so I was drawing what I saw without understanding what it was or how it works, this can be a + or - to the overall picture.  Drawing from a photo is easy tho I am very rusty.  I did use my eraser a few times.  I liked the talons wrapping around the branch and want to draw these again in close-up.  Pixel, my rat terrier, is glad that I'm done drawing so my lap is available.
    • Sally
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      sally19
      I find that drawing from photos gives you time to correct proportions and enables you to see more details. I have found that coloring is not always correct with photos compared to life. When the natural  light hits whatever it is that you are drawing it gives different and more subtle changes than you get in many photos. I think in life you can draw more 3d looking pictures  with capturing more natural movements. It is definately more challenging to draw from life in the elements and with light ever changing than it is to sit in front of a photo and draw and correct and take your time. IMG_20200603_134429
    • kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      kattykort
      I prefer drawing from a photo, it gives me time to study the subject. For me the most challenging part of drawing is getting the sizing right and keeping it similar on the page. When sketching in the field I tend to pick objects that don't move to much or can't fly away, like a grass, flower, tree or a scene. I am hoping this class will help me to overcome the reluctance I have to sketch living things in the field.  Journal Class YEWA
    • Heidi
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Meierdvm
      Drawing from an image was fine. Drawing while they are flying is very difficult. What came easily was obtaining the shape and size of the warbler. It was adding the details that was more tricky because I tend to go overboard. I should have drawn the complete branch and leaves. Perhaps I would add details at home instead of in the field.
    • Heidi
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Meierdvm
      44286802-8C03-4298-872F-5C8E6D05060A
    • Kate
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Naturedoodles
      WIN_20200602_13_06_43_Pro Here is my Warbler drawing. Sorry that it's not very clear, my computer camera isn't very good.
    • اليازية
      Participant
      Chirps: 27
      Alyazia
      793257DD-37FF-4A04-B77A-7362D291ADFD Drawing from a photograph is fine - it allows me to take my time drawing, however, it feels like “flat”; a 2D image is being copied. It is good if i cant stay outside for long due to the weather conditions. The joy of observing is not there though. I noticed the texture of the Podotheca as well as the form of the beak. Noticing the details is very important in nature journaling; it us part of sensing the bird being watched. It is of importance to point that observing bird’s behaviours for a while is enriching our visual memory. So that when we sketch it from a photograph -even if the photo is a bit blurred due to its fast movement- we will still be able to draw it accurately. After uploading the image, i noticed that I forgot to add the name & information of the bird ^_^;
    • DeLaine
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      jettredhead
      • 6EF103EC-3F1D-4FD6-9B5A-54E7435CACA4
    • Laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Laurie HGibb
      Drawing the Yellow Warbler helped me generalize what I Thought a yellow warbler looked like.  I paid more attention to the shape of the body and to the details of the red stripes.  Also, I saw how the values such as dark and darker helped define the wings, the beak and the eye.  I'm aware how much easier it is to paint something that doesn't keep flitting around!  I'm not sure a yellow warbler would hold still for me if I saw it in a bush!
    • Miguel
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      MiguelPG
      I like drawing from the photo. I'm slow, and given that the image is a photo, the image moves much slower than I ... Getting the proportions right is a challenge for me. I really made attention to how the skeletal and the muscular structure is present in the photo. For example, I tried to imagine how the beak was not an appendage, but was an extension of the bird's skull. As well, I wanted to capture how the upper part of the covert of the wing had some contour. This exercise sharpened by observation skills. - I'm excited to see how I hopefully improve over the course.612F24E7-A353-497B-A6A0-E4BFF3F8B0A4
    • Laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Laurie HGibb
      I've always loved just sitting and observing nature.  I've done a bit of journalling on some journeys I've taken in my VW camper.  I'm not feeling very confident about it, but still when I look at the sketches or watercolors it brings back such wonderful feelings.  I want to learn more about how to do this and have it become so natural that I don't hesitate to do it often.  I love writing down what I see, but I don't necessarily do it in a very organized way.  A nature journal at this time seems perfect for me.  I loved seeding the examples of what other people did.  I'd like to practice quick sketches of birds that show impression, behavior, posture, etc.  I'm hoping by drawing birds and adding details it will help me recognize them when I see them in the field.  I'm so excited to be doing this now!  It keeps me from feeling stuck in my townhome! Laurie
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      NancyChew
      1. Just  by chance over the last few days, before I joined the course, I had tried to draw a couple warblers from photos so I was thinking, okay, I've done this a couple times already; I can do this. However, I tried to draw without too much erasing because I felt in the field you may have to draw faster before the bird flies away. This made it challenging to get the proportions right. I wanted to include the branch because I feel that adds interest to the drawing but when I looked at my finished drawing I realized the bird was proportionally much larger than the branch. And the proportions of the bird are a little off. IMG_1062[11213]Since I have been paying attention to the warblers and the parts of songbirds recently I feel it came a little easier to figure out the details of the feathers. 2. There are several things I might not have noticed from the photo if I didn't draw it:
