• Cristina
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      apus apus Why the Apus Apus sleep while flying?
    • Zariel
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Yes, I am noticing some more themes of nature. I found some tent caterpillars on one of my trees the other day, they had rolled up the leaf and surrounded it with a kind of "web", it was very strange looking. The tent caterpillars use their "tent" as a safe hide out from predators and the elements.
    • Camille
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Nature Journal 6-10-2021 One of the themes I've noticed while nature journaling is the impact of human activities on wildlife. Sometimes it is freeway noise and sometimes it is the frequency of humans (sometimes with dogs) using trails near where animals live. Some animals, like the pond ducks I wrote about, got really close to people, especially if people brought food. Other birds, like a little sparrow and some crows only came to the same area if people were farther away.
    • Denise
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      94C41231-3ACE-47BF-B6AD-2E7FE38DA734 I’ve definitely been more observant whenever I’m outside, even if I’m not journaling.
    • Gerda
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      65ED8D1C-1144-49FE-AF25-2926860C4BC3_1_105_c EABA8126-1942-4108-811D-DF12C38DE1A9_1_105_c Observing and drawing in this class. For the hummingbird I used my limited colored Prismacolor Pencils, and the Raven is done with a variety of  Faber-Castell Graphite Pencils.
    • Gerda
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      720AC671-16C0-483E-BEE4-12E73758AC02_1_105_c I live in Oregon and love to hike in the Cascade Mountains, rarely do I sit alone and meditate. Liz inspired me to do just that and journal about it. Thank you - this was quite the experience.
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I think I need to ask myself more questions, get me thinking about the finer details of the subject. unnamed (1)
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        I think you have asked yourself the questions already. By the pictures and the information that flows from your drawings, even if there is no question shown. You have answered the question in your head with such amazing detail. Thank you for sharing
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      img273 edited
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      img272 edited
    • Sara Alice
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      May 1, 2021  Hot/sunny 8:45 am Ev. Nat. Pk. Long Pine Key Observation 1. What was that pair of small grey-green birds that flit between the pine trunks? Sometimes upside down. Very busy. Not black and white warblers, not nuthatches or brown creepers (out of area). Silent. What are they looking for? Where did they come from? Are they on the way to somewhere? Who are they? Observation 2. He was on the ground - a black bird. Way on the other side of the parking lot. Oh, a purple grackle. Then he flew at me. He's coming right at me. Will he stop? Should I duck? No. I'll sit still. Whew, he landed about 3 feet from my picnic table on the ground. Was he begging from me? But no, he wanted a big red bug! How had he seen that from so far away? Why did he pick on that?   He hopped to the van and went around it. Walked into the woods behind me. I heard his little footsteps in the brown dry leaves. Then he was gone. So, other questions - What else does he like to eat out here? Grackles often go in flocks, so where are his friends? Is this his usual feeding routine? Half an hour later he reappeared and went into a clump of bushes. Exited. Followed by a squally fledgling. Oh my, could he be a she?
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        I love your observation and questions. Thank you for sharing.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      IMG_1473
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 40
      76B59262-5B50-40E3-A88D-1FB5EAC18BBD
      • Dee
        Participant
        Chirps: 40
        I watched this porcupine in a willow tree as it climbed up to some of the thinner branches and then returned again to the original spot to sleep. I didn't know anything about porcupines but,  I read that porcupines often sleep in trees.  They are nocturnal  and feed on vegetation and some insects.  The porcupine stayed in the tree until dusk, in the morning he was gone.
      • Dee
        Participant
        Chirps: 40
        4/9/21    The porcupine is back in  my willow tree.  I now call him "Bristles".  Today he climbed up to higher branches and he was eating the new yellow/green shoots on the willow branches . Sometimes he looked like he was going to fall but didn't.  He grasped the branch he was on with his sharp claw while reaching out and grabbing the young willow shoots.  He also used his tail for support.  Sometimes "Bristles" would just curl up rest for a while.  He was still in the tree at dusk.
