• Suzy
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      1. I felt terrified. Where do you start! I was also worried it would not turn out well and I would lose confidence in my abilities. Reflecting afterwards – I am my own worst critic, it turned out better than I thought it would. I am still nervous to post it, but thats why we are all here right!  Overall I am excited to see what I improve on when this course is finished. The body outline seemed easy. I enjoyed the lichen patterns too. I felt the texture of the feathers where hard to capture. 2.I really tried to pay attention to what feathers where black vs yellow in the wings. I was thoughtful on my lichen, trying to distinguish the different types. I think in journaling in real life it will be hard to capture all the colors, patterns, and details of the bird. Warblers are not in one spot for very long! I will have to learn to take a good look and try to remember as much as can. 1stSketch
    • IMG_20200323_170254I felt not very confident going in to this, but the results turned out pretty well, although I am more accustomed to  drawing larger birds. A detail that I Would have missed would most likely be the feather detail. This would make a big difference.
    • Helen
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      IMG_20200323_120909
    • Juan
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      I use to draw the bird only graphite pen HB Staedler, is correct?
    • Juan
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      photo_editor_ds_1584921359690
      • Katherine
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        I love your detail on the branch and leaves!
    • Rebecca
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      As I began, I felt the hesitation that comes with the pressure to "perform" - even though this is course is just for me, I still find myself motivated by a need to achieve. But as I began getting lost in the texture of the branches, the shape of the leaves, the posture of the warbler, the need to be "good" was overcome by an enjoyment of the detail of nature. A look at the photograph reveals a striking yellow bird against a background of green. But with a pencil in hand, trying to recreate the image, I saw all the life that is present in the image. It is not just a branch, but a symbiotic relationship with at least four forms of lichen, not just a yellow bird, but a bird with yellow, grey, deep black, rust orange. He (she?) is not just sitting on a branch, but poised, watchful, alive. In the end, I didn't add color because I like how the rough sketch captures the movement and texture and shape. I feel as though I now know a bit about yellow warblers, and will more easily identify one in the future - a knowledge I wouldn't have just from looking at the photo. IMG_3518
    • Mari
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      nice to be able to capture this image without concern that bird would move!  able to check out size of body compared to head. Tried to add color but my paper wasn't good for wet media if I tried to add more than one layer.  Ok though because I chose to use a sketchpad I had at home .  I noticed how many colors are on this bird that I would have missed if drawing it in nature. When I draw it next I will be able to add those colors.
    • Chloe
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
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    • Katherine
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Inspired by the journal survey video, I was trying to think about birds' shapes, about how to fill the page, and about how to verbally note the experience in addition to images. Because I wasn't in the field, I borrowed my text from the Cornell Lab overview of the yellow warbler, in addition to writing in my ideas about drawing vs. photographs (for me it's in the timing of detail: drawing invites contemplation of details in the moment, whereas a looking at a photograph, not necessarily taking a photograph, invites contemplation of detail after the encounter has ended). Thinking about shapes actually really did make the drawing easier, but I really struggled with finding a full-page style that I liked. When I first started this course I was all about learning more about drawing anatomy, but now I'm excited to think about developing a visual thinking style that includes both text and image. I definitely don't think I would have paid attention to the moss on the twig if I weren't trying to draw the photograph, and I also don't think I would have noticed how the head of the warbler isn't mottled with other colors. I think it'll definitely make a difference when journaling, but I'm unsure how I'll react to missing detail when confronted with moving and living beings who can remove themselves from the portrait sitting at any moment. Warbler
      • Tom
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        Hi, I love the term (and idea of) “a visual thinking style!”  Thanks for sharing your process and progress and I commend you for your overall and multi-faceted approach you are taking to this “sketching course.”  I too sense opportunities for personal engagement and creating a personalized record that may be shareable, but most importantly represents the full experience of observation, study and appreciation of Nature.
      • Katherine
        Participant
        Chirps: 3

        @Tom Hi, Tom, thanks for your thoughts!

    • Lois
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I felt  overwhelmed - there is so much to the bird, how can I draw it all?  The overall bird outline came easily, although the proportions need some work.  I found it challenging to draw the leaves well, and impossible to reproduce the glossy, leathery texture of the leaves.  I avoided entirely the challenge of expressing the lichen on the branch. YellowWarbler_20200319
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      IMG_0152
    • jon
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      It was difficult to get the proportions right—how long the legs should be, how long the tail sticks out relative to the rest of the bird. I thought proportions would come more naturally, but turns out it's hard to get them right! I did enjoy the process of drawing the bird, and felt like I noticed the streaks on the chest in greater detail than I would have had I simply taken a photo and moved on. I also noticed that right near the bird's nape (back of neck, yes?) the yellow hue turns more olive-yellow as opposed to the bright lemon-yellow on the birds face and flanks. This would definitely make a difference in nature journaling, because otherwise these details would be missed.