      • the black color in the wings;
      • the gray shading on the head and back,
      • the different colors in the bill; and
      • the different colors and moss (?) on the branch
      • اليازية
        Participant
        Chirps: 27
        Alyazia
        Hello Nancy, This might be off topic but your minimalistic  way of sketching reminds me of the Finnish artist and illustrator Emmi Jormalainen . In fact, your drawing made me consider going back to the ink sketching instead of colouring the birds. Sometimes, black and white sketching forces us to think deeply into the details. Best, Alyazia
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      sarahklo
      1. Wow, that went better than I thought! I remember looking at it and thinking "wow, I can't capture these fine details" and then I ended up drawing the bird, without more of the foliage than the branch it is clinging to, and getting more of the bird's details than I expected! 2. The overall shape went better than I expected, but the gaze and facial expression absolutely eludes me. The result is kind of charming, but it's not the look the warbler is giving to the camera, at all. Also, without the color, it's really hard to convey with strokes the complexities of shading of this bird's feathers. I haven't ever seen one of these warblers in real life, but I found myself using the anatomy I've learned from bird books and from a long ago ornithology class, to capture what I did of the different feather groups and their coloration. Then again, I just realized that by choosing to focus on the bird I really haven't captured a bit of which plant this bird is perching on, and in my mind's eye I don't have a solid guess as to what sort of tree or shrub it is.  When I scroll back up, there's lichen, and I can begin to make a guess, but I just hadn't focused on it at all while drawing. And if I look down, I see other people _did_ try to play with color, and now I can't wait until my watercolors arrive. This was a lot of fun to do. IMG_20200528_150714183
    • Caroline
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      cwparks
      20200525_145404 Not bad for my first attempt at drawing in several years. Even after several rounds with the eraser I still didn't get the shape quite right, but it's definitely recognizable as a bird, and maybe even as a yellow warbler. Drawing from the photo gave me an opportunity to see all the features and identify which bits were shadow and which were actual markings, and I don't think my observations would have been nearly as detailed if I weren't drawing. Obviously birds in the wild generally aren't going to sit still for this kind of observation, but I think practicing this kind of drawing from photos might train me to see those kinds of details more quickly when I'm looking at a moving target.
    • Duane
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Purepenguin
      I have to say I felt a little intimidated looking at the photo. But after sketching and using the water colors, I felt a lot more confident. I will be focusing on getting more detail out of the paint, I feel this is most challenging. I didn't spend a whole lot of time studying the photo, I seemed to have focused mostly on the Warbler. IMG_4089 Yellow Warbler
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        NancyChew
        I think you did a really good job with the overall shape of the bird and the colours. I love the way you captured the dark black of the eye (with the little white dot of reflection) and the black in the wings and the tail. The notes regarding the color or other characteristics is a good idea, especially in the field, when the bird may fly away before you get to finish the painting.
      • Duane
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        Purepenguin

        @Nancy Thank you Nancy, This was the first time I used watercolor paints. I always thought of myself as Not a painter, I always used pencils, felts in the past when making pictures.

    • Géry
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Whimbrel1961
      1. The drawing itself was not that difficult for me. I draw birds since my early childhood... But the most difficult thing is to put watercolor on my drawing. My medium is acrylic or more than watercolor. I try to use a yellow wash above olive-green back of the bird (on the greater, medium, and lesser covers). The eye is not exactly round because the head is a little bit turned. I always try to paint some little point around the (= eyering) around the eye! I directly saw from where the light is coming on the photo and put shade under the right-wing and not far from the tail. Drawing from a photo is easy because I can always look precisely at it and see what is correct or wrong. I only concentrate on trying to represent the bird the best I can. I know how to paint a branch and increase it's roundness take into account the shade and light! 2. If I had to paint that bird for nature journaling, I think I might to try to draw the bird faster and put only a little bit of color (with water colored pencils more than watercolor). I probaly will add some details of the lichen and leaves...
    • Géry
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Whimbrel1961
      GvdK_Yellow Warbler
      • Géry
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        Whimbrel1961
        GvdK_Bobcat
      • اليازية
        Participant
        Chirps: 27
        Alyazia
        Hi Géry, what are the type of  colours used in your drawing? btw, i liked the  lynx as well :)
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      lmosiecki1
      1. Some of the proportions were difficult among the various objects. 2. When drawing, I noticed more detail in the branch and what was on it besides the warbler.