      • Fiona
        Participant
        Chirps: 1

        @Dee Thanks for sharing your Porcupine experiences. I don't think I have them here in Westerns NC... doesn't matter. Astounded that they spend so much time in trees! Great observations.

      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        I never knew porcupines climbed trees... how interesting.  Good catch!
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 40
      2CFEA762-DD07-4ECD-9B3C-7D951B413C41
    • Eleanor
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Themes seem to pop up with everything I look at!  The overlap of themes was overwhelming at first, but I decided to just roll with it - nature isn't black and white, after all.  For example, when comparing the size and location of two groups of similar ants, my possible explanations and further questions involved form & function and systems & energy flow.IMG_20210403_144728221
      • Arleene
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        Yes that's true one questions leads to another and another. Isn't it great to be so inquisitive! Puts a little spunk back into my step and joy into my heart!
    • Francesca
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      63691034953__F306BB07-98F1-4E0E-A1F9-D50045006D2F This was one of a few pages I did during the "themes" lesson.  In this case I was looking at patterns in the camellia petals.  I was noticing how the petals near the center lined up radially away from the center.  I also noticed that in the tip of each petal was a slight thickening that showed when the light came through the petal.
      • Karin
        Participant
        Chirps: 25
        Cool! Thanks for the inspiration
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      For my nature theme, I chose form & function. Bufflehead
      • Arleene
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        Oh lovely, I like the colouring on the head!
    • Francesca
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      IMG_9809I I made my sketch of the beetles (below) and came home to look up what they were.  These are box elder bugs, and I love the markings.  They appear to be harmless to the trees, seeds, and leaves that they feed on.  This time of year seems  very unlikely for the seedpods, but according to other commenters I found online they do also eat other leaves, dung, and dead insects.  Pretty much anything.  Doing this thematic exercise helped me to appreciate and learn from the insects rather than just be annoyed they chased me from my creekside sit spot!
    • Francesca
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      I was looking for a seat by the creek in a nearby park, but found far too many insects flying around, which is unusual.  They were clustered thick on the ground in places, and flying everywhere.  IMG_9801
    • Pam
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Walk in the park, overcast skies with the sun peaking out now and then, temperature in mid 70’s.  The turtles were out on logs all over the pond. Some logs had 10-15, some fewer. One log had two, one had just one. Why so many turtles to a log? For companionship, for warmth? Are they spacially aware they are so crowded?
    • laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      85896C40-67E8-4902-9378-1DAE5AE25E6C_1_105_cDuring a recent wandering at the downtown waterfront in my hometown, I noticed how the snow at the base of trees, deciduous and coniferous, melts in a ring around the base. Why? I thought that perhaps the tree itself, being alive, would exude some heat (however minor). So I looked at manmade/non-organic objects but they too often had a ring at the base so that can't be the reason (or at least not the whole reason). What about solar energy heating the bark? A drip line from the tree's branches perhaps as I noticed that evergreens had larger rings around them than their deciduous counterparts. But that could also be from reduced snow that falls at the base due to the tree's canopy? Time to do some research.
    • Isobel
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      leaf veinsleaf pagephoto leaf I became really absorbed with drawing the individual capillary like patterns on this leaf, which when i was done resembled both a lung and a river system, beautiful pattern! I walk past this plant everyday, and have never stopped to really look at it - I am really enjoying this opportunity to finally pay attention to the complexity of something as simple as a leaf.
      • Suzanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        These sorts of patterns draw my attention as well. Broccoli look like miniature trees, clouds resemble the patterns of settled sand at the shoreline, a river with its tributaries resembles our circulatory system, a flock of birds, especially when they turn as a group, resemble a school of fish. I'm happy to hear someone else notices these quirky similarities between very different "systems."
    • Robert
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      We just had a big northeaster with snow, rain, wind so not possible to go sit outside.  Will go out shortly to watch the ocean. See how the various winter waterfowl (e.g., eiders, buffleheads) are weathering the storms
    • Deirdre
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      ArbutusGrove2ARBUTUS GROVE4ArbutusGrove1
    • Judith
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Cottonwood
    • lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      nature sit spot observation