    • Gigi
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Did not use color on this, but here it is. I am not in love with the result, but I am trying not to judge myself and have forced myself to share! I found myself noticing the details on leaves and the bark as well as the slight tones of grey around the bird's head. I struggled to bring the image to life the way I would like, and evoke a sense of the "moment." If I was not asked the draw the photo, I probably would not have noticed the way the leg positioning changes the overall shape of the bird. yellowwarblerday1
    • Lynne
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      It was a lot harder to draw than I imagined but I enjoyed doing it immensely -- I was completely absorbed in the details, even if I didn't do a very good job of portraying them.  I wouldn't say anything came easily.  I have not tried drawing anything like that in nearly 40 years.   I have been taking photos of birds for some time, and this is very different.   I am a bird watcher and educator, so I am used to spending time observing bird form and behaviour through binoculars or scope and identifying and interepreting them for groups, but this is a very different experience, lending much more attention to the finer details of the form and physical features rather than behavior.  (Now I see the bill is more like a duck's -- a Duck-billed Warbler!)
    • Lynne
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      yellow warbler start
    • Marylin
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      • Well, the subject didn't fly away - that's good! The photograph gave me time to observe details about the bird I probably wouldn't have noticed in the field. In the field, birds are tiny, quick and tend to hide behind branches, leaves and in the underbrush, making observation difficult. I didn't use watercolor for this first sketch (computer is upstairs, drawing equipment is downstairs). I will print out the warbler picture to work on for my next sketch. I think that next time, I will try to compose the picture better.
      • first sketch yellow warbler - Marylin Hughes
    • I found this difficult. I didn't even try to add color. After comparing what I did to the others, I feel like I'm just not very good. It's frustrating because I have taken drawing lessons. I don't know how it would be to draw warblers from life, as they are always moving.
    • Karinne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_8319Typically, I draw from photos instead of from real life, which is much harder.  I often take photos, just so that I can zoom into what I see, and with birds, have a better chance of identification.  While working on this exercise, I found myself more attentive, interestingly enough, to the texture of the feathers and leaves -- as well as the variations of color.
    • Marla
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      first
    • Margo
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Im a complete beginner in sketching, painting etc. and .  The photo was was a challenge as there was this desire to capture all the detail. I would think I was done then would see something else that I missed. Hoping to learn alot.  I love nature and live in a setting close to Rocky Mountain National Park so will have lotsa of opportunities to capture what see. ex1warbler3
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      WIN_20200313_10_36_44_Pro
      • Ann
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        The biggest challenges for me (Ann) were getting the posture of the bird correct and deciding what details of the background to include.  It took me much too much time to complete!
    • Tony
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_5337
      • Lynn
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        Nice job Tony!  You really captured that Warbler look! Lynn
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Drawing from photo for me is the way I do most of my drawings of birds, so I'm familiar to this type of drawing. I usually start by the limit of the head and bill, for me this sets my proportions. I continued by setting the length of the wings, were I always struggle to get it right. I then set the limit for my alula feathers and the coverts on the wings, I did the rest of the body and tail in last. The golden hues on the head and gorge (throat) probably I would miss it. The black center of the secundaries and the black on primaries made me focus more there a bit. Doing the drawing I have two questions: Is there a black bar on the wings if the bird was in flight? What is the species of the tree where the bird seats, and is there a conection between the two?89661395_1033729503663455_2315849067537629184_n
      • David
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        P.S. When I draw, I search for questions and when I take some photos I'm more focused in the zoom, the focus, the light, if the framing is right. So my nature journaling changes my mind setting.
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Body was sort of not difficult. I struggle with proportions. It’s head looks big and heavy, though it’s a lithe looking bird. i wouldn’t have noticed how thin and stripped the wing feathers are as they lay against the body.544454BF-0E4A-4726-9435-E2D08F3C2C24
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      A photo is fast, and captures a moment. That makes them hard to imitate, though a lot easier than just drawing in the field. I have the hardest time with beaks. Mine never seem to be the right shape, angle, etc.   I never before realized how much black and grey are on a yellow warbler.