    • Paula
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      EatingOnTwoWheels
      I was asked to write an article for an employer's social media post, and I decided to focus on sketching (though I don't mention the sketching part until the end.) Some novice sketchers might appreciate my struggle! https://operaflute.blogspot.com/2020/05/a-stay-at-home-order-sketches-on-dining.html
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      lsmsc2012
      I was afraid to tackle the watercolors, but that probably would have been a better option than the pencils. 066788CB-3A67-408B-B908-C342097AFFE7
    • Terry
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      livingsystems
      It was more difficult than I thought it would be to capture the posture of the little bird and I was a bit confused as to what details to add. I am really enjoying working with the watercolor pen but it will take a while to master. Right now I'm overworking the color and want to try experimenting with some other techniques.yellow warbler
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Wildvoices
      I enjoyed the fact that the Yellow Warbler wasn't moving! I needed to look at the details over-and-over and revise-revise-revise the sketch when something didn't look right (e.g., eye placement). I was fortunate to have several living (YEWAs) encouraging me along outside my cabin as I worked. I hear them all the time but getting a look is a challenge. I wonder if I will every be able to draw from a glimpse... Feather placement on the wings would have been extremely difficult without the photo. I could have spent hours trying to get them right but this was a supposed to be sketch. Compared to photography, I really liked to be able to annotate my drawing. John2020-05-22 16.54.33
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      L1saBsta
      It's surprising how much fear arose every step of the way on this drawing, the first mark, erasure, adding color, adding ink. I think that's why I've put off starting the course. I keep saying I'm to busy, but that's probably just masking the fear. (The supremely organized sock drawer isn't terribly fulfilling.) And I learned so much just by staying with this image for a few days, the parts of the wing, the loose grip of one claw. The yellow warbler is olive and amber and black!
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      L1saBsta
      20200521_094728
    • Amber
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      AHanna12
      yellow warbler
    • Deborah
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      dtfoise
      This is the 2nd time I am taking this class - thought it was a great idea to try everything again.  It is alot easier to draw from a photo, much easier to take the time to see the shape and colors of the bird.  I do like drawing from nature, though.  It is nice to be outside and there is something organic about drawing on the fly.  My yellow warbler drawing did not turn out as nice as the 2d time I drew it from taking the course the first time.  Oh well, some days I am better than others at drawing.Yellow warbler round 2
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      shardill
      IMG_2647 This was a fun exercise.....and I took my time to try to capture proportion and some detail.  It will be fun to compare at the end of the course.  The photo was beautiful to work from, plus you have the luxury of time.  Drawing live in nature will definitely be more of a challenge (:
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      kbarlow
      It is difficult to decide when to stop!  Should I keep adding details or call it quits?  It begins to look overworked, the longer I keep painting.  I think/hope painting directly from nature will allow me to capture more of the personality, or movement will make it more interesting.  Comparing my work to the photograph is defeating.  This first attempt did not achieve results I had hoped for.  My warbler does not look alive.image
      • Cynthia
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Mea Lea
        Oh, Karen, please don't feel defeated!  You have so much going on in your drawing and painting.The colors, the proportions, the crooks and curves of the leaves and branches, and curves in his feet make it all look alive!  And , remember, this is what you are to compare your last drawing of him to at the end of the course!  Enjoy!!!
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7
        Hi Karen. Yes, like Cynthia said, please do not get discouraged or defeated. Know when to stop is hard, but I am pleased with the results of your drawing and how your use, especially the shading and blending, of the watercolors was done. They give depth and contrast to the bird’s features.
    • Genevieve
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Meowwings
      20200517_104733 This turned out much better that I expected! The hardest part was getting started, but once I did it was sketch-erase-sketch-erase-sketch and I enjoyed it. Knowing when to stop is also hard, but since I was working on it while my baby slept, he helped me break away when he woke up. ;) Working from such a high quality photo was good for studying proportions and detail. I will probably download some more pictures like this from the Mckauly library so practice on days when we can get outside!
    • Sue
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      creekgal53
      nature journaling drawing #1I was surprised and pleased at the end, though I think I went through more eraser than pencil during the process. There's lots more observation when you draw. I think of photographs as a memento -- something captured rather than reproduced.
      • Genevieve
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Meowwings
        Great job on the feet!
    • Hilary
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      freesia
      I felt anxious about starting to draw until I listened to the lesson again and understood that this was like a baseline and that everything after it would stand a chance of being better! The overall proportions and the bill were most challenging. yw3yw2
    • Adella
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      adellamarie
      2020-05-12 - First DrawingWhen I began to draw the warbler, I realized how difficult it was.  I thought it would be easy. I didn’t know where to start.  Should I start drawing the bird first or branches first?  As I began to draw, I started to notice the brownish fine lines on the breast,  black on the edge of wings and the posture.  As I nature journal, I believe details will make a difference.
    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      kathymcdonald
      The shape of the bird was hard. I wasn't sure what to draw first, the bird or the branches. And if the bird, what part of the bird? For me, I really started to notice details on the wing. The folded primaries and secondaries I may not have noticed unless I was asked to draw it. Unfortunately, birding in the field is hard because the birds are fast and rarely sit still. With drawing I think we can pay more attention, check other sources, and study the birds rather than just see enough field marks or hear the song YellowWarbler_Ex1to get an ID.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      maryer
      I loved the challenge of looking carefully, of trying to capture the “essence” of a Yellow Warbler and what makes it different from other birds. I had trouble with the beak - I think I have one bird shape for every bird I have ever drawn! This time I tried to think about what warblers eat so erase the seed beak. Drawing made me think about the many parts, feathers, legs, feet, beak, streaks on breast, etc. and how they go together to make a warbler.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      maryer
      imageI
    • radha
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      radhamoorthy
      Okay...the drawing of the bird made me pay very close attention to very detail of the bird and the branch and leaves.  I was really paying attention to detail.  It was really fun!
      • radha
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        radhamoorthy
        IMG_4845
    • Priscilla
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Priscilla Taylor-Williams
      Getting shape, color and correct length and size ratios was difficult. What worked was that as I drew I noticed more and more about the anatomy of the bird. The longer I drew the more questions about what I was seeing emerged. This process really allowed me to "see" better and required more engagement in observing and thinking (clearly better for a nature journal).20200509_162005 (1)
    • Colleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 43
      CBMac7
      5B0A9478-033F-4B39-823E-1107E6A41707 1. I feel much more comfortable drawing from a photo because my subject won’t move & I don’t feel like I have to rush. The drawing layout (composition) is set, I have a reference to look back at, which comes easy. My challenging part is size-perspective & drawing the fine details of feathers and textures, to give a 3-D look instead of the flat 2-D drawing. 2. Maybe the moss & lichen on the branches.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Gags will
      1B0C07B4-8A84-4E05-8F64-B31890A233C5It took a lot of erasing and about 1 1/2 hrs, but I enjoyed the process.  I’m just now posting this!  Some of you folks are already amazing!
    • Sara
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      sesdla
      Yesterday while I was birding, I saw and heard a yellow warbler way up in a tree.  Although I had a good look at the warbler up in the tree, seeing a photo of it and then drawing it while paying attention to the shape of the bird, as well as the coloring detail, will help me to remember those characteristics of the bird, making for easier bird identification in the future.
    • Deb
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      @debot
      The photo had more detail but doing my drawing made me focus more on the parts of the bird. I learned more about the anatomy of a bird leg and how the claws worked. I also saw way more color when I needed to paint it.20200504_191811
    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Great Kills Park
      1st sketch yellow warbler- course Nature Journaling
    • Deb
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      @debot
      The photo had more detail but doing my drawing made me focus more on the parts of the bird. I learned more about the anatomy of a bird leg and how the claws worked. I also saw way more color when I needed to paint it.20200504_143814
    • Jessie
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      jperagine
      20200503_131542Drawings have an advantage over photos because the camera can only capture when the device's lens is told to get, which can be blurry or miss part of the whole picture, while when drawing you can take longer to capture as much detail as possible, go back and correct mistakes and improve upon it. Photos have an advantage over photos of being able to capture a moment for later reference and do so much quicker then drawing that moment, which you might miss some action with your head down at a sketchpad instead of up with your eye looking through a lens. 1- It was ok drawing from the photo. The general shape and appearance of the bird was fine, but trying to get feathers to look lifelike and faces and heads the right proportions are always difficult for me. 2- I don't think there was anything in the photo that I didn't notice if I wasn't going to draw it and at this time I don't know if that would make a difference when nature journaling.
    • Sally
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      mandosally
      Warbler That was fun! I look forward to seeing how it'll change as I work through the course. Basically, I was just drawing what I see for this.
    • Carree
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      TytoFurcata
      I found the general shapes to be easy to get down but when it came to filling in the details it got a bit muddled with only the pencil at this stage of my drawing skills. Hoping to get better with coloring in features when having something to color with isn't an option. I'm a big fan of black line art so hoping to incorporate that a lot into my journaling. I did notice some growth on the branch in the form of lichen/moss/mold, thanks to a book I just finished reading, that I might not have noticed otherwise. Here's my Yellow Warbler to kick off my journaling experience beyond just taking notes on the bird species I see.Yellow-Warbler
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      HippoCampus
      IMG_0430Love the fact that the bird stays still - you can take your time and try to capture how it really looks. It was fairly easy to get the basic body shape, but capturing the angles of the legs was hard. It's also difficult to "suggest" the feathers without drawing too much detail and muddying the picture. I noticed the complexity of the little guy's feet and how they grasped the branch. Not sure I'd notice the feet when out in the wild, but overall drawing draws you into what you're seeing so much more than just looking or trying to photograph. (pun not intended.... ;)
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      mpkwnt
      Drawing from the photo was way more convenient than doing it out in the field would be (I've never tried that so this is only a guess).  Photos let you see details you'd miss otherwise and offer clues in how to identify the birds so drawing may improve my birding.  Win, win - or that's the hope.  I could easily tell the photo was a picture of a yellow warbler, but I can't say the same for my drawing.  :-/IMG_6573
    • Tirzah
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Diamondsnakeyay
      I liked drawing from the photo. I could take as long as I liked. The head was the easiest part for me, but I had some trouble getting the tail and the feathers that flood out to look right. If I hadn't had to draw the bird, I probably wouldn't have noticed all of the intricate lines, and how much black there is in the picture. Overall, I enjoyed it.IMG_0987
    • Kitty
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Kittystrickland
      B55E3ED2-7AC7-4825-B0B0-ECDF4CDE0022
    • Ellen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      odonnee6
      I am not very familiar with water colors and I feel like I have a lot to learn about how to use them. I didn't like the colors that much that I used but I don't know how to mix them. You definitely note a lot more detail when you draw from a photo. When you are drawing from nature you miss a lot of detail unless the object you are drawing stays still for a long time which is unusual.yellowwarbler1
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Jennifer63
      First drawing of a bird.   A little rough, found the proportions hard to recreate.   However not a stick person (:1650E7C3-2AA2-43E3-A35C-2C7D93B0A1F7
    • Darren
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      TheMrL
      Zombie WarblerI found it started looking like a zombie or otherwise frightening bird pretty quickly. It's the eyes. I also got lazy about the plumage and wings, and it probably would have been better to just suggest more. My son, who is six, said "head is same, wings kinda same... body is not same."
      • Azurekat
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        Azurekat
        I love this! The symbolism is wonderful! The hungry little zombie lying in wait for the feeder to be filled! Haha! Good job actually. It's a lot of detail. With practice, you will be able to pull it all together!
    • Olivia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      ovandamme
      I felt apprehensive at first but accepted the challenge of drawing the bird. Getting it to look three dimensional or pop out of the page was difficult. Mine looks flat and you can't tell the curvature of the bird. I also found it difficult to draw the branches to look like they were proportional and adding depth to them was hard too. What I noticed were the beautiful diversity of life on the branch! The lichen and the bluish colors, orange on the branches and different textures all along the branch. I also noticed the black lines on the feathers more detailed as well.
    • Morgan
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      MorganClark
      birdcourse1 My initial drawing was good, and then I put it down for a day or two, and came back to it later to color it in. I had initially meant to do it with watercolors, but I don't have good paper for that at the moment, so I used a regular sketch book and then I decided to color it with colored pencils. So then, rather than simply coloring in my drawing of the bird, I had to locate all of my colored pencils and make sure all the sets were complete and arrange them correctly by color and number and then sharpen all the ones that weren't sharp... Five hours later... I clearly have a procrastination issue. During that process I decided to use watercolor pencils for a compromise. I think it came out ok, but I will use better paper next time. I take too long to do a drawing to be able to draw something like a bird before it flies away...I think I may consider taking photos of things like birds and other things that might run off while I'm outside wandering around and making drawings of them later, and draw things like plants and rocks that stay put in person.
    • Venelina
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Camome
      I wanted to capture the character. Most difficult - to capture the bird's proportions.птица
    • Alison
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      AlisonDundy
      For some reason my note didn't accompany my lousy picture. The exercise helped me get past the tyranny of the blank page. Sketching teaches me how to see and commit details to memory. I have zero experience (well, not since kindergarten). Sometimes I kept my eye on the Yellow Warbler while moving my pencil, as if the hand was powered by the eye. Other times I shifted my gaze up to the photo and down to the journal. Is there a right or wrong way?
    • Lyubomira
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Mellindor
      IMG_20200429_224452 I had a lot of fun drawing this picture! I hadn't done watercolors for a long time and I never thought I was very good in it to begin with. But all the videos from the previous step of the course gave me motivation to try anyway. Drawing the tree branch was surprizingly easy, I had a lot of fun trying to capture the texture. The bird was harder, I still don't have a full grasp of bird anathomy :) If I wasn't asked to draw the picture, I don't think I would have noticed all the colors of the tree branch. I was surprised that I defaulted to "trees are brown" and didn't even think about it. Noticing the real colors behind things will be really useful from now on!
    • Nolan
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      nolrich829
      Getting the shape down at first was challenging, but filling in the details came easier.I noticed way more about the bird now that I had to draw it. I've identified this bird multiple times in real life, but I don't think I could have fully described the bird's appearance until now, after I have drawn it. I hope this is one of the many benefits of nature journaling.
    • Azurekat
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Azurekat
      unnamed Photos are much faster. Drawings let you see way more detail. I don't think I would have noticed the dark edges on the wing feathers if I didn't draw it. I was looking for details to put in the drawing. Also, once I started, the drawing drew me in. I found getting the proportions within the picture somewhat challenging.
    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      acemagpie
      20E3D351-54E4-4949-90FA-8EF2D5D79D24
      • Theresa
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        Theresa57
        Hi Anna, I just wanted to say I’m in MI too. Looking forward to lots of fun with this course. Theresa
    • Glenn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      gtippy
      • 2669C2AD-ADF2-4361-9B69-FEC025845AC137462492-12AF-4AA8-94C0-2A148CC090EE
      • Glenn
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        gtippy
        After 65 years of birding, 30 years of FeederWatch, I immediately noticed that this process made me see details and even general appearance that I rarely noticed.  Being adept at GISS, color, habitat and movement, I didn't have to see fine details of the living appearance.  This is wonderful.
    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      jirwinromo
      2CB536B8-33CF-4DD4-915C-9A3AE22ADCC5_1_105_cIt's a challenge for me to take the time to observe, sketch, come back and observe again. By drawing, I took more time to see the picture, beyond the beautiful colors. Still waiting for my own watercolors/sketch pad to be delivered, so just pencil for now.
    • Alison
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      AlisonDundy
      • FFA8FC1C-0EB9-48AA-B269-016F3A2554AD
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      RaptorFalconFinch5
      1) I felt a little apprehensive about it at first, but I loosened up after a little bit.  Actually, it didn't turn out as bad as I thought.  What came easily was some of the basic shapes, especially the curve of the branch the warbler is sitting on.  What was more difficult was the thicker branch toward the bottom of the picture, as well as the bird's stance and trying to make it look accurate. 2) If I weren't asked to draw it, I wouldn't have noticed the bites and marks on of the leaves as well as the way the bird's legs are positioned on the branch.  I think this would make a difference when nature journaling since you would loose some valuable detail in your drawings.
    • francisco
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      staffanell
      It was easier to copy the image than attempt to draw from the living bird.  I tried drawing the birds coming to the feeder this morning and it was very challenging but the results can be made to work with time and practice.  I am 81 years old and would love still to learn to paint. I was going to register in another class but when I saw this offer I decided for my coming birthday to accept the challenge. Francisco.thumbnail
    • Michael Kaproth
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      mtk5
      I liked  being able to add additional information to images. "Alternate leaves", "Red streaks on yellow", etc.  Pencils work well for me and the idea of color and brushes is daunting, and exciting. IMG_0291[1300]
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird
        Hi Michael, I really like the way you labeled the key identifying features of the Yellow Warbler . . . “red streaks on yellow” for its underbelly, for example. It makes the drawing and learning process more interesting and more scientific. Now you’ve motivated me. Thank you!
    • Gena
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      genathompson
      I felt somewhat comfortable drawing from a photo because it is stationary and does not move. I was able to look at the lines and angles of branch, leaves and the yellow warbler. Drawing the branch was easier because of the lengths of the lines and being able to see where the leaves were attached to the branch in comparison to the whole branch. The most challenging was the birds feathers. The wing is so like the rest of the body. The chest of the bird was particularly difficult to get the right angle of slope down to the feet. I probably would not have noticed the moss and what looks to be some type of lichen on the branch had I not been trying to draw it. I would think the details would be very difficult to do in nature journaling because there are so many details in nature! Overall, I am I am excited to get started!
    • margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      MapaChip
      1.  What came easily was the overall image but what was challenging was the colors within the bird and getting those right.  Defining the wings were challenging too.  2. I noticed all kinds of things when drawing this warbler -- the wing bars, the faint mark behind the eye, the 2-tone black of the beak, the long legs.  I think the advantage of nature journaling is how it generates a sense of wonder and awe.
    • Theresa
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      tsmstrat
      I have not drawn in a while,  so I was a bit nervous, but once I started it felt good. The hard part for me are the feathers, especially the very fine, fluffy ones on the upper back. You definitely pay more attention to the details when you have to draw something - especially the color combinations in the feathers. I only drew this with pencil, though, so I could only hit the light and dark tones. But I like that drawing forces you to spend a lot of time on the details, this could really help you remember how to identify a species. NJ_first_bird
      • Azurekat
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        Azurekat
        You did a great job on the face! Sweet!
    • Kimberly
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      kcollingwood
      IMG-2856
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      LauraStovel
      I like drawing from a photo because it stays still, but at the same time it lacks the life of a drawing out in nature. Here I can pay attention to details. I liked sketching the beak and feet, something I may not have been able to observe carefully when drawing outside.  I wondered about their shape and functions. I found the lychens to be challenging, especially the large one, because it doesn't have the same definitive shape and shading. Sketch 1, yellow warbler
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Karen_Peterson
      Photo on 4-25-20 at 4.27 PM
    • Les
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Lesbrandt
      Drawing from a photo is easier than in nature because I have time to compare spaces and angles.  I have a lot of trouble with beaks because I haven't practiced enough. I always see things when drawing that I never saw before.  Nature journaling makes me much more aware of my surroundings, whether it be a bird or a bee, a person or a tree. 7C647277-E62F-400B-A2A6-D136D1D33B77_1_105_c
      • Shir
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        BirdShir
        What a sweet picture. Love your presentation.
    • Leonora
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      noniebird
      45C4CCD9-C716-4FD8-A2FA-02CFE59EC8E4
    • Amanda
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      agaskin
      With a still photo, it is easy to focus on the details and perhaps spend more time than one should on a quick sketch.  The biggest difficulty I had was in proportions.  I could not quite get the sizing right from bird to branch to background. I was not able to show well in my sketch that the warbler's head was turned to the viewer.  I do feel like my sketch shows some of the vivacity of the bird and I like that.  Drawing is another way of remembering so I hope that in doing so, it will cement some of the field marks for these species in my mind.  IMG_0733
    • Julie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      julieannhart
      I prefer drawing from a photo because you have time to study the details. You miss the movement and behaviors, but you can see the light and feather patterns better. It was difficult to represent the shiny bill and the multitude of colors with pencil, but at the same time forced me to pay attention to overall light and contrast of the whole composition. If I drew this again, I'd pay closer attention to the proportions of the breast, head, and eye. They have a flattish crown and a bold brow, which I didn't capture as well as I'd have liked. The eye is too far back from the bill giving him a bit of a woodcock look! Looking forward to learning more techniques and seeing the redo at the end of the course.   YellowWarbler
    • Alison
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      AlisonDundy
      I enjoyed trying to draw the yellow warbler from the photo and did not feel too embarrassed That my drawing was such a poor image. Everything was a challenge, especially proportions. I didn’t know if I should draw while looking at the image or if I should look at the page while I drew and keep looking back at the photo, alternating. I would not have noticed the details of the foliage or the shading on the wings. Details like these hone my sense of sight and memory for journaling.
    • Adelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Adelle
      IMG_4096
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      ruthdrawsgonzalez
      As a photo, I would notice the details only in broad strokes...yellow bird, green leaves, stick. Drawing it caused me to take note of many details about the bird, the shape of and the light on the leaves, shape of the branch, the lichen and the moss on the stick...even though not detailed in my drawing.
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      ruthdrawsgonzalez
      cornell yellow warbler 1
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird
        Yours is my favorite drawing of the Yellow Warbler. I like the way you were able to create dimension on the bird by showing us the tip of its left wing. And on the branches and leaves with shading and leaf positioning. I’ll keep following your drawings, because I know good things are coming!
    • cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      c.e.anderson
      Oh boy. For me this was challenging even capturing the larger gestures and my poor warbler looks like a zombie. I haven't worked with watercolors much at all so I opted out. But I can see that spending a little more time with the context will help. It's very "sketchy" and like one of the other students I always start lightly in pencil but often fail to go in and darken where it needs darkening. I also need to spend more time when I can. I get frustrated when my proportions and relationships seem off - sometimes its a matter of playing with that lineweight a bit. I was fascinated by how the warbler's feet gripped the branch and could study the foot - thank goodness it was a photo!yellow warbler
    • Tracy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      bmadison
      Drawing was, interestingly, the easy part. I just completed a beginning drawing two-day class at my local arts non-profit's studio,  so I rendered it first in graphite. However, using watercolors never, it was another interesting process capturing the details of what I had drawn from the photo. This presketch/watercolor is not finished, obviously, but now I definitely know exactly what I don't know. It was all sort of meditative and  I am very much looking forward to the rest of this course during which I anticipate learning techniques that advance me from an aspiring Audubon or RTPeterson wannabe to a status closer to apprentice. yellow warbler
    • Marjolaine
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      MergeMerge
      For me, the easiest part was to respect the proportions, I thought it would have been more difficult. The biggest challenge was the wing with all the thin lines. To represent the different textures in the feathers is not easy. I noticed so many details during the process! For exemple how the wing is built in layers and the very subtle circle around the eye. After completing my first drawing, which took me long, I tried to do it a second time now sketching it in two minutes or so. 9A406D3C-B006-4EC3-A3B5-D8B652CF3846 F9079ED5-C7B6-4DE8-B758-977CE54F46F0
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      lbattistini
      Hello Liz, here is my drawing. I really liked the picture of this cute bird and enjoyed drawing it. I don't know how to render the shades and the form of the feathers, and I would like to learn how to go from a simple sketch to an actual drawing. Thank you for your nice videos. IMG_4014
      • Shir
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        BirdShir
        Laura, I like your bird's stance and the glint in the eye. Nicely done. Enjoy the class and take your time and savor each activity. That is what I am doing...I want it to last forever so I take time to practice and do many examples for each lesson before moving forward as the class is self-paced. Just wanted to take a moment to welcome and encourage you as you move fwd through the class. Happy Nature Journaling and Field Sketching through your days.
    • Christa
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Christa Dillabaugh
      Off and running!  So glad to finally be putting pencil to paper and giving this a try.  I liked sketching with a still photo so I could take my time and really focus on trying to get the proportions right - still have some work to do on that, but not horrified by my first effort.  The heavy paper and graphite pencil were so easy to work with.  I think I'm going to like this!WIN_20200421_17_43_01_Pro
    • adriana
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      adrisnchz
      assignment 1 Yellow Warbler
      • adriana
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        adrisnchz
        The hardest part of drawing is getting the proportions  and scales correct. I struggled with the wings and the main branch of the tree.
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      jmheldenbrand
      Drawing from the photo gave me time to notice details and attempt to get them in my drawing.  I do wonder about working with live subjects!  Plants will stay put, mostly, but light will change.  Critters, if I ask kindly, will they stay put just a little longer?  Guess not...  It seems that for now, if I want to really capture details, I may need to work from photos.  Getting the drawing down with pencil was easier than I thought it would be.  Paying attention to the detail in the bird was easy.  I loved the close observation work.  I think I wouldn't have noticed the close details in the plant if I were focusing on the bird while working outside.  And if working outside, I don't think I would have as much detail in the bird.  I'd have been making text notes to come back to fill in details in the drawing later. Thank you for sharing your photos and comments.  We do learn more when we share our experiences.Yellow Warbler
      • Kimberly
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        kcollingwood
        Really love this!
    • Bonnie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      PierceCC
      I'll try to insert the image later - I haven't been able to download the image from my phone. I liked drawing from a photo - it didn't move, unlike birds.  You could look back at the image and see something new almost every time I looked.  Getting the proportions right was really tough for me and I tend to draw lightly with a pencil first and (after lots of fiddling around) got to a place that seemed pretty good.  I didn't think anything came easily.  I added the branches and leaves as an afterthought - which helped. I didn't notice that the bird had cocked its head until I read someone else had discovered it - that was brilliant.  I probably wouldn't have noticed the amount of non-yellow in the Yellow Warbler if I hadn't been trying to draw it.  The difference that journaling will probably make is I will learn how to identify which details are important.  I wonder if it is possible to find important details to include and still draw more freely.  I already learned that I enjoy playing with color and tend to spend a lot of time looking at detail.
    • Danny
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      danferg21
      I definitely struggled with drawing this photo. I am not great at drawing period, and with my kids around I really struggled to pit in the time I wanted to. However, my drawing was better than I it would be, so I am proud of myself in that sense. I think something I really noticed was the wing patterns, or any patterns in general are a huge benefit when you are drawing.
    • Debra
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      naturgal
      I loved trying to draw the warbler. I like using a photo as a reference. But I am most used to color pencils and was trying to use watercolor pencils for this one, since I thought maybe that's what would be used in the field. I noticed that the bird wasn't really looking sideways, he is somewhat looking toward us and I couldn't capture that. I noticed the black and yellow alternations in his wing feathers and that the steaks on his chest have some redness to them and are uneven.IMG_3361 (1).
    • Jean
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      JHMason
      I have a bit of a mental block about sketching, so this course will help me with that.  I'm think I'm most interested in sketching plants, so it's great that the first project was NOT plants, but something that is likely harder, i.e. this bird.  I do love bird watching!  This was fun.Screen Shot 2020-04-18 at 2.09.46 PM
    • Lynne
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      lynne.batchelder
      First I tried watercolor but found it difficult to get fine detail. So I then drew with graphite. It will be interesting to compare before course/ after course drawings!imageimage
      • Ruth
        Participant
        Chirps: